Poll: Does your ISP cap your internet connection?

The state of Internet service in the United States is a bit of a mess. Unless you're a lucky soul in a Google Fiber neighborhood or a city with a municipal broadband provider, truly high-speed internet access can be hard to get. Even if one does luck out in an area where a high-speed connection is available, service providers can impose onerous restrictions on what customers can do with those tubes.

One such restriction is the dreaded usage cap, the dubious technical merits of which the industry freely admits. Exceed some pre-defined amount of data transfer in a month, the theory goes, and you'll start incurring charges on your bill. It's only fair that those who use the most, pay the most, right?

Comcast is a pioneering implementer of these caps. The company began experimenting with 250GB limits as far back as 2008, and it started thinking about 300GB ceilings in some parts of the United States a little over four years ago. More recently, the company decided to bump that figure to one terabyte alongside a much broader roll-out of the restriction. Though the company tries to put a pleasant face on the plan by offering examples of the many things one might do with a terabyte of data, PC gamers and 4K streamers are doubtless already groaning.

Yours truly pays Comcast about $60 per month for a 75 Mb/s downstream connection, and I recently got word that my line would be subject to that limitation. If I go over that one-terabyte limit, Comcast will forgive my sins the first two times it happens in a calendar year. (Should I hit three strikes at any point, though, Comcast will offer no further grace periods over the remainder of my contract with the company).

Thereafter, I'll have to pay $10 for each increment of 50GB I go over the cap, all the way up to $200 in extra charges. Comcast gives residential customers with insatiable appetites for data the option to get around the cap entirely by paying an extra $50 a month. Customers with the company's gigabit services aren't subject to caps, and Comcast says it will never cut users' service off for data overages alone.

In all fairness, I don't think this cap will affect me much most months. Going by Comcast's own "data meter," my heaviest month of usage this year was in August, when we reviewed the Radeon RX 470 and RX 460 in close succession. I hit 649GB that month, at least in part from game downloads. Preparing our suite of games for TR's GTX 1060 review has already put me 720GB in the hole for October, however, and I may not be finished downloading stuff yet. That figure is a bit concerning after only a bit over a week of usage.

The point of this long-winded story is that we're curious just how many TR readers have restrictions on the amount of data they can transfer over their home internet connections per month. Let us know using the options in the poll below.

Comments closed
    • VincentHanna
    • 3 years ago

    My old cable company, when they set up my account, they went out of their way to inform me that there would never be any data caps… I still cussed out the CS rep, who was just doing her job and told her that I don’t like being threatened, her that there was no way in hell that I would have payed for a capped internet.

    That being said, I’m a relatively light user and would likely never hit 500gb in a month. 150 maybe, but not routinely.

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 3 years ago

    Yup, 150 GB. 30mbit/s down, 10mbit/s up. $54/month from Videotron in Montreal.

    I could have 120 down / 20 up with no cap for $80, but don’t believe in paying that much for consumer internet.

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t know, but I haven’t hit any limits yet

    • rwburnham
    • 3 years ago

    I use Cox and there is no hard limit, but all accounts have a soft limit. If you go way over it they send you an email suggesting that you move to a faster plan that includes a higher limit. One buddy of mine did some serious downloading and was automatically moved to a more expensive business plan.

    I understand ISPs wanting to manage traffic on their servers and prevent people from downloading things illegally, but the idea of data caps on home service is just stupid. We’ll get past it eventually, and people will look back on data caps with bewilderment.

    • Freon
    • 3 years ago

    1TB is fairly common so you may want to rethink the poll options, Jeff. None of them fit what is probably one of the most common cap levels.

    Mine is 1024GB with AT&T UVerse. It’s plenty. My typical month is around 250-300GB, worst ever was about 540.

      • spiritwalker2222
      • 3 years ago

      Sucks to live in Canada. 100 GB limit, with a fee of 1$ for every GB over the limit.

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 3 years ago

    I think my bonded DSL has a physical cap. I don’t think Frontier has ever had to worry about overages, unless they think data in terms of baud.

    • rutra80
    • 3 years ago

    Lacks an answer: Dunno, never hit it anyway.

    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    Last I checked I had a 250GB/mo cap with Eastlink in Canada, however there was rumors of it getting bumped up or squashed.

    I personally would rather have unlimited bandwidth and pay per GB, that is if it was reasonable, like say 10 cents/GB. Then again I don’t think I have ever gone over 215GB in a month, and that’s updating OS’s, DL games, and kids and wife constantly on youtube and netflix.

    I guess if you’re a digital hoarder/consumer, then 10 cents/GB might end up being more $.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Eastlink is my ISP too! Did we talk about that? Usually being a Maritimer people have never heard of my ISP online.

