HyperX Alloy keyboard gets lean and mean for FPS gaming

If you're like me, you prize your keyboard's numeric keypad and use it daily. Still, nobody likes to give up a bunch of desk space to an oversized keyboard. HyperX's new Alloy "FPS Gaming" keyboard attempts to satisfy both of these requirements. The company says that the Alloy's almost-borderless design gives FPS gamers more room for mousing. HyperX's cut-down design is also blissfully free of cladding or other gaudy "gaming" features that we usually dread from gamer-branded gear.

The space savings from HyperX's scalpel-wielding look pretty minimal to our eyes, but the keyboard's Cherry MX Blue switches should provide a characteristically solid typing experience. The solid steel frame could minimize keyboard flex during high-adrenaline gaming sessions, and the keyboard's red backlight will provide eyestrain-free usability in the dark for people who still aren't touch-typing. The Alloy has a USB port on the back that HyperX calls a "charging port," so gamers can likely keep their phones close without worrying about battery life, too.

HyperX says the Alloy FPS Gaming keyboard can already be found at retail and e-tail shops where its products are sold. We found it here at Newegg for the suggested $99.

Comments closed
    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Pfft, real men use Model Ms….

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    I already have a decent mechanical keyboard but damn, this looks nice.

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      Agree.

    • jihadjoe
    • 3 years ago

    Are the keys actually made of metal?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      They are not, sadly. Considering that sets of aluminum keycaps are usually in the range of a hundred bucks (and that’s just for A-Z and numbers) it’s not that surprising nobody has made a proper metal keyboard.

        • Oem
        • 3 years ago

        Does anyone in the universe currently sell full sets of aluminum keycaps? I just searched around and it seems there was only one ever sold, a one time custom manufacturing run ordered by a Korean enthusiast nicknamed scarface. AFAICT this concept is impossible to purchase new at this time.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          I’ve only ever seen them on eBay and Amazon, which leads me to believe that they were individuals reselling theirs (either new or used.) I don’t think anyone does sell metal keycaps of any sort as a regular product. Shame, really.

    • christos_thski
    • 3 years ago

    [s<]Corsair[/s<] Kingston should advertise these keyboards on how easy they are to clean on account of the raised keys (instead of the usual recessed key "plate"). It's a relatively unsung advantage.

      • Oem
      • 3 years ago

      Actually this is the reason I put away my $200+ Corsair mechanical keyboard after 6 months of trying to get used to it, and switched back to my trusty beige mechanical Northstar Omni Ultra-T clone.

      I’ve been typing for around 34 years, and type pretty fast, mostly touch, but I learned I subconsciously use visual cues to home my hands frequently. Which would be fine except on a black, lighted keyboard, with a gap beneath the keys, at least in the Corsair design, a lot of light leaks between and under the keys (and reflects off the monitor too). This provides visual confusion in peripheral vision, and throws off the subconscious learned map of the keyboard and ability to place the hands in the right position without thinking.

      Upshot is a lot more typing errors, and slower typing speed in general, even after 6 months of use. I measured the old and new keyboards, thinking maybe the keys were smaller or spaced closer (that’s how it feels), but the measurements are exactly the same. I can only conclude that the lighting + raising is a combination that will never work for me.

      Now I have to find a solution, like filling in that gap somehow, or sell the keyboard.

    • RoxasForTheWin
    • 3 years ago

    Two things I wish they did here.
    1. This one wasn’t clear in the article so it may be a feature, but I’d rather use that “charging” usb as a mouse pass through (would be good if it could do both though!)

    2. I know Red is considered for a staple for gaming, but I still would rather have a white backlight so I could bring this into an office without looking too much like a G4mer

      • Ninjitsu
      • 3 years ago

      I’d rather have a red backlight tbh, it indeed should cause less eye strain.

      (I should probably mention that I’d only ever consider turning the lights off while playing night missions in Arma where NVGs aren’t provided – gets hard to see with a glossy monitor screen).

      (and try touch typing your way through Arma or DCS 😛 )

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      White in a dark room hurts my eyes, anything I buy gotta be long wavelength. This sort of thing is why RGB keyboards are the future, everyone gets what they want. The Henry Ford school of design is fine when a product is new, but it doesn’t work when things start going mainstream.

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      Agree with you about white LED. Right now the only keyboard with White LED and Blue switches (on Newegg) is a CollerMaster, which doesn’t have a num pad.

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