Apple’s latest MacBook Pros ditch the F keys

Hot on the heels of Microsoft's hardware event yesterday, Apple took the wraps off a new lineup of MacBook Pro hardware this afternoon. The company has trimmed off the usual millimeters, shaved some pounds, and trimmed some legacy ports from its these machines, but we've come to expect as much from new Macs. The headline feature of these notebooks is a multifunction touch strip that Apple calls Touch Bar. This display can adapt to the needs of the in-focus application and give users quick access to commonly-used tools and settings. The Touch Bar also incorporates a Touch ID sensor-cum-power-button that brings Apple Pay and improved security to the machines.

Apple demonstrated the Touch Bar with Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, a DJ app, and Microsoft Office, among others. The Touch Bar works in tandem with a huge multi-touch trackpad featuring Apple's Taptic Engine haptic feedback system to allow users a wide range of input options.

The new MacBook Pros come in the same 13" and 15" form factors as before, but Apple incorporated some of the tricks it learned from designing the MacBook into its latest machines. The LCD panel in both notebooks is now thinner than ever, and it's brighter, contrastier, and more colorful than the last generation of MacBook Pros. Apple didn't say what color gamuts the new panel supports, but we're betting it's the usual DCI P3 standard that Apple uses when it talks "wide-gamut." Another MacBook carry-over is a refined version of the slim, short-travel keyboard in that wafer-thin machine.

We predicted Kaby Lake wouldn't be coming to any MacBook Pro refresh because of the projected first-quarter 2017 release of higher-TDP seventh-gen Core chips, and Apple bore that guess out with a round of Skylake CPU upgrades for its top-end notebooks. The 13" MacBook Pro gets an unspecified dual-core Core i5 CPU with 2.9 GHz base and 3.3 GHz Turbo speeds. That chip comes with Intel's Iris Graphics 550 IGP. Two faster CPU options are available for speed demons.

The 15" model gets a range of Skylake quad-core parts starting with 2.6 GHz base and 3.5GHz Turbo speeds. 13" machines get 8GB of DDR4-2133 RAM to start with, and 16GB is available as an upgrade. 15" machines are stuck with 16GB no matter what, though—somewhat concerning for a pro-grade machine. Solid-state storage options range from 256GB up to 1TB in 13" machines, and from 256GB to 2TB in the 15" systems.

AMD scored a major design win with the latest MacBook Pros. The 15" model comes with the Radeon Pro 450 chip paired with 2GB of memory. No specs for this part are online yet, but it seems to be a Polaris chip at the very least. A Radeon Pro 455 powers the higher-end base configuration of the 15" model, and a Radeon Pro 460 chip with 4GB of RAM is available as an upgrade option for all 15" machines.

Apple ditched the range of single-purpose ports ringing the MacBook Pros of the past for four Thunderbolt 3 ports . Each of these ports can move up to 40 Gbps in Thunderbolt 3 mode, and they also support a wide range of display and data connections like USB 3.1 and DisplayPort 1.2. Owners can plug a charger into any one of those ports as needed, as well, although that move heralds the end of the life-saving MagSafe quick-disconnect power plug.

Those hoping for a MacBook Air upgrade announcement can likely write a eulogy for that machine. For those customers, Apple has a stripped-down version of the new MacBook Pro 13" with a 2 GHz Core i5 CPU that can Turbo up to 3.1 GHz, 8GB of memory (upgradable to 16GB), solid-state storage options ranging from 256GB to 1TB, and a fixed row of standard function keys. This machine will go for $1499 and up. Prices for the Touch Bar-equipped MacBook Pros start at $1799 for the 13" model and $2499 for the 15" machine. A wide range of upgrade options can take those prices up by a thousand bucks or more. The machines are all available for pre-order on Apple's site now, and the company says shipments will begin in two to three weeks.

Comments closed
    • coolflame57
    • 3 years ago

    APPLE! BACK AT IT AGAIN WITH THE TRADING OF FUNCTIONALITY FOR SIMPLICITY/AESTHETICS!

