Surface Studio puts the iMac on notice

The refreshed Surface Book i7 wasn't the only sleek, high-end system Microsoft trotted out at the company's Windows event this morning. The company unveiled its first desktop all-in-one system, the Surface Studio. The Studio appears to tweak the form factor of Apple's iMac and add extensive touchscreen input, much like the Surface Book does versus the MacBook Pro.

All models sport a 28", not-quite-5K 4500×3000 display with ten-point multi-touch input and extensive Surface Pen support. This panel can switch between sRGB and DCI P3 color gamuts on the fly for easy proofing of work that may be displayed in a different color gamut for its final output. The hardware components are stashed in the base of the unit, connected by a "Zero Gravity" hinge that allows the screen to lay nearly flat on the user's desk. The Studio's base spec level includes an unspecified sixth-generation Core i5 CPU, 8GB of RAM, an Nvidia GeForce GTX 965M card with 2GB of memory, and a 1TB SSD. The apex model ups the ante with a sixth-generation Core i7 CPU, 32GB of memory, a GeForce GTX 980M with 4GB of memory, and a 2TB SSD.

An optional Surface Dial rotary input device interacts with the touch screen to offer additional software functions in supported applications. Microsoft's demo prominently features a color palette springing onscreen when the Dial is touched to the screen.

That fancy display, hinge, and hardware specs don't come cheap. The base model is priced at $3000, while the top-of-the-line model will set buyers back $4200. Microsoft is taking preorders now, and expects to have units in customers' hands on December 15. The Surface Dial goes for $100 and should be available on November 10.

Comments closed
    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    So they are saying this thing experiences allot of slow down in 2D applications?

    What day and age are we in where 2D apps can’t run fluidly on any GPU of a current generation. Seriously this is getting ridiculous.

    • BigDDesign
    • 3 years ago

    This is something graphic artists dream about. Love how it it rests like a mechanical drawing board. Personally I would rather have this as just a monitor and then have a box connected to it. But this is one amazing feat that was kept under raps. Wow.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    I feel like this product just slapped apple across the face. They were officially caught with their pants down.

    I don’t work in this space anymore but if I was still an industrial designer this would be a must have product. Apple has always prided itself (for whatever reason) as being the platform for creatives (while having the most anti creative ironically) this looks amazing.

    • TEAMSWITCHER
    • 3 years ago

    A starting price of $3000 and no advanced connectivity like Thunderbolt. Same crap on the new Surface Book with Performance Base. Microsoft is collecting an Apple Tax, but leaving out the Apple Connectivity.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    [url=https://twitter.com/DrPizza/status/791656052219645952<]This[/url<]: @dotMorten Really don't get why the Studio PC isn't just a Monitor + great dock story for the existing Surface Book/Tablet. @DrPizza My initial reaction is to agree. This is what TB3 is crying out for (except, sigh, no TB3 on any Surface products).

    • NTMBK
    • 3 years ago

    $3000 luxury computer aimed at productivity. Only comes with a trial version of Office.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      1) Being Microsoft, I’d bet good money they’ll sell you a full copy of Office if you want it. Either way, you’re paying for that.

      2) I assume the majority these machines will end up at businesses, not homes. Most businesses have their own licences/keys for Office, so they’d rather not pay for another license they won’t use anyway.

    • Zizy
    • 3 years ago

    I was actually a bit underwhelmed, as I hoped for expandable base. Say the base only houses needed components, then you add another block with a powerful GPU, then yet another with extra storage, all connected using TB3. Would make the machine age much better.

    Now I just hope you will be able to replace just the base next year when they update components. Would be a shame to throw away such a gorgeous screen.

    Does anyone know how MS cools the thingy? Turbojet? 270W sounds a LOT from such a small box.

      • NTMBK
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Does anyone know how MS cools the thingy? Turbojet? 270W sounds a LOT from such a small box.[/quote<] Wormhole. They just dump all that excess energy into an adjacent brane.

    • One Sick Puppy
    • 3 years ago

    Ok, ok. I’ll admit that I was prepping up my cynicism before I clicked play. However, wow. I’m really impressed. That looks like a genuine effort to make a piece of hardware with standards as high and uncompromising as Apple.

