Wasteland 3 blasts through funding goal in just 3 days

inXile Entertainment announced Wasteland 3 just a couple weeks ago, and very recently kicked off a crowdfunding campaign. Just three days after the campaign began, Wasteland 3 met its funding goal of $2.75 million and is beginning to push toward the stretch goals to add bonus content. At the time of writing, the campaign has passed $2.8 million with almost 25 days still left. This latest sequel to the long-running series sends the player and their party of Rangers to the previously-unexplored region of Colorado. Cooperative multiplayer is on the menu, too—a first for the series.

Wasteland is one of the oldest series in gaming, and was one of the very first to depict the sort of post-apocalyptic nuclear wasteland that has become a cliché in modern games. The original Wasteland hit in 1988, almost a decade before the original Fallout. Wasteland was unprecedented at the time; despite arriving on a few floppy disks in an age when not everyone hard a hard drive, the game offered a persistent game world and a huge amount of text. Due to data storage limitations, that text accompanied the game as a separate book. Now that is some serious copy protection.

In March of 2012, nearly a quarter-century after the original Wasteland, developer Brian Fargo (of Bard's Tale fame) revived the license with help from some original members of the Wasteland team. A successful Kickstarter campaign resulted in the release of a Wasteland 2, a game that was received well by critics and fans old and new alike. That puts the series prestigious company with the likes of Divinity: Original Sin, Pillars of Eternity, and Shadowrun Returns. It even did well enough to warrant a jump to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

This time around, inXile took to Fig to fund its game. Fig is a crowdfunding platform like Kickstarter, but created specifically with game development in mind. The site was founded by veteran developers from companies like Double Fine, Obsidian, and inXile itself. To appear on Fig, games go through an expert-backed vetting process. Investors can take part in that process as well, making money back from the game upon release.

inXile managed to revive one of the oldest names in gaming and make it relevant again without letting go of its hardcore RPG roots, thanks to the magic of crowdfunding. Wasteland 3 is currently expected in late 2019.

Comments closed
    • Starfalcon
    • 3 years ago

    I would crowdfund this, except for the whole fig thing. I see it as a conflict of interest to crowdfund a game on a crowdfunding site you are a majority owner of. Also not including all the legalise they put in your investor information, basically if they decide not to pay you any profits, sucks to be you.

    Plus with the whole bards tale 4 crowfund that they really botched, lots of unhappy people there. Plus the biggest question, with all the sucessful games they have made in the last few years, why are they still crowdfunding them except, hey free money for us. Not like they are an indie game house with 4 people making games.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      I can understand reticence over the new venue but let’s be real here, said founders are a shortlist of hugely successful crowdfund developers who’d have no trouble being listed on the site of their choice. Their plan is probably to share the financial infrastructure for doing these types of things without having to hand over a big cut of the proceeds to KS or Indiegogo for services that they don’t really need anymore, and I can’t fault them for that.

      As for why they’re doing it, probably because it works and it cuts out most of the middlemen. Most businesses aren’t printing presses so I doubt any of them has $5+ million just sitting in the bank doing nothing for the next 3-4 years, and bringing in significant outside investment means granting veto power to the pointy-haired studio suits that alienated consumers and made these old guys ragequit in the mid 2000s. So why not simultaneously fund the game upfront and make diehard fans feel like they’re involved in the dev process?

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        I agree. This is going to help them, in the long run, to funnel more of a donor’s funds into actual production.

    • quaz0r
    • 3 years ago

    seems like all the games in recent times are this 2.5D sort of crap. seems like a real cop-out cheap-out. did i go to bed and wake up back in the 1990s? convince everyone retro is cool so then you can cheap out on everything. its like so many other things lately, eg convince everyone that cheap thin 10-sizes-too-small clothes are the in fashion, so you can sell them cheap crap made by 5 year old slaves for 2 cents. no thanks. i want my clothes to fit and i want my 3D to have all 3 D’s.

      • joselillo_25
      • 3 years ago

      I hate first person shooters and prefer cenital view like jrpg, is a matter of preferences.

      3d first person is also from the 90s

    • TwoEars
    • 3 years ago

    Actually a bit surprising. Wasteland 2 was mediocre in my book and I think the metacritic user score of 7.3 reflects that. Perhaps their timing for the announcement was really good.

    • Platedslicer
    • 3 years ago

    I really liked the mechanics of Wasteland 2, XCOM-style combat with more involved character development. There were a lot of interesting side quests and not-too-shabby NPCs too.

    Still, it’s still not quite up to Fallout 2 levels of world-building and story telling. I guess the military overtones of the Desert Rangers make it kinda hard to tell a more personal story… but what I miss more than that is the feeling, which you definitely get in Fallouts 1, 2 and New Vegas, of civilization trying to raise itself from the brink of destruction.

    In FO there are lots of bad things happening, but there are also people trying to set things straight (in their own imperfect way) and succeeding to some extent. Whereas in WL2 everything seems to be going to sh*t – the world is largely divided between murderous assh*les on one side, weak, helpless victims on another, and the Desert Rangers in between. I think I’d prefer a more nuanced take on humanity after the apocalypse.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Crowdfunding just amazes me how much money gets thrown at startup projects. Many of which you never hear about after they launch.

      • Platedslicer
      • 3 years ago

      And do you think that “professional” startup investing is a lot different? By the very nature of the process, most people only hear about the startups that work out (or at least look like they’re going to work out), but the vast majority of them end up floundering. Reputations can and do get damaged but (usually) nobody goes to jail. If someone wants to risk their money on a project that may never see the light of day, it’s their business.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      Sorry state of the industry. Virtually all of the big crowdfund success stories, along with their fans, tried desperately for many years to get the publishing cartel to make the game but were told to get lost because anything that’s not [i<]Medal of Dutyfield 56: Now With More DLC![/i<] is clearly not worth making. Fargo even made light of his experiences in one of the [url=https://youtu.be/MBmrT4LuJRw?t=49<]W2 pitch videos[/url<], and it is indeed glorious. While I can't speak for everyone, my approach to crowdfunds has been to back a few with a portion of the money I'm no longer spending on AAAs. As for not hearing a lot about them later, again, state of the industry. Witcher 3 is about the only game I can think of from the last couple of years--AAA or indie--that got talked about after the fact for something other than being an epic cluster bomb, the rest just faded to the $5 seasonal-sale territory.

        • I.S.T.
        • 3 years ago

        Fallout 4 says “Hello.”

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Neat. I still need to get around to playing Wasteland 2, more interested to see how Torment shapes up.

    In the meantime, I’ve been playing [url=http://store.steampowered.com/app/333640/<]Caves of Qud[/url<], which is reminiscent of Wasteland (and Fountain of Dreams) in some ways, although despite (or because of) the far-future setting, [spoiler<]I've started to notice clues that the game is not set on Earth[/spoiler<].

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      I’d be interested in this game but then I saw the screenshots on the Steam page.
      Do you think my GTX-1080 has enough graphics power to run this thing at acceptable frame rates?

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        You definitely need a Pascal Titan X.

    • I.S.T.
    • 3 years ago

    Well, two of the games to get on Fig were games by the people who founded it. Forgive me if I think the vetting process is bull****.

    As for the game being funded: cool. Hope people enjoy it. I’ve not played the second nor do I own it, though I look forward to trying it one day.

      • whm1974
      • 3 years ago

      Get it the game is great. I’m currently playing the game.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Seconded. I backed Wasteland 2 and it was a good decision. The only other Kickstarter I’ve ever backed is the upcoming Battletech game, and I hope it’s even half as worth the wait that Wasteland 2 was.

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