Thermaltake Black FP mouse takes aim at security

Thermaltake's new Black FP mouse offers lazy and the paranoid gamers a new way to log into their PC. The Black FP mouse adds a FIDO UAF-certified fingerprint sensor to an otherwise conventional gaming mouse.

Synaptics provides the headlining biometric fingerprint sensor, which employs the touchpad manufacturer's "Iron Veil" technology. Thermaltake claims the  included software makes it easy for users to register their fingerprints for securely logging into Windows and websites. The manufacturer says the sensor is compatible with Windows 10's Security Center, allowing for biometric-authenticated file encryption and decryption.

Gamers are doubtless more interested in the Black FP's sensors and switches. An Avago 9500 optical sensor can handle up movements up 150 inches per second and allows selectable sensitivity up to 5,700 DPI. Thermaltake touts Omron switches with 5 million click rated lifespan, though this probably only applies to the two main switches, not the full complement of seven buttons.

The Black FP's body measures 4.8" x 2.7" x 1.6" (121mm x 69mm x 41mm) and contains five pockets for 4.5-g weights. Lighting, macros, profiles, and lift-off settings can be configured with Thermaltake's Command Center software. Thermaltake kindly requests $60 in exchange for the mouse.

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    • TwistedKestrel
    • 3 years ago

    This is [url=https://www.amazon.ca/Iogear-3BTN-Biometric-Fingerprint-Mouse/dp/B000RPXC0I<]coming[/url<] around [url=https://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Wireless-IntelliMouse-Explorer-Fingerprint/dp/B0002IHP44<]again[/url<]? Granted, the framework(s) to make these things actually useful didn't exist a decade ago...

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    A universal Windows and web standard could really help reduce the impact of password dumps from sites if the FIDO stuff takes off. For only $60 I think it’s a no brainier.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      Fingerprints can be obtained and faked. Lots of ways I can think of on how to improve the security of that, but all of it at a possibly substantial increase in price.

        • TwistedKestrel
        • 3 years ago

        Sure, it’s not completely secure. But at this point, passwords are definitely not secure either, at least not in the way that we generally have to use them.

          • Redocbew
          • 3 years ago

          Once an attacker has physical access to a machine it’s usually game over anyway. If these scanners became common it would stop people running to the help desk about forgot passwords, but there would still need to be an alternate login for the IT folks who manage the machines using them.

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            100% this.

            Fingerprint logins provide only the [i<]illusion[/i<] of security whilst in reality they provide significant technical hurdles related to connecting remotely and allowing support to help you if needed.

            • DragonDaddyBear
            • 3 years ago

            2 factor authentication has real benefits, especially when working with sensitive external interfaces of the network that grant internal access (VPN, Citrix, VMWare, etc.).

            It can make support difficult to deal with, I agree. In cases of regulated data it’s typically worth the cost (money and time) in an enterprise. I wouldn’t recommended it for everyone, though.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 3 years ago

        The modern version of my Logitech G500, the G502, costs more than this thing.

        Yes, you can fake a fingerprint. But that usually requires physical access to a sample. That works great on a fingerprint-prone iPhone. In a breach, though, you don’t have that sample to copy. It’s a second factor that, in theory, would be harder to crack than a password (given the commonality between passwords). That greatly increases the time and complexity considerably. It’s WAY better than just a password.

        • deniro444
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, there’s a whole bunch of fingerprint faking sweeping the nation.

        • Andrew Lauritzen
        • 3 years ago

        As needs to be frequently said in all of these discussions… it’s a pin to unlock your *local* certificates, not a “password” that gets sent remotely (or even stored in a recoverable way locally if everything is working properly).

        Everything over the internet should just be strong encrypted certificates – it’s computers talking to computers, it’s silly that we ever allowed “passwords” to be sent and stored remotely.

        Things like fingerprint readers and windows hello and “pins” are just about making it convenient to unlock your local machine while we simultaneously make it infeasible for anyone who doesn’t have access to your physical machine to do *anything* remotely. That’s a *significant* improvement over today even if there was literally zero security on your local machine.

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