    • Kougar
    • 3 years ago

    Sounds like you might have to think about an overpriced “business” line from Comcast that has no caps. Awful specs/price and two year agreement to guarantee yer stuck with it though. Then again it looks cheaper to just pay the overages based on what you have.

    For what it’s worth Spectrum is making a point to advertise no modem fees and unlimited usage on its current plans.

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    My ISP had us on 20/2 for the longest time, no caps but not particularly fast, it was probably half of that a number of years earlier as well. Then Bell-Alliant came into the area with FiberOp, and lo and behold the incumbent ISP more than doubled everything to 50/5, although to do it you had to “unlock” the wifi portion of the SBG6580 combo unit…I suspect because the craptacular wifi would limit most peoples speed. But anywho, bring your own router and no issue. And then a very short time later…Lo and behold again, doubled to 100/10 at no additional charge, all because Bell-Alliant fiberop had 100Mbits for the same price as their 20/2 turned 50/5. Upload is still slower than fiberop (100/50 I think?), but I don’t upload enough to make the switch.

    It’s almost like ISPs penny pinch until any substantial competition comes along!

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    I have Earthlink here with 70Mbps with my own modem for $41/month with no cap. i originally started with 15Mbps and have been bumped up for free throughout the years. Bought my own modem after year one and it paid itself off in 5 months. I was being charged $9 a month to rent.

    • travbrad
    • 3 years ago

    Up until recently I had no cap but now Comcast has the 1TB cap here. It’s a pretty generous cap but I still think the way they are implemented is a bit silly. There should be “free” GBs in off-peak hours for example. If the idea is supposedly to prevent network congestion/slowdowns then that should only be an issue during peak Netflix/torrenting hours.

    Plus their meter either sucks or is deliberately wrong.

    • Shinare
    • 3 years ago

    AT&T Uverse here with 1TB data cap.

    I “cut the cable” in February this year and turned to streaming only. Three family members and all 6 TV’s have a Roku stick. I hover around the 650MB per month range so far.

    • Zyphos
    • 3 years ago

    I’m assuming the poll is for residential service. I have a plan via Cox Business because I do have business needs. No data caps. Though I do believe the residential plans here (Omaha, NE) are not capped currently.

    • elmopuddy
    • 3 years ago

    200/30 business class, no cap.. excellent service too.

    VidΓ©otron in MontrΓ©al, for those interested.

    • Lord.Blue
    • 3 years ago

    Texas. I don’t have a data cap, but I do have crappy service to go along with that.
    Access Media 3 is who I’m stuck with, and for $59.99 I get a 30mbps connection that drops almost every night. Yay apartment monopolies!

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    The reality is that companies like google and facebook are going to eventually supplant the likes of the current infrastructure holders because they don’t want their product and service or their partners bottle necked… matter of fact facebook is working on spreading internet to the third world and google fiber is slowly conquering america.

    I love the free market.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      The problem is Facebook wanted to provide a limited “internet” with access to many Facebook services and a few others, which would have led tens of millions of people to believe that /was/ the internet, strangling out Asian social media competitors.

      Like the Indian government was wise to call out, if they wanted to provide the internet, provide access to the entire internet and add a data cap if they don’t have the resources for unlimited yet. You can’t create a large intranet a-la North Korea (not to say they’re remotely similar) and call it the Internet like they do.

      • oldog
      • 3 years ago

      Not net neutral, no?

    • SuperSpy
    • 3 years ago

    Ironically when I moved to a place that wasn’t supported by $telco, I actually got an upgrade in service speed by switching to a local WISP.

    According to my router, I transferred just under 700 GB last month .

    I’d never be able to even reach that with the crappy 3MBit “high speed” DSL Frontier offered at my old address.

    • fellix
    • 3 years ago

    In my place (an EU state), I can get 100/50 Mbit fiber service for ~$20 a month (non-promo price), with free Wi-Fi router for new subscribers, no data caps (those died here with the dial-up many years ago), no restrictions on hosting servers, no traffic prioritization and no protocol throttling.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Westminster (central London):

    38Mbit/s asymmetric for Β£17/month ($22) but the internet is perpetually free as part of a 1-year introductory offer that you have to leave and rejoin for as long as you pay the Β£17/month line rental.

    • webkido13
    • 3 years ago

    1 gigabit symmetric for the equivalent of $65 with no cap in Switzerland. Can’t complain. No downtime in years either.