    The nice thing about a Mac is that the OS is generally as elegant, stable and maintenance free as their hardware. I’m not sure Windows 10 is up to that standard.

    Sexy piece of hardware, no doubt about it.

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      The standards are much higher than Apple, considering how Apple goes years without refreshing their components. The industrial design is also both appealing and useful, instead of just compromising for appearance.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    I have serious reservations about a GTX 965M/980M driving a 4500×3000 display over the long haul.

    From a [url=https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/26/surface-studio-hands/<]hands on via TechCrunch[/url<]: [quote<]touch response slowed pretty close to a crawl when we drilled in super close [/quote<] 4GB max of GPU memory? Come on now.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      That’s actually a really good point.

      The second gen will probably be preferable due to gpu advances.

      Any design-heavy product from ms or Apple or what not is generally going to work that way.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      It is for 2D graphical editing/rendering not 3D graphical rendering/CAD/CAM. A lower-end Maxwell silicon with 4GiB of video memory is more than sufficient for the task.

      Get a real workstation if you want to do fancy 3D graphical rendering/editing/CAM/CAM.

        • End User
        • 3 years ago

        Apparently it struggles with 2D.

        I manage the IT department for a content creation house centred around Creative Suite. The Surface Studio is ideal for our employees but I don’t want to provide staff with a device that has performance issues on day one. How will this device perform 3 years from now if performance is an issue today? This thing should have shipped with a GTX 1xxx class GPU. Fortunately our new equipment timeline falls in line with the second gen Surface Studio.

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          I highly recommend you download some development tools and actually take a peak at the amount of memory your video card is using while in the middle of the CS workflows.

          Adobe does do some caching for the GPU accelerated compositing so it’ll be a fair amount higher than the raw frame buffer. Windows of course stores a buffer on an application by application basis too. However, a 4500 x 3000 display buffer is only 52 MB. Nearly 40 of those buffers can fit into a 2 GB card.

          From the article, the thing that slowed down the system was a zoom in on an image. I don’t think the cause of the image was a shortage of memory on the GPU but rather fill rate and/or rerendering complex vector graphics in conjunction with multiple layers. A smooth zoom requires redrawing the editing windows at 60 Hz, roughly 3 GB/s. Not bad by itself other than every later in an editing program also needs a pixel look up. With several high res layers mixed with vector graphics, being a bit slow on the draw isn’t unusual for a zoom. The real test is if it stays slow while zoomed in.

            • End User
            • 3 years ago

            One does not need developer tools to figure this out. A very quick test under Windows 10 demonstrates that a lowly 2560×1440 resolution will quickly approach 4GB of GPU memory usage (and no, I’m not talking about games). 4GB of GPU memory for a 4500×3000 equipped system is definitely not enough. Don’t even think about running a 2nd 4K/5K display.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            Are you sure that you aren’t running 3D renderings?

            2D renderings haven’t been video memory limited for quite some time unless you are handling a massive workload of lossless content. In that case, you are going to probably be looking at real workstation-tier hardware not some silly “iMac Pro” and “Surface Pro”.

            • End User
            • 3 years ago

            Silly Microsoft for making a silly “Pro” device.

            My silly test environment is a silly Windows 10 Pro rig running the current version of Lightroom and PS. In addition to those apps I’m running a bunch of productivity apps and Chrome. I’m monitoring my GTX 1080’s GPU memory usage via EVGA Precision.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            Blame Microsoft and Apple for trying to sell a “small/thin” form factor to the artsy crowd who don’t know jack about computer hardware.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]It is for 2D graphical editing/rendering not 3D graphical rendering/CAD/CAM. A lower-end Maxwell silicon with 4GiB of video memory is more than sufficient for the task. [/quote<] I don't know why people are ragging on the 980M. It's a GM204 chip, same as the GTX 980, albeit with fewer SMs enabled for power reasons. It may not be a full-fat 980, but I certainly wouldn't call it "lower-end".

          • End User
          • 3 years ago

          The 980M is a 2014 mobile GPU that is shipping in a 2016 flagship desktop. That alone is a slap in the face. The GTX 1xxx series GPUs have been shipping in laptops for months now. Its a real bummer that this thing does not ship with Nvidia’s current product.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            Nvidia is discarding its excessive stock of Maxwell-era silicon at lower rates then the current Pascal-tier crop.