    • wingless
    • 3 years ago

    Apple should allow “clones”. We should be able to buy and load the OS on Intel UEFI PCs we can build at home or buy at the store. They can have their Premium line of in-house engineered computers, like Microsoft is doing with the Surface line, but OSX should be open to the masses.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Do you know that was a thing up until 1998? When Jobs was brought back and he was turning Apple around, he canned the program to ensure they had more higher margin sales.

      [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_clone#Jobs_ends_the_official_program[/url<]

    • Laykun
    • 3 years ago

    EVERY time they demoed something on the OLED touch input I wondered why it wasn’t on screen and using gestures on that lovely big touch pad.

    “Oh yes you can scroll through your photos on this tiny little OLED and see mini previews”

    “Right, or I could use this awesome huge touchpad and scroll the photos on my main screen and have nice big previews, hmmm”

    My MSI GS60 from 2 years ago has a better GPU in it than these radeon pros. And you know what, it’s only 4.2lbs and 0.78″ (19.9mm) in thickness. Not to mention CHEAPER.

    • heinsj24
    • 3 years ago

    I haven’t touched any my Apple computers in the last month or so. Hell, my mini, which I would use for the tv tuner hasn’t been used in 6 months. I seem to be using just iOS devices and Windows 10.

    I was kind of hoping to see something in this announce to jumpstart me into buying an updated Mac. Like others have said… time to purchase more dongles. I’ve purchased a ton of dongles for my Apple devices. The only one missing is the 4pin to 5pin MagSafe connector – if I don’t recycle the 2008 MBP.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    Honestly, I’d rather keep my XPS 13 than “switch” for free, even though these MBPs are twice the price and feature a stronger Intel GPU. The hassle of dongles just isn’t worth it.

    • Huhuh
    • 3 years ago

    IMO, not enough people are talking about the bigger touchpad. Thats the only thing that my current laptop envy to the MBP. The rest is fluff.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      It…Confuses me. The Macbook Pro before this had a trackpad that ended just where your hands start where you’re typing, and the surface was large enough to do 5 finger gestures. Now part of it will sit under your palms. What’s the need for it to be bigger? We’re not doing 10 finger gestures, and they didn’t say it supports Pencil.

        • Huhuh
        • 3 years ago

        I’m just comparing it to my current laptop(Dell Latitude 7470) where the touchpad is tiny. It happens quite often that I tell to myself that a bigger touchpad would be useful for long drag and drops. The way I see it would improve accuracy at the expense of making longer movement so it would make it easier to draw, underline in onenote etc. Not supporting a stylus on the MPB is clearly a missed opportunity.

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          Ohh, I misread, I thought you meant coming from a recent rMBP.

      • flip-mode
      • 3 years ago

      Start talking. Let me hear about it. Like… it’s really big. Looks too big, potentially. It’s not a touchpad, it’s more like a touch table.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 3 years ago

        [url=https://www.amazon.com/D-Force-Deluxe-Dance-Pump-USB/dp/B01JLF43B6/<]DDR for Mac[/url<]?

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    And you’re going to need another dongle in order to connect your iPhone.

    • BIF
    • 3 years ago

    I am impressed by the touch bar and TB ports, but unimpressed by the lack of actual infrastructure improvement under the hood.

    Literally, even the top-most MBP offering is nothing more than an anemic attempt. A maximum screen size of only 15 inches? Only 16 GB of RAM? An SSD with a maximum capacity of 512 GB? Radeon GPU with only 2GB RAM?

    It’s a laptop COMPUTER, not a tablet. Where’s the beef, Apple?

    The new MBP would be good for office-type applications and non-3D graphic work, but then so would any i5 machine from Dell or HP. Or the Mackbook Air, for that matter. I don’t know why Apple even bothered here. Without a real “top tier” MBP in this announcement, I guess I don’t understand why Apple even bothers with a Macbook “Pro” line.

    Apple had a really good opportunity to rock the industry and breathe life back into the laptop space. They didn’t just pass up an opportunity; I think they didn’t even SEE the opportunities.