    The parents-in-law in South Carolina pay $65 for 15/1mbit (no cap, but mit 15mbit you would not get far). I was shocked when I saw that amount on their bill for what they get.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, internet speeds here in the US are generally slower than they have any right to be for the price. Something about getting a century old infrastructure updated. Don’t ask about AT&T DSL prices.

    • Jigar
    • 3 years ago

    No caps but i am currently on 2 mbps line πŸ™

    • Zizy
    • 3 years ago

    The best I could get is 2Gbit symmetric, but I get by with 10Mbit fine enough, though I am considering upgrading to 100Mbit.
    No caps I would know of. A friend was asked some questions as he was constantly at about 20TB/month. He still wasn’t throttled though.

    • DarkUltra
    • 3 years ago

    There are many housing communities hete in Norway that owns the fiber network infrastructure. This way sevrtal ISPs compete over the same cable. Then you can just switch if one starts to cap or throttle your line. Some even provides several static IPs and IPv6 to stand out.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 3 years ago

      I’m under the impression that Telenor/C.D. is a dominant and not very price-competitive provider for those who are not so fortunate as to have fiber. I don’t think Norway’s prices are particularly enviable overall. Feel free to correct me.

    • iBend
    • 3 years ago

    capped 300GB or 500GB (not sure since I never hit it)
    but unlimited traffic for netflix and other stream site

    • kmieciu
    • 3 years ago

    I remember 15 yrs ago there were some ISP-s that had data cap plans but they quickly got rid of the caps or went out of the market – they simply could not stand a fight with those who did not have caps in the first place.
    Nowadays data caps are back but only on cellular, and even those are ‘bottleneck after limit’ rather than ‘overcharge after limit’ becouse literally nobody was buing the latter.

    • SoundChaos
    • 3 years ago

    Idaho – I’m in one of the biggest cities in the state, only one service provider not including satellite, no unlimited packages.

    We can get gigabit internet, but its capped at 500gb data (1 hour of max download speed per month?) and the 100mb down speed package at $60 a month is the minimum with 250gb data. All packages have outrageous packet loss and terrible ping average of 120-180ms even on game servers in the same state, so many online games are not an option. Downtime 1-2 times a day for 2-4 hours every day.

    Centurylink used to serve unlimited DSL a couple years ago, but their max speed was 1.5mbs and they since stopped servicing my area.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 years ago

      I was stuck with Century Link for several years in Utah at 12 Mbps and I never got disconnects. And with that speed you never had to be concerned with reaching a data cap.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 3 years ago

    You guys are lucky. There are no unlimited packages where I live.

    Fixed line 40 Mbps, 90GB per month but only 45 GB during peak hours. Moment I pass the 45GB the speed drops to 2 Mbps and when 90GB is up it drops to 64 kbps!!! Cost me about $20 per month.

    Laptop (dongle) 100GB at a theortical max of 42 Mbps but the speed throttles heavily. No peak hour limitations, but I hardly ever get over 8 Mbps and that package costs me over $100 per month using current exchange rates. I am going to throw out this connection end of this month.

      • Noinoi
      • 3 years ago

      A 42 Mbps mobile dongle is probably HSPA+. In my experience HSPA+ only gets anywhere near the rated speed under ideal conditions and tends to hover around the 10-20 Mbps range; your 8 Mbps is on the low side, but still relatively acceptable for something that isn’t 4G LTE.

      The fixed line is rather bad πŸ™ An effective 45 GB is just way too limiting for any fixed connection in my opinion.

      And yep, giving up on the laptop broadband is probably a good idea, especially if a competitor is offering you much better speeds/rates.

    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    I could get a 1 GBps fiber, symmetric up/down link, no cap, ~$160 per month with telephone and basic TV (no fancy channels or UHD).

    I’m so cheap that I currently have a 10MBps down/1Mbps up VDSL for $50/mo. No cap.

    Despite the absence of cap, I believe that in both cases 100% activity 24/7 will probably be considered abuse, but not aware of anyone who was actually terminated for abuse. They just don’t want enterprise grade service passing over home-grade subscriptions. If there is a secret cap, it’s probably absurdly high (1TB/mo or more).

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 years ago

      Are saying GBps or Gbps?

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      1GB/s would be 8x faster than Google Fiber, I think you wanted a little ‘b’ πŸ˜›

    • sreams
    • 3 years ago

    100Mbps up and down for $49.95/mo locked in for 2 years. No caps. Consolidated Fiber in Sacramento, CA. Great, reliable service.