            Microsoft is just scraping more pennies from its bottom line. Other OEMs have been doing this kind of stuff *cough* even Apple *cough*. Why are you so shocked?

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            I’m not even sure nVidia is just dumping old inventory. Systems like these have long development lead times and delays are common. Go back a couple of months and Pascal was just being announced, much less shipping in volume. I figure the system was delayed enough that it launched with a dated GPU but was too late in development to switch to what was on the horizon. MS wants this thing out for the shopping season.

            • Voldenuit
            • 3 years ago

            Yep. Also, the GTX 965M that ships in the base unit was tweaked in Jan 2016 to improve performance and power consumption. Since it’s supposedly based on the same GM204 core that powers the 980M, I wouldn’t be surprised if the 980M in the Studio is several revisions newer than the original 980M that came out late 2014.

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 3 years ago

    What a beautiful ad.

    Looks like a beautiful product too, though one I would have little use for. I look forward to seeing what that Surface Dial can do, and whether it provides any UX improvement over a touchscreen.

    • KDW
    • 3 years ago

    Gene Wilder is rolling. What a tediously boring version of that delightful song.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    This puts Wacom on notice more than Apple.

    That being said I think a fantastic setup would be to pair a new Surface Book/Pro with a Cintiq 27 QHD Touch. Desktop awesomeness plus mobility.

      • caconym
      • 3 years ago

      I wish it were more of a Cintiq-killer though. Like, if they put out a version without any of the computer guts and just let it be a huge pen display for, say $1500, that’d be something I’d look at buying.

      But the fact that there’s a (weak) computer inside means you’re going to be wanting a faster machine long before the screen itself wears out. 4.5k horizontal is a hell of a lot of pixels to try to handle with four modestly-clocked Skylake cores. It’s going to get a bit chuggy working with 1000-pixel brushes. And you’re not going to be giving one of these to a serious 3D artist with just a 980m.

      It feels like prosumer pricing for something that doesn’t quite have prosumer specs.

        • caconym
        • 3 years ago

        I should say, though, that the hinge mechanism looks *amazing*

        • the
        • 3 years ago

        I thought that the Cintiq units have DisplayPort [i<]input[/i<] so that you could use the monitor with a much beefier computer.

          • caconym
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, that’s what I was wishing the Surface could do, although maybe I worded it ambiguously. DisplayPort input by itself isn’t enough though. You also need an out-bound connection (USB) to send the pen data back to the host PC.

          The specs on the surface do list a mini-DP, although it doesn’t seem to say whether it’s an input, or an output for driving a second monitor.

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            The aux channel in DP can be used to send data back to the host system. Outside of touch support (which is appropriate given the context of this discussion) and tunneling USB, I haven’t heard of it used much. Cintiq units can output data to another host system via USB to function as a fully independent Wacom tablet so the DP aux channel is not necessary.

            Ultimately I’d like to have seen Thunderbolt 3 on this system: it can function as both an input and output with enough bandwidth for the display’s native resolution.

            Really eager to see if this feature pops up on version 2.0 of the Studio.

    • blastdoor
    • 3 years ago

    Not a product I’m interested in personally, and definitely a niche, but hats off to them for really trying something original and moving a product line forward!

    Seeing a strong effort like this from Microsoft reinforces that it’s very frustrating being a Mac guy these days. Fingers crossed that starts changing tomorrow (while my fingers are crossed, I’m not holding my breath).

      • salpert
      • 3 years ago

      I feel the same way. Apple is starting to feel like an old mule that won’t move from the spot its on. Apple will downplay the Surface products, but Microsoft really has something with their touchscreen computers and tablets.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 3 years ago

      Being a mac guy still means you get an iphone over one of the windows disasters.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 3 years ago

    “All models sport a color-calibrated 28″”

    And my seater car has an engine with horsepower.

    ‘colour-calibrated’ is a meaningless term without telling us what it’s calibrated to. Looking at the Microsoft page it looks like it’s Adobe RGB or DCI-P3 (or ‘Vivid colour’ which I guess is the native colour space that encompasses both).