    Even if a 17″ screen is never going to be an option offered by Apple again, this machine should have been offered with build options of up to 32GB (or better yet, 64) RAM, at least up to 2TB of internal SSD capacity with an available space for the customer to add at least one consumer-SSD device, and the ability for the 3D consumer needing CUDA to choose an Nvidia GPU with up to 6GB of GPU RAM.

    So many opportunities lost. At least Asus, Dell, Saeger, Eurocom, et. al. are building great 17″ laptops.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      The 460 BTO is 4GB, which I’m glad for.
      But yeah, at those prices, I wish Apple had just made 4GB vRAM the baseline.

        • BIF
        • 3 years ago

        Thank you.

        But 6GB is becoming the standard needed for rendering complex 3D scenes. That’s my line in the sand.

        And I feel justified in that because laptops no longer need to be thought of as merely a lightweight/portable computing platform. They’re COMPUTERS; let’s make them go! We have tablets and phones for the “lightweight” space. Several manufacturers are already making laptops into REAL computers, so why not Apple? Why is Apple being so myopic?

        As I said, I like the touch bar. The name sounds like an interesting after-hours place. ;P It’s even cool for computers. But with all the other “meh” here, I just think this line of laptops deserves better from Apple.

          • blastdoor
          • 3 years ago

          I agree with all of that….

          I wish Apple were interested in meeting the computer needs of people who really need high-end, powerful computers, but it’s becoming harder to deny that they just aren’t interested in pursuing that market.

          I just think it’s such a bad decision. The really high end might be small, but those folks tend to have money, and they tend to be more influential in affecting other people’s decisions. Also, it’s good marketing to have a “halo” product — something really awesome that most people will never buy, but that makes most people feel better (however irrational that might be) about buying the more mainstream products. Also, what’s today’s high end can become tomorrow’s mainstream.

          Anyway… I guess I’ll wait to see what comes of the Mac Pro. Once my last lingering hopes are fully crushed, I can then get on with the rest of my life 😉

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          Also frustrating that the top Surface book, which appears to have a better GPU than these Macbook pros, only tops out at 2GB – after doubling from last gen. Even the Surface Studio tops out at 4GB.

          Microsoft is bringing the sexy, but skimping on VRAM isn’t where I wanted them to follow Apple…

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            Microsoft has an unfortunate tendency to copy all the bad bits of the Apple model.

      • smilingcrow
      • 3 years ago

      You can spec the 15″ with a 2TB SSD.

        • BIF
        • 3 years ago

        Well, that’s a start!

        Now can I get one with an empty SATA-type bay and a 6 GB Nvidia GPU and maybe a bit more RAM than 16 GB?

        Notice I didn’t ask for an internal DVD drive. I’m willing to come part of the way! 😀

          • beck2448
          • 3 years ago

          Underpowered and over priced.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    This has been tried before several times, OLED keyboards, touchscreen numpads and it has always failed for the same reason; nobody likes pressing keys without feedback.

    All I can see really happening as a result of this is that Apple won’t sell anywhere near as many Macbook Pros to Bootcamp fans this time around. Windows without all the right keys is a bad enough experience already. Take out the F-Keys and it’s just salt in the wound.

    As always the die-hard apple fans will lap this up, claim it’s the best thing ever, and tout that Apple were the first to do this and innovative whilst conveniently forgetting all the non-Apple devices that have done something similar to date. :rolleyes:

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Did they mention taptic engine being in there for feedback? I don’t recall it

      • blastdoor
      • 3 years ago

      Apparently bootcamp users will see the traditional F keys when running Windows:

      [url<]http://www.macrumors.com/2016/10/28/using-touch-bar-with-boot-camp-windows/[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Useful.

        Still not tactile though, and presumably requires drivers. Also, what version of Windows will Apple support? Likely only 10 🙁

        What about Linux distros?

        At least they’re still selling the standard key version too.

          • windwalker
          • 3 years ago

          Who buys Macs to run Linux on them?
          It makes no sense.