    • Airmantharp
    • 3 years ago

    Time Warner, basic high-speed (50Mbps, I think), no caps- and they don’t really enforce the speed limit. Honestly this is about the best service I’ve had in Texas so far.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      TWC is now Spectrum after they got bought by Charter…

        • w76
        • 3 years ago

        So is BrightHouse Networks, or will be eventually… BHN is still producing new ads under that brand, but occasionally refers to itself as Spectrum… Confusing situation for the moment, would be easier if they made a clean break.

        • Airmantharp
        • 3 years ago

        The conversion is more or less complete (I’m getting ‘Spectrum’ mail now), but I say this because it started as TW and the service hasn’t really changed (from excellent). If you had some other service before a Charter takeover, that may not be the case.

    • ClickClick5
    • 3 years ago

    Alaska here. 100 Mb down, 5 Mb up, 300GB cap (down and up count, not just down), $139 a month.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      That is expensive!

        • ClickClick5
        • 3 years ago

        I have no other option! Hughs Net? It would have to be dish based and with the weather here…no go.

        • Krogoth
        • 3 years ago

        Internet access has always been expensive for remote parts of the world. Alaska is no exception.

    • number58
    • 3 years ago

    One thing Charter doesn’t suck for, no caps. I might never see down speeds over 30mbps, but at least I don’t have to worry about how much I use.

    • rhema83
    • 3 years ago

    My previous ISP didn’t have a data cap or bandwidth throttling. It undercut its competitors on price and became immensely popular. Predictably, it was dreadfully slow during peak hours. I could get the promised 100Mbps both ways at 7:30am on a Monday, but I could barely reach 15Mbps at 9pm.

    I got frustrated and looked for a new ISP when the contract ended. This time I went for a boutique fiber ISP marketed to businesses and high-end gamers. The subscription costs much more but I was promised 600Mbps both ways at any hour – no cap, no throttling, business-class network capacity. The ISP delivered its goods, even when it became more popular as word spread. I’m still getting a very snappy >400Mbps connection while the ISP upgrades its capacity. It promised to bump me up to the 1Gbps tier upon contract renewal, at the same low price of $50/mth.

    I often bemoan the price of hardware in my locale (e.g. $50 higher than Newegg for graphics cards) but after reading this article and the discussion here, I guess I should count myself lucky. It’s way more frustrating to pay more for a crappy internet connection than to shell out extra dough once in a few years for hardware.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 3 years ago

    1TB or 600GB cap on DSL, 0 cap on LTE. I just don’t get it.

    • dikowexeyu
    • 3 years ago

    My ISP intercepts all my DNS traffic.

    He also replaces ads with his own ads, and it slows all my browsing, create lags, and cause websites to think that I’m blocking his ads (I do have an ad blocker, but whitelisting the websites I want to help only “helps ” my ISP).

    I tried to encrypt my DNS, but the only solution available is a script, complex to setup, and which does not works very well. Sometimes breaks completely, to the point that the only way to get Internet back is to re install the entire OS.

      • Pholostan
      • 3 years ago

      OpenNIC usually has some servers that have encrypted DNS. Check: [url<]https://servers.opennicproject.org/[/url<] I've been using them, slower than some other DNS, but much more private.

      • iBend
      • 3 years ago

      My ISP also does that ads replacing things… it even have strict site sensoring (cant even open 9gag or some manga site)

      I rent a cheap VPS, and use it as SSH server.. and everything is fine now πŸ˜€

    • NovusBogus
    • 3 years ago

    Poll needs a “I shun society and the Internet and have no idea if there’s a cap” option.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    I have charter now, but Comcrap had me on a 300GB limit in Indiana. That was rough. It was just me and the wife with a wee one at the time. I’m afraid to know what I’m at these days with a4 and 11 year old with Roku and tablets for each

    • Vaughn
    • 3 years ago

    I haven’t had to deal with capped connections for a few years now.

    In Canada on a 250/20 unlimited Connection which I pay $75 a month for.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Data caps have been the unfortunate reality of internet service for residential-tier ever since broadband became mainstream for the masses in regions that don’t have massive government subsidies (Japan, South Korea, certain EU members).

    Telecommunication industry is just trying to prevent “tragedy of the commons” at the last mile. The only reason residential-tier “fiber services” don’t have data caps yet is because the userbase at the last mile is still relatively small just like the other broadband services were back in their infancy. It will take a while for a similar situation to appear for residential types with fiber service since it has a lot more headroom then most other broadband solutions and there’s no killer mainstream application that requires “TiBs” worth of bandwidth yet.

    I never had a problem with the 250GiB cap from Communistcast but then again I don’t go nuts with video streaming services or torrenting/sharing certain materials. I suspect their recent bump to 1TiB was due to growing threat of FTTH services in USA and “classic” cable business model is starting to wane (a.k.a more and more people are cutting the cord for their TV). I feel that most other mainstream users are in a similar position. It is the minority in the 70%+ percentile range that are feeling the pain with data caps.