    Notably there’s no sRGB profile which the majority of current content is designed for.

      • Airmantharp
      • 3 years ago

      I’d agree that I’d want to know beforehand too- not so much that it’d matter if I actually intended to use the system as designed (which I have no intention of, and thus no intention of buying), but if the panel itself were calibrated to to say ARGB with a built-in (updateable!) LUT, that’d certainly be an excellent selling point.

      And if it had multiple LUTs, say including the mentioned DCI-P3, SRGB, and maybe Rec.2020 for good measure, that’d be *awesome*.

      You know, for people who make use of such things.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Every monitor I’ve ever seen that has a factory calibrated AdobeRGB profile also has a factory calibrated sRGB profile.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      That’s a good spot, we’ve clarified that section.

        • Airmantharp
        • 3 years ago

        Thanks for that- though the clarification does add another point of criticism: what about Adobe RGB?

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like a great product for graphic artists. For that market, the price surprisingly is really good considering the cost of additional hardware for that niche. Hardware like the [url=http://www.wacom.com/en-us/products/wacom-mobilestudio-pro-16<]Wacom Mobile Studio Pro[/url<] would be the closest competitor. Considering the difference in screen size, portability, and GPUs, the price difference is where you'd expect it to be. Come December I think I'll take my wife, who is a professional graphic artist, out to a Microsoft Store to try one of these out. Everything that I'd change are minor or kinda niche in the niche professional market: A Quadro GPU option for those running truly professional applications. Thunderbolt 3 ports A DisplayPort 1.3 [i<]input[/i<] to drive that beautiful display from another system. Two front USB ports or USB ports on the display chassis SD card reader in the front (there is one in the rear) or on the display chassis. Ethernet. Seriously this is a desktop computer.

      • sweatshopking
      • 3 years ago

      they’re at MS stores tomorrow to check out.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Man, that actually looks really decent, especially the fancy hinge thing.

    The dial looks like a craptastic gimmick that will never sell on its own merit though.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    That’s SWEET! Wish I could afford one.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    In before the Apple fanboys who are obsessed with Canadian pricing: $3000 US –> $4011.6 CAD.

    BUT… this one has a Hockey Puck.

    MICROSOFT FOR THE WIN EH?

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 years ago

      Are you sure that isn’t a thermostat?

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        I imagine those are popular in Canadia too right?

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          Why would they need one of those? To switch between cold and cold?

      • pikaporeon
      • 3 years ago

      Then again Apple put out a hockey puck in 1998….

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        But they discontinued the puck and disrespected the sport where Canadia had only somewhat fewer [1] playoff teams than they had in baseball this year!

          • sweatshopking
          • 3 years ago

          hockey is only the farts. Young people prefer soccer in this country.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      But does it come with a complimentary unibrow?

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        I DO.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      One way or another, MSFT is always willing to puck you.

    • chµck
    • 3 years ago

    That dial seems like an under-emphasized feature.
    It adds a new dimension in desktop functionality.

      • drfish
      • 3 years ago

      Or [url=https://griffintechnology.com/us/powermate<]does it[/url<]?

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      All I could think of when I saw that was scratches.

      • SDLeary
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, something similar has been popular on the Macs off and on now for years;

      [url<]https://griffintechnology.com/us/device/laptops/powermate[/url<] Though I will admit that putting it on your screen and seeing results associated around its periphery is somewhat compelling. SDLeary

        • ImSpartacus
        • 3 years ago

        So is this comment signing thing really a thing now?

        Spartacus

          • uni-mitation
          • 3 years ago

          Dear ImSpartacus:

          Join the DAFT Party and “Make America sign again.”

          Sincerely,

          Uni-mitation

          • DrDominodog51
          • 3 years ago

          Yes. There are many benefits to signing your posts that have gone unnoticed for years. There is no reason to not sign your posts at this point.

          NoI’mSpartacus

      • caconym
      • 3 years ago

      Wacom has had a screen-perching remote control for their pen displays for a couple years now. And there are USB peripherals like the Contour Shuttle (basically a jog dial with some mappable buttons) if you don’t need something that sits on your display.

      MS controls the operating system though, so no doubt the integration for their peripheral will be tighter than what’s come before.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      Is it really that big of a deal?