    • hasseb64
    • 3 years ago

    They ditched that stupid Mag-safe connector, one step forward but 3 steps back by ditching F-keys, increased price and no Kaby Lake.

    Even brighter LCD?? I have mine on max 30%, what a joke!

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      Magsafe is awesome, not sure what your issues are with it…

      And yes, a brighter, wider-gamut screen is terrible. Sorry Apple doesn’t make their products to please only you, Hasseb.

        • hasseb64
        • 3 years ago

        Never ever have I even been close to fall over this cord but 10000 have the connector lost connection…

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Well, more importantly it comes with a higher contrast ratio. My 15″ rMBP is mostly great, but blacks are never truly black, like most LCDs. Hopefully this comes closer.

    • NeelyCam
    • 3 years ago

    RIP Macbook Air. No more sub-$1000 laptops.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      There are some wicked Air refurb deals though. If you want one, get ’em while they last!

    • Unknown-Error
    • 3 years ago

    And replaced with F-U keys?

    • Raymond Page
    • 3 years ago

    There needs to be commentary on the touch bar usability. Watching Apple showcase it was painful. The entire time it made me realize how Microsoft struck gold with the Surface design. Every user was removing focus from the main screen to get functional context and treating the tiny touch bar as a full input device. Every input experience made you want to yell, put the contextual control on the screen and make the screen touch enabled.

    Apple has #courage to cease innovation and rest on their laurels.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      Surely the touch panel on HP laptops (fixed function “keys”) was PITA. I can see the use case for Apple’s solution but I expect that it may be unsupported by bunch of existing apps (and force users to – otherwise – unnecessary upgrades). Not my money so I don’t care.

        • Klimax
        • 3 years ago

        I had Elitebook with them. Worked quite well.

      • caconym
      • 3 years ago

      “You don’t need a touchscreen, you need 1/20th of a touchscreen” – Apple

      (I’m surprised I don’t see any references to the 1st-generation B & N Nook. That’s what the touch bar immediately made me think of.)

    • yuhong
    • 3 years ago

    It is LPDDR3, not DDR4. Yes, they left that out of the keynote. I wonder when Intel is going to support LPDDR4

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      Wow, I was almost certain it was DDR4. I didn’t know LPDDR4 doesn’t yet exist.

      Thanks for the info.

    • synthtel2
    • 3 years ago

    Yo dawg, we heard you like modal interfaces, so we put a modal interface on the controls for your modal interface.

    /vim users

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      If there’s a vim mode then Chuckula is going to be a new Apple fanboy!

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    So, apparently none of them include a charging cable, just the brick…It’s hard to make enough of a margin on a $4199 15″ rmBP to add in a 19 cent to manufacture cable, I know.

    Cable costs 20 bucks…Which, if you’re buying a new Mac, isn’t much extra, but come on with the nickel and diming.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 3 years ago

      It takes #Courage to nickel and dime.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      The buy page shows a two-meter cable “in the box”

      [url<]http://www.apple.com/us-hed/shop/buy-mac/macbook-pro?product=MLL42LL/A&step=config#[/url<]

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      wrong.

    • sweatshopking
    • 3 years ago

    AT LEAST THEY DIDN’T WASTE THOUSANDS OF ENGINEER HOURS ON USELESS 3D PAINT.

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      The 3D Paint demos were cool. A little gimmicky, but really nice looking.

      I would *love* to see something like it in Photoshop that let me quickly visualize complex stacked layers and masks.

        • Klimax
        • 3 years ago

        I thought that was sarcasm…

          • sweatshopking
          • 3 years ago

          it was. Apple’s event was incredibly less innovative and interesting than Microsoft’s was. The stuff MS is doing is far more future looking and cool.
          MS – VR HEADSETS, NEW METHODS OF INTERACTING, 3D PRINT MINECRAFT, 3D SCAN TO HOLOGRAM OR 3D PRINTING OR ART, NEW SURFACE, NEW DIAL, ETC.
          APPLE – WE TOOK SOME KEYS AWAY AND RAISED PRICES SIGNIFICANTLY. YOU’RE WELCOME.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            While you’re right, I’m not terribly excited by either.