    For that minority, most ISPs want you to upgrade to their “business-tier” plans since in their eyes they feel that are you some kind of business or non-profit base on your massive bandwidth consumption.

    • Noinoi
    • 3 years ago

    This is probably not very relevant to most of you, but over here in Malaysia, I get by with a 4 Mbps ADSL connection (512 kbps upload). It’s kind of slow for large downloads and any uploading, but it mostly works, and it has no caps. Not that you’d find caps on anything other than mobile broadband here, anyway.

    • SoberAddiction
    • 3 years ago

    Verizon FiOS in Va. Bch. No caps here!

    • Acidicheartburn
    • 3 years ago

    Comcast JUST sent me a friendly letter telling me how sorry they are that I now have a 1 TB /month data cap but that it shouldn’t affect me. Realistically it shouldn’t because I don’t usually come close to that, but I am nonetheless FURIOUS. The level of greed with ISP’s is insane.

      • isotope123
      • 3 years ago

      Bruh, don’t move to Canada. Data caps average around a quarter of that in Ontario.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      Would you rather pay 2-3 times as much to support building lots more telco infrastructure that, by your own admission, you don’t actually need? What they’re doing is basically a more extreme version of discount airlines like Southwest overselling seats, can’t have it both ways.

      • adamlongwalker
      • 3 years ago

      Same here. The problem is that Comcast will not stop there. Sooner or later they will lower the bandwidth, as they are somewhat known to bait and switch cable content.

      And you wonder why they are one of the most hated companies in America.

      • GatoRat
      • 3 years ago

      Putting aside the dubious quality of metering software, the caps are being put into place due a small percentage of people who go massively over what most people would consider reasonable use. This applies to cell phones as well. Live in an area where a few users are saturating the bandwidth and you’ll rethink your furiosity.

    • bluebadger
    • 3 years ago

    No, I can move all the data I want per month –

    but ONLY because I pay extra for the unlimited bandwidth option.

    I’m paying over 100 CAD a month for about 250 down/20 up on cable.

      • spiritwalker2222
      • 3 years ago

      Ya, I choose not to pay that much and am capped to 100 GB for uploading and downloading combined. I upgraded my service not to increase my bandwidth, but to increase my cap to that 100 GB (from 60 GB).

    • cygnus1
    • 3 years ago

    I’m on AT&T gigabit fiber service with no cap. It’s pretty damn solid.

    • Mikael33
    • 3 years ago

    Just got an email that Comcast is back to enforcing data caps, but now it’s that 1024GB one, so should be pretty hard to go over it, according to Netmeter the most I’ve ever downloaded in one month was 629GB since January of this year, must have streamed a lot of 4k Netflix πŸ˜‰

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      The worst part about the whole thing is that the monitoring they do is absolutely dreadful and inaccurate. I so want someone to create a botnet that just sends junk packets to all Comcast customers (to run up the “data usage”) just to prove that point. It only takes 380 KB/s to run out a terabyte in a month.

      I know I’d probably never notice a few stray Mbps on downloads being gone…

        • Mikael33
        • 3 years ago

        I forget, does their data monitor count upload and download as one?
        I’ve gone above their old pitiful 320GB~ cap 3 or 4 times even before they upgraded my area to Docsis 3, went from 12mb/s (sustained, 16 burst irrc) to 75mb/down, upload is still 12mb though, not that I care. They over provision though, so I get 80-95mbps down(with terrible buffer bloat), I was wondering if my 20$ router was bottlenecking me (100mb) but it sadly doesn’t increase speeds at all direct with a 1gbps connection.

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          Looks like both ways, but it’s impossible to tell for me since the meter is broken on their site.

            • Mikael33
            • 3 years ago

            Broken enough that every Comcast customer should try to use over 1TB of bandwidth and claim ignorance? πŸ™‚

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            Broken in that it won’t display for me at all. “There’s an error displaying the page content, please try again later”.

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    While I don’t have a “cap” issue, I sure have a “throttling” issue.

    -the first is repugnant enough to terminate service IMO.

    -the later is just annoying, and I’m to much of a “sheep” to really get p!ssy about it..

    Still, considering how much money they are making off of all of us it wouldn’t be difficult to actually upgrade their systems (or unreasonable to do so).

    They really are making a F***Load of money, and that’s not just revenue – they are making a huge amount NET! (..hmm, is that a F***Load of NET-NET?)