      I feel like if it was, then we could just put a dial on our keyboards and be done with it.

      For touch devices, it wouldn’t be difficult to integrate a low profile dial into the bezel.

      I came just as many buckets as anyone else did during that video, but I’m still pretty skeptical of the unique utility of the magic dial.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    It has niche written all over it, but it’s definitely capable of doing things that are way beyond what an iMac will do.

    Ironically this is a “pro” product a lot more than the iPad Pro is.

      • sweatshopking
      • 3 years ago

      IF THAT WERE TRUE, THEN IT WOULD BE CALLED “PRO.” OBVIOUSLY THE IPAD IS MORE PRO.

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        Real Pros don’t need to be called Pro in the same way that consultant doctors at least in my country are called by their surname (Mr Gates) and not called doctor (Dr Cook) at all.
        So this is a Mr Microsoft product and not a Dr Apple or even a Dr Pepper computer.
        That’s also why LL Cool J was never really cool until he changed his name to Mr LL J at which point he was beyond cool and had an ice sheet in Alaska named after him.

          • oldog
          • 3 years ago

          It was my understanding (based on reports from physician colleagues who trained in the UK) that using a medical doctor’s surname only applied to surgeons and not “medical” physicians.

          The explanation (or so I was told in training) was that in jolly ol’ England surgeons were the descendants of “barbers” who used to used to perform surgery. This practice was curtailed by Henry the VIII by the way. There after surgeons who were medically trained as a way of distinguishing themselves from their colleagues used Mr. rather than Dr. in their names.

          “Cocking a snook” as it were.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 3 years ago

          This comment just kept getting weirder and weirder.

            • Duct Tape Dude
            • 3 years ago

            Odd indeed! But you have to admit, the insight isn’t wrong…

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      The iMac has a higher resolution display and it is 16:9 aspect ratio. Handy for the professional video editor who just captured some 5K or 6K content from a RED camera. The iMac’s IO capabilities are also superior.

      Though for many artists, the fact that the Surface Studio can double as a writing/touch surface makes it a superior product vs. an iMac.

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        “or the professional video editor who just captured some 5K or 6K content from a RED camera.”

        Would people with the funds to use a RED who are editing up to 6K video be content with the limited CPU/GPU in either of these devices? I figure a proper workstation would be the way to go.

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          If their software is OSX bound, ironically it could be more suitable than the GCN 1.0 Mac Pro…Le sigh. Wonder if that’ll get any love tomorrow, but I doubt it.

            • smilingcrow
            • 3 years ago

            At least the Mac Pro has a workstation CPU even if the GPUs actually show their age.
            But ultimately there is no Apple computer that is really suited as a serious editing machine.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 3 years ago

            A Xeon isn’t going to matter to the target audience.

            • smilingcrow
            • 3 years ago

            Not all the heavy lifting is done on the GPU surely?

            • tipoo
            • 3 years ago

            No, but a Xeon isn’t faster than an i7. It offers ECC memory, but that’s a bit overkill for video editing. Xeon isn’t instantly higher end than any Core series processor.

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            The Xeons in the Mac Pro [i<]should[/i<] have a clear edge but Apple's three year lag on new models (and that's [i<]assuming[/i<] we see an update tomorrow) mean that prosumer chips have caught up to the professional level. The Mac Pro tops out at 12 cores vs. 10 on the fastest Core i7 but the i7 should ultimately be faster due to more memory bandwidth, higher clock speeds and various architectural improvements. Apple has really, really dropped the ball when it comes to professional machines. They were laughed at with the cylinder redesign (and rightfully so) but now that Apple hasn't touched it since, it is just sad.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 3 years ago

            The inclusion of ECC is going to make all the difference???

