Silverstone CS380 case hot-swaps eight drives

If you want to build a home server or NAS with a whole bunch of redundant storage, Silverstone has the chassis for you. The CS380 case (from the company's "Case Storage Series") was originally shown last year as a micro-ATX concept design. Silverstone eventually decided to go bigger and presented the concept this year at CES, this time as a steel ATX mid-tower case of fairly standard dimensions and design. The interesting part of the case is its fan-cooled storage bay that can accept eight 3.5" or 2.5" devices in hot-swappable drive caddies.

Those drive caddies are accessible right from the front of the case, which Silverstone covers with a locking door so folks can't walk up and steal your data. The drives themselves plug into a custom backplane that supports both SATA and SAS. Silverstone includes a pair of side-facing 120-mm fans to keep the drives cool. A third 120-mm spinner comes mounted in the back of the case.

Besides the removable storage caddies, the case offers a pair of 5.25" bays. Enterprising builders could certainly build a typical desktop in this case, as it accepts standard ATX motherboards and power supplies. Some behind-the-motherboard cable routing is available as well. However, graphics cards are limited to just 9.5" in length. That fact, combined with the unusual cooling arrangement, means this case probably isn't the best choice for a gaming rig. Silverstone hasn't provided availability or pricing info for the CS380.

Comments closed
    • hans
    • 3 years ago

    I hope this turns out better than the DS380 but the drive trays look a little crooked in the 4th image on Silverstone’s site, so I think I’ll have to wait for a couple reviews before considering this.

      • hans
      • 3 years ago

      Now that I see the drive fans are lined up such that only half of the fan lines up with the vent perforations, I’m less excited.

      And I can’t imagine anyone buying this case is going to use dual-port SAS disks. From the manual:
      “For connecting to dual channel SAS drives, you must also connect to SAS plugs on the left side of the backplane”

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, it’s a nice idea, superficially but it stinks of “too cheap”.

        Silverstone are one of those companies that always deserve credit for trying something different but many of the things they make are problematic, be it weird layouts, unusual mechanisms, or slightly low quality. I have never used a Silverstone case and thought “wow, that was awesome I’ll do it again”. It’s usually more like “oh, I have to use this Silverstone case because it’s the only thing that will work in this unique situation” and I tolerate the problems because there are literally no alternatives on the market.

    • vargis14
    • 3 years ago

    I like the look of the case on the outside, but i feel it would be much more appealing if they just put a coat of paint on the inside…..without it looks very cheap IMHO.

    • Waco
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t understand why anyone would build a NAS and use a desktop midtower. There are plenty of 12/16/20/24 bay 4U server chassis for not a whole lot of coin that do the job a lot better.

      • moriz
      • 3 years ago

      wouldn’t a server chassis need a rack and external cooling?

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        External cooling? I don’t know of anything outside of dedicated HPC boxes that require external cooling hardware. All server chassis, in general, have internal fans. They’re usually pretty loud, it’s really the only drawback (my Norco chassis has 80mm fans).

        They’ll sit on a shelf just fine, and if you’re so inclined, you can run them on their side like a tower.

        This one would probably serve many well. I’m just a picky storage guy. 🙂

        • DrDominodog51
        • 3 years ago

        Some 4Us can be oriented vertically and most would be fine without active cooling.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Server racks are really wide, that’s the problem. (Or really tall if vertically-oriented, which presents problems of its own). I’ll be soon-ish building a home NAS and I’m almost certainly going with one of Fractal’s Core cases because since they’re cuboidal-ish, they can be stowed easily.

      Also, server cases tend to be big on cooling and huge on noise, which is not something you want anywhere close to you.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Most server chassis are designed to be rack mounted, and are not designed with quiet operation in mind. Both of these factors can be an issue in a home or small office environment.

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        Noted. Mine is in the basement. 😛

      • cmrcmk
      • 3 years ago

      I recently built a home file server and went with a cheap silverstone featuring 6 internal 3.5″ bays. I looked for rackmount alternatives but couldn’t find any that were small enough depth-wise or could be had for less than a few hundred dollars new.

      Also, if the top billed feature of this case is hot swap bays, why don’t the included images show them?

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        I needed 17 bays for mine, so normal cases just wouldn’t work. If you follow the link there are pictures of the bays, they’re arranged interestingly. It is great they support SAS but the connection they’re using looks nonstandard, so you’ll likely need adapters.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 3 years ago

          17 bays? That’s over 50 TB of storage. Hell, with modern high capacity drives, you’re at over 100 TB.

          What the actual fuck, brah.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            16 2 TB drives, and a single 32 GB SSD for metadata caching. I’m in the process of rebuilding it into a set of 5+3 RAIDZ3s (it’s currently only 12 2 TB drives, in 6 mirrors).

            Storage is my day job, so I play at home.

        • stdRaichu
        • 3 years ago

        Rackmounts are nice if you’ve got the space – racks themselves are very chunky and unless you’re extremely careful about components, you basically need a dedicated room for them because of the noise – not an option for me.

        I went with the [url=http://www.u-nas.com/xcart/product.php?productid=17617&cat=249&page=1<]U-NAS 800[/url<] mITX chassis which, even if a little cramped inside, is a tiny form factor and almost completely silent under normal use. What I do find odd is that Silverstone already make a dedicated NAS-ish case in the form of the [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=452<]DS380[/url<]*. All this case gets you is the ability to use an ATX mobo I think... * I tried one of these before settling on the U-NAS, the DS380's drive trays wobbled a bit and the fans cooling them were not very effective. P.P.S. Short-depth racks, especially those with hot-swap bays, are few and far between but I did find the In-Win IW-RS212-02SC and the very peculiar dual-mITX Travla T2280 2U on my travels which some of you might find useful.

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