      • davidbowser
      • 3 years ago

      I have two connections at home (Comcast cable and CenturyLink dsl) and I am pretty certain they BOTH throttle, but don’t cap. Some things work on Centurylink even though it is a slower connection, and other things don’t work at all (Centurylink is a repeat offender with throttling Netflix).

      Just last night I was getting disconnected while trying to download an iso on Comcast, and I switched it off at the router and Centurylink worked fine with the exact same download. I even have my own internal DNS caching, so I know it was either throttled or filtered.

    • meerkt
    • 3 years ago

    Are these caps on download only?

      • tacitust
      • 3 years ago

      Most upload speeds are 1/10th or less the download rate, so even if uploads are factored in, they’re not likely to be the issue for the vast majority of customers.

        • meerkt
        • 3 years ago

        I upload more than I download, and my up speed is an order of magnitude slower.

        The article implies indirectly that only downstream is counted, so I wonder how it works with various ISPs.

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          As far as I’m aware, all the major ISPs with caps will meter all bits transferred over the wire, regardless of direction or if it’s overhead. What is overhead you may ask? Overhead in this since is all the extra data required to packet-ize your data data; ie. packet headers, device management, re-transmits (most often due to faulty equipment or crap lines), etc. Depending on what you’re doing with your connection and the quality of that connection, that overhead can be anywhere from 2 or 3 percent to many multiple 100’s of percent of your actual data usage. There was an article on Ars recently that I can’t find now, but it was about people getting hit with multiple TB overages and the “experts” basically pointed to a marginal connection that was constantly retransmitting and the data meter counting the retransmits against their cap.

          Little more info about network overhead: [url<]http://www.tamos.net/~rhay/wp/overhead/overhead.htm[/url<]

      • trek205
      • 3 years ago

      Mine says it is the total for download and upload.

      And thanks to the shitty Microsoft store and the GoW 4 clusterfuck, I have now gone over my cap for the month and still do not have the game installed…

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      They are metered in using both ways. That’s why torrent users tend to hit the limits rather quickly.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 3 years ago

    TWC or Charter or whatever still sucks in Rochester, NY. No caps tho, so I guess that is something. 88/month for 50/5. Which is the pits. They have a fiber company here called Greenlight Networks, but it is slow going. 50/month for 100/20. 100/month for 1000/100! *drool* I’ll never see it as I live in the “country”.

    No TV or phone. I get them free by other means.

    I know this is a first world problem for me, so I’ll be graceful I have internet at all.

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    None of the choices in the poll are applicable for people affected by Comcast’s new 1TB cap.

      • adampk17
      • 3 years ago

      I had to read the options twice too but I believe he meant for “Yes, and I can transfer less than a terabyte per month” to represent Comcasts new limit.

    • kleinwl
    • 3 years ago

    The only reason that I don’t have caps is that I avoid caps at all costs. I turn down offers from AT&T, Comcast, or whomever in order to avoid caps. I unbundle my internet and TV, or go with the small 3rd party. It typically costs more, but I can’t stand the idea of being capped.

    • NeelyCam
    • 3 years ago

    I want data charges based on usage. Small base fee (e.g., $10/mo) plus say $5/100GB.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Dream on. It’ll never happen because the ISPs would make significantly less money that way.

        • NeelyCam
        • 3 years ago

        Isn’t competition supposed to achieve something like that though?

        Oh, silly me.

        It’s interesting how differently this all works in a socialist country like Norway.

          • w76
          • 3 years ago

          I could do amazing stuff with a tiny homogeneous population and vast natural resources, too.

          Edit: I had to research Norway more, which just proves the point that socialist countries ultimately abandon that insanity and move more towards market economies in all the ways they think they can. See the other comment here about how they essentially seem to have open final mile infrastructure over which others compete. The US could pry open the final mile in a single long weekend of legislating — if they wanted.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            You have no idea of the challenges associated with living in Norway. For example the need to blast or chisel rock for almost every meaningful building project. You should see the roads. Tunnels, roundabouts in tunnels, tunnels that spiral over themselves, bridges that both begin and end with tunnels into mountainsides. That on top of that, they want to grow their own food. Compare and contrast to Alaska. Everything imported, no money saved, the whole place running at the expense of the other states. Norway as a nation will exist in 100 years, in 200 years.

            And of course the socialist democracies of scandinavia are also free market economies, they’re not stupid. πŸ˜‰

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            Also, cut out that crap about “tiny population” and look at the size of the land. Low population density doesn’t make fast internet easier.

            Also take a peek at Denmark, like Norway but smaller, mud instead of rock, and no particular natural resources except for that mud. Pretty impressive result.

          • Freon
          • 3 years ago

          Norway is the UAE of Europe. Horrible comparison.