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          There is the [url=http://www.red.com/products/red-rocket<]RED Rocket[/url<] for those who want additional editing acceleration. It is also one of the few devices that have been certified to work in an external PCIe Thunderbolt 1/2 chassis so that iMacs and the trash can Mac Pro can utilize them. My experience with RED in a production environment has been limited (did a shoot with a RED camera once last year and edited on an older MacPro wth a RED accelerator) but I strongly suspect that there is not RED codec support offered by any Intel/AMD/nVidia GPUs natively. OpenCL/Cuda acceleration is a possibility but something I don't know of off hand. If the Surface Studio had a Thunderbolt port or two, it'd tackle the video editing niche rather well for 4K footage. The screen is large enough to hold a preview window at native resolution with some editing windows/time line.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      I dunno that an iMac comparison is what Microsoft wants, though. The base 27″ iMac is $1800. While you can’t get a 1TB SSD in that model for some reason, you can upgrade it to 512GB of flash storage for $2300. Aside from the storage difference, the iMac “wins” in display resolutions/DPI, and “ties” with a quad-core Skylake CPU, an R9 M380 with 2GB of VRAM, and 8GB of memory. Are these touch-screen features and extra internal storage worth $700? That 380M is a Bonaire GPU with 768 ALUs, and should give the first-gen Maxwell GTX 965 a run for its money.

      For reference, the middle-of-the-pack iMac with a faster GPU can get 512GB of flash storage for $400 extra or 1TB for $900 extra, so a theoretical entry-level 27″ iMac with 1TB of storage would be $2800. For $200 maybe a touch-enabled screen could be interesting, but I don’t like poking at windows.

      • blastdoor
      • 3 years ago

      Speaking as someone who has long preferred owning desktops to laptops…. I almost feel like desktops in general are a “niche” product these days. But a niche that doesn’t really get a lot of love from anyone.

      So from that perspective, I appreciate Microsoft’s efforts here.

    • nico1982
    • 3 years ago

    What are the chances a more consumer oriented model is in the pipe? Surface Desk?

      • Horshu
      • 3 years ago

      PixelSense (aka, the original, original Surface).

    • Bomber
    • 3 years ago

    First thought, this is really slick. Looks good, lots of fuctionality. (I have a Surface Pro 2 and last years Surface Book). Second though, $3000? nevermind.

      • chµck
      • 3 years ago

      The display and storage eat up half the price right off the bat.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah this is clearly marketed at the “prosumer” market who actually have a reason to spend that much. Still sucks for everyone else.

      • superjawes
      • 3 years ago

      28″, >4k resolution, multi-touch input. I think that’s a pretty good deal for $3,000. Not something I would personally buy, but worth considering for someone who would use all of the “studio” functionality.

        • BoilerGamer
        • 3 years ago

        $3K and a 980M is a pretty good deal??? You must be in the business of overpaying for old silicon.

          • superjawes
          • 3 years ago

          Yes, because the 980M is the ONLY thing you’re getting for $3k /eyeroll

            • BoilerGamer
            • 3 years ago

            It is a large part of it and it is inexcusable to use outdated silicon on a premium flagship rpoduct.

            • superjawes
            • 3 years ago

            I’d say you’re wrong on both counts. First off, the main appeal is the screen, which is pretty large, has a good resolution, AND has multi-touch input. That basically makes it an oversized tablet for studio work. (Again, not something I would need or buy, but definitely something that has a market). On top of this, everything is housed in the same chassis, meaning that it takes up a lot less space than a desktop + monitor.

            Secondly, packaging is a big deal. Maybe the 1080M is available now, but there’s a good chance that MS started the chassis design with the 980M well before the 1080M was available. Even then, the 1080M might require a redesign to make sure that the machine doesn’t pull a Note 7. Also, the 1080M’s existence doesn’t make the 980M “bad”. It’s still a solid performer, and perfectly reasonable when paired with other hardware (the screen that the target market is after).

          • ImSpartacus
          • 3 years ago

          If you buy an aio because it has a pretty spec sheet, then you’re doing it wrong.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t forget, the $2999 price is for the i5 w/GTX 965M and 2GB of video ram to drive the 4.5k display…hope no one is going to try to game on this.

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        It’s clearly not aimed at gaming but there’s no stopping the uninformed from doing something silly.

      • Billstevens
      • 3 years ago

      Pretty much every gamer agrees with you on that price making something like this a no go. But if you are competing with Apple in the premium PC market, pandering to upper income people spending $50k on new cars then $3k for a really nice looking computer is right up their ally.

      • Billstevens
      • 3 years ago

      Oh an of course buying this as a write off for graphic artists.

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