Exynos 7 Dual 7270 SoC adds LTE connectivity to wearable devices

Samsung may have its hands full with Note7 fires and washing machines that might spin until they explode, but some things are still going according to plan for the Korean electronics giant. The company's mobile chip division continues to churn out compelling products. The Exynos 7 Dual 7270 system-on-a-chip is what the company calls the first application processor (AP) built on a 14-nm process, and also the first AP with an integrated LTE modem.

The 7270 contains a pair of ARM Cortex-A53 cores, a Cat.4 LTE modem, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, and FM radio and GNSS receivers. The chip is produced using what Samsung calls "system-in-package-embedded package-on-package" (SiP-ePOP) technology. The AP itself, the DRAM, NAND flash memory, and power management circuits are all housed in the same package. According to Samsung, the entire package measures 100 mm2 and takes 30% less vertical space compared to previous-generation chips. The manufacturer also says the 7270 has 20% greater power efficiency when compared to previous-generation 28-nm processors.

According to Samsung, the 7270 is designed for wearable devices, a product class where the decreased size and increased power efficiency offered by 14-nm fabrication are especially important. The Exynos 7270 could allow a smartwatch to make telephone calls or a fitness tracker to have GPS capabilities, all without the need for an accompanying smartphone.

Samsung is now offering a development kit to device manufacturers that includes an Exynos 7 Dual 7270 AP, NFC gear, and "various sensors." There's no word yet on actual consumer products built around the new chip.

Comments closed
    • ludi
    • 3 years ago

    This will be perfect for my single-use IoT handwarmer.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    20% power reduction is kinda stupid at this point. No way this 14-nm process is anything but marketing.

    Samsung [url=http://globalfoundries.com/newsroom/press-releases/2014/04/17/samsung-and-globalfoundries-forge-strategic-collaboration-to-deliver-multi-sourced-offering-of-14nm-finfet-semiconductor-technology<]got in bed with GloFo[/url<] for 14nm chips. GloFo's Polaris chips have been a disappointment from a power-consumption angle. I don't think it's any surprise that Samsung's 14nm chips aren't any better than GloFo from a generation-on-generation efficiency standpoint.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    “The Exynos 7270 could allow a smartwatch to make telephone calls” no, it would allow samsung smartwatches to make telephone calls. i highly doubt any other brand would be allowed to use this.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Great, now our underwear can botnet the Internet.

      • paulWTAMU
      • 3 years ago

      Huh. I always wanted text alerts if I was leaving skidmarks. Now I guess it’s possible.

        • Redocbew
        • 3 years ago

        If you need text alerts to prevent leaving skidmarks, then something has gone terribly wrong with your life.

    • LostCat
    • 3 years ago

    Wearable technology, recently setting people on fire. Yay!

    (Yes, I know it’s not the processors doing it.)

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Oh, we’ve had wearable technology that can set people on fire for a LONG time now.

      [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M2_flamethrower[/url<]

    • TheJack
    • 3 years ago

    20% more efficient!!! Going from 28 to 14 nm process. Underwhelming.

      • NeelyCam
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Powered by two Cortex®-A53 cores, the Exynos 7270 makes full use of the 14nm process, delivering 20 percent improvement in power efficiency when compared to its predecessor built on 28nm, and thus [b<]notably extending the battery life[/b<].[/quote<] Lol. Underwhelming is right.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        Whereas underwhelming is an understatement.

        • Kraaketaer
        • 3 years ago

        I guess the main question is how large the accompanying performance increase is. For only 20% improvement in power efficiency, I’d expect a decent performance increase. It’s a full node shrink, after all. Then again, how much increased performance do we need in our smartwatches?

          • TheJack
          • 3 years ago

          Actually it is two nodes. So, hopefully for Samsung, you are right.

          • Airmantharp
          • 3 years ago

          Probably more important that they squeezed all the extra radios into it. LTE would mean that your smart watch could do quite a bit more in terms of geolocation (particularly given how weak most GPS receivers are), in addition to the WiFi sensing which also helps.

          Beyond that, who knows. I’d ever only wear a smart watch for fitness purposes, and I’ve yet to see the need to invest in one.

        • cynan
        • 3 years ago

        So… if the “notably extending the batter life” doesn’t refer to the underwhelming 20% increase in efficiency, the only logical conclusion is that the Exynos 7270 will cause the batteries of devices in which they are implemented to catch fire (as with other recent attempts by [b<]Samsung[/b<] to [b<]Not[s<]e[/s<][/b<]ably increasing battery life.

      • kalelovil
      • 3 years ago

      I presume the 20% greater efficiency is for the whole package (including the DRAM, NAND and power management IC), not the 14nm application processor alone.
      Quick googling doesn’t reveal what predecessor they are comparing it to.

      • wingless
      • 3 years ago

      It’s not magic, it’s physics. Halving the process doesn’t magically mean half the power. It does not work that way on these small scales. You’re getting more processing power out of something smaller so the trade-off is power. The law of diminishing returns has been up in silicon’s business for a while now.

      We should be impressed we’re getting 20%!

        • GTVic
        • 3 years ago

        Exactly, perhaps these armchair critics could show us their designs getting better numbers.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        Going from 28 nm to 14, you are not halving, but quartering the transistor size. So,yeah, don’t be impressed.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    How is Exynos pronounced anyway?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      I’ll call somebody at Asus for help.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        You’ve reminded me of the worst Asus video ever.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      Ex-in-ohs is how I’ve already read it.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Ex (ex-wife)
      In (and out)
      Os ([i<]Os[/i<]trich)

      • Wildchild
      • 3 years ago

      I always pronounced it as Xe-nos (like the beginning of xenomorph). I’m probably, most definitely wrong, but it sounds cooler that way.

      Did I mention I have dyslexia?

        • Wirko
        • 3 years ago

        Just be careful to not say it wrong if you have a N7 lying around. It’s been programmed to overload its Exynos and, in turn, the battery if it detects that. The rest of the story you know.

          • Redocbew
          • 3 years ago

          Exynos is the new Shibboleet.

          [url<]https://xkcd.com/806/[/url<]

      • Unknown-Error
      • 3 years ago

      Ek-Zee-nos

      • GTVic
      • 3 years ago

      The Exy is silent, so it’s just “nos”.

    • cegras
    • 3 years ago

    Samsung with the damage control.

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