      • brucek2
      • 3 years ago

      That seems like a poor fit for the actual cost structure of providing service, which involves a lot of fixed costs for running the wires, the associated the gear, the support staff and facilities, and then what is a relatively pretty tiny amount of variable charge for the data that passes through those wires. I don’t believe your proposed base fee would actually support the cost of providing service at the low end, while meanwhile it’d also force all consumers to pay a lot of attention to data usage, while incurring a lot of “overage” charges for usage increments that aren’t even rounding errors on actual costs incurred, while impeding investment in and usage of services delivered over the net. Sounds like lose lose lose all around.

    • Renko
    • 3 years ago

    Local fiber internet Lightspeed. 1Gbps up and down and no cap.

    Actually my service was down for the first time since I got it back in May yesterday. I texted Lightspeed, got a reply in 10 minutes saying something was wrong specifically with my connection…took a nap and woke up an hour later to a text saying everything was fixed (which it was).

    I was with Comcast for 10 years in multiple states before this switch. Cancelling my service with them in May was the happiest day of my internet life. Now if only I had an excuse for my .25 k/d ratio….9ms latency doesn’t make me any better at fps games haha. (Played MMOs exclusively for 13 years…I am working on the adjustment!)

    • [+Duracell-]
    • 3 years ago

    TWC: $65/mo for 50/5, but I regularly get a bit higher (usually ~60/6). It’s been a bit flaky where I’m at lately, in terms of latency and download speeds. No data caps yet, though (thankfully).

    Too bad I can’t get Wide Open West. 60/5 is $55/mo, or I can go much faster for more (110/10 for $70, 300/20 for $90/mo, or 600/40 for $100/mo). They don’t service my address, though, and the 50/5 tier is the highest tier TWC offers in my area πŸ™

    • NeelyCam
    • 3 years ago

    Frontier. 30/30 for $35/mo (and if they will ever recognize I am actually autopaying, it would be $30/mo). No cap.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 3 years ago

    Most of the ISPs in the UK have gone away from hard caps and towards throttling. The packages with hard caps tend to be rather low (100GB and less).

    Over the last few years the capacity has increased though, and these days I’m finding a lot of packages would be effectively unlimited for the sort of low hundreds of gigabytes I’d use.

    • Buub
    • 3 years ago

    Frontier FiOS –
    The good: No caps, they generally stay out of my way
    The bad: Run by clueless monkeys (just like Comcast), things occasionally randomly go wrong and require clueless monkeys to fix
    (Note: I’m on the small business plan so I can have static IPs)

      • MagariNegi
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve got their consumer line. No caps and consistent speed. Every once in a while the neighborhood goes down but they seem fairly quick to repair it. I’ve only got the 35/15 though.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve had both Frontier and Comcast and honestly, Frontier is orders of magnitude more clueless and less reliable than Comcast. They’re pulling off the impossible.

    • w76
    • 3 years ago

    Brighthouse (absorbed by Charter), currently a teaser rate of $35/mo for 100/10, no cap. 11 more months and it’ll more than double in price, though. Where I just moved from not far away had just got AT&T fiber, so… c’mon, 11 months AT&T, get moving.

    • morphine
    • 3 years ago

    What’s a data cap? πŸ˜‰

    Currently on Vodafone 200/200Mbit fiber, ~58€/mo for that plus TV, landline, one mobile phone. And the company’s now offering 100/100Mbit triple-play for 29€/mo., or 1Gbit/100Mbit (yes, you read that right) triple-play for 39€/mo.

      • meerkt
      • 3 years ago

      Nice.

      • lmc5b
      • 3 years ago

      Love my Vodafone too. Before that 29€/month 100/100, they were offering a 200/20 that I got, still feel that I got the better deal as I never need more than 20 up but in Steam downloads I have maxed out my 200 down.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Comcast will cap by November, looking at alternatives right now.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    I asked my broadband provider about caps when we switched. At the time they told me they had no plans to do it, in part because their main competition (Comcast) does and they want to attract new business by going without a cap. So far (two years later) they’ve stuck to it and I hope they continue to do so.

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    I’m on a 300 Mbit down from Time Warner…. I mean Charter service. Since I’m in a Google Fiber area (but who hasn’t rolled out to my address yet), I pay $75/month and no cap.

    Lets just say they are very, very desperate to keep customers here.

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      And people say competition doesn’t work.

        • kleinwl
        • 3 years ago

        Every large monopoly agrees – competition doesn’t work.

    • Devils41
    • 3 years ago

    Cox communications here usage limit is at 700GB per month, I use data cap loosely as they wont charge you if you go over once or twice but warn you and then charge you if you are a repeat offender.

    • superjawes
    • 3 years ago

    Moved to Tucson and had a 250GB cap. Hit it twice.

    I think we got the 1TB cap in June and we haven’t had a problem since, but I’m still not happy about it.

    • tacitust
    • 3 years ago

    Not capped myself, but wanted to post the obligatory plug for Stop The Cap, that’s been fighting the good fight against data caps (and other anti-consumer measures) for over a decade now:

    [url<]http://stopthecap.com/[/url<]

    • Thrashdog
    • 3 years ago

    Ah ha ha ha ha!

    GOOGLE FIBER, SUCKERS! The Internet is on my LAN.

    HA HAHAHAH HA!

    • xeridea
    • 3 years ago

    $65 for 75Mbit ScamCast, 300 gig cap
    ATT fiber just moved in to my neighborhood, probably will switch to gigabit for $70, with 1 terabyte cap. I have never hit 300 gig cap, but caps are dumb anyways.

    • Spyrano
    • 3 years ago

    Got a 400GB Cox soft-cap. They just notify me if I exceed it, no fees or throttling though.

      • Blazex
      • 3 years ago

      they don’t even notify me if i hit my 250 “cap”, it used to be 100ish before the speed upgrades for new high speed classification, but i constantly kept exceeding it.

      at this point i think they have one to say so… not like anyone really believed they had one when the whole cap fiasco’s started happening.

    • astrotech66
    • 3 years ago

    I’m paying $60/month for 200 Mb/s down from Spectrum (formerly Time Warner Cable, now part of Charter) here in Texas. I think as part of gaining approval for the Charter-TWC merger, they had to promise not to institute data caps, so I’m feeling pretty happy about that. One less thing to worry about.

      • arbiter9605
      • 3 years ago

      Yea they are required to adhere to net neutrality rules and no cap for least 7 years

    • DrDominodog51
    • 3 years ago

    I still have one month before the Comcast data cap hits me, and I’m going to download [b<]everything[/b<] before that. (insert meme of Alison Brie in Community here)

    • Bensam123
    • 3 years ago

    Nope. One good thing about charter, no caps. They haven’t updated their speeds in forever, but the service itself is pretty solid.

    That being said I just got a much needed speed boost on my upload from 4.2mbps to 5.8. is still not bonded though for some strange reason which causes latency issues of you try using alot of it, say for streaming.

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      Should be bonded, sounds like a modem or signal issue? (I worked there 3 or 4 years ago, all areas were supposed to have bonded channels and they’d just rolled out mandatory new DOCSIS3 modems)

        • Bensam123
        • 3 years ago

        It’s not. Confirmed in my mode, a new modem, and across dslreports.

        It supports bonded upstream, it’s just not turned on.

          • w76
          • 3 years ago

          That’s something they can probably fix then, if you pester them enough and care enough. Unfortunately, my experience with them was wide incompetence in many geographical regions in terms of technicians, and some of their call centers were staffed with people barely literate (and I don’t mean English as a second language, I mean I don’t know how those people graduated high school). Some were great, though. Hit or miss.

            • Bensam123
            • 3 years ago

            It’s normal for all charter customers. It’s not something local just specifically in my area.

            From what I understand this probably wont change till they start rolling out Docsis 3.1

      • arbiter9605
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t have really any latency issues when uploading at max, but when dling at max i see latency spike to like 700-800ms, upload only causes it to spike to 100-150.

        • Bensam123
        • 3 years ago

        Both do it for me, especially upload. There is some weird sort of delay on packets, bufferbloat in particular. Check out dslreports speed test.

    • Concupiscence
    • 3 years ago

    DFW area, AT&T here, and I’m capped at a terabyte per month. Initially they were rolling out a 650 gig cap, but for some reason they backed off. I can’t believe they get away with it.

      • brucethemoose
      • 3 years ago

      AT&T is the devil here in DFW. The cap is the least of my problems TBH… my internet likes to just randomly cut out for short periods, for example.

      There’s a reason it’s called “AT&T Stadium”.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        …because they bought the naming rights? πŸ˜‰

          • brucethemoose
          • 3 years ago

          Yes… for $18+ million a year, which they can easily afford thanks to their monopoly here.

        • trek205
        • 3 years ago

        Ours used to go out for just a minute or two a couple times a week. For the last month or so it does that little “reset” several times a day. My father says he gets the same thing and he lives in different state even. The worst thing about ATT is the way they throttle youtube especially during peak hours as then I am lucky to get 720p to play without buffering like crazy even though we have 24 meg.

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