            • adisor19
            • 3 years ago

            I don’t know what’s going on but this is the second time in recent memory that I upvote you.. *sigh* times are changing I guess for the worst.

            Adi

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            WE’RE BASICALLY IN LOVE NOW.

            • curtisb
            • 3 years ago

            I just LOL’ed. You crack me up.

          • Laykun
          • 3 years ago

          It’s always sarcasm.

            • BIF
            • 3 years ago

            Holy carp, I actually got his sarcasm this time. The next thing I know, I’ll be upvoting his allcaps posts. And then dogs will lie down with cats, whatever THAT means.

            😉

    • Shouefref
    • 3 years ago

    Apple is not a computer firm. It’s a toy factory. But it uses the image of a computer firm. It once was. Long ago. When I wasn’t born yet.

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    I need my F key and three other letters to describe my feelings about the lack of Mac desktop updates.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      I’d need those same keys to describe my reaction to the whacking huge touchpad.

      • hasseb64
      • 3 years ago

      Haha, comment of the Month!

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Wait? You are Fine with the lack of Mac desktop updates?!?!?

      • kerwin
      • 3 years ago

      F-L-A-N. It would definitely take my mind off the lack of updates.

    • WhatMeWorry
    • 3 years ago

    At first, I read the title as Apple’s MacBook Pro ditches the F key.

    Then I thought: Oh uck.

    • Fieryphoenix
    • 3 years ago

    Umm… yeah. No.

    I don’t see a shortage of space to have them in there.

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 3 years ago

    Count me underwhelmed. I appreciate the more modern hardware and move to USB-C in a big way, but the price jumps are outrageous. I’m willing to pay a premium for access to the ecosystem, lifetime (or close to it) free OS upgrades, and features like Filevault 2, but only so much. I don’t think these prices will be well received at all.

      • Billstevens
      • 3 years ago

      Maybe, but your average Apple buyer isn’t dwelling on price. They are willing to pay too much for new Apple products because, premium marketing rocks….

    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    So, no type A USB, no HDMI. Only TB.

    I carry all the time a TB->DVI, TB->LAN and TB->VGA for my rMBP, but at least I can use USB keys and HDs. To replicate what I actually do today (2 screens + LAN + eventually an external HD) I will need a TB to HDMI plus a TB to USB (if I don’t buy a TB HD which would be incompatible with all other devices), in addition to the TB->LAN and TB->DVI.

    A total of 4 adapters (or 1-2 $120 multiadapters?). Nice.

    Otherwise, the CPU upgrade is good, the RAM is faster and iGPU is certainly much better. SSD has always been stellar.

    I guess I’ll keep my current rMBP a very long time.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      You’re better off getting a single Type C to Type A adapter and a USB 3.0 hub.

        • cygnus1
        • 3 years ago

        Even better, a hub with type C upstream connection, multiple type A ports, and a video out of your choice.

        Similar to this:
        [url<]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B019R9ILTG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_wfSeybDQ9AF7K[/url<] Been using that with a 2016 MacBook. Pretty solid.

          • ptsant
          • 3 years ago

          Well, that actually looks like a decent solution, even better than what I have now. If it had Ethernet it would have been perfect!

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            You could plug this into it and be done: [url<]http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MC704LL/A/apple-usb-ethernet-adapter[/url<] It won't get you Gigabit speeds, since it's USB 2.0, but if you're just looking for something that can keep up with an Airport Time Capsule (mine seems to max out around 200mbps for transfers to that thing), it'll do.

            • ptsant
            • 3 years ago

            Thanks for the suggestion, but I also noticed a Belkin Gbit TB adapter at $40 that would probably be more efficient.

            Then I also need the multiport adapter ($80) for HDMI. I may not need the TB 2->TB 3 ($55) adapter.

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            For the Macbook the other key thing, since it only has the one USB port, was that it had Type-C power input and supported power delivery so that the Macbook could be charged while it was connected. There are similar hubs out there that also have ethernet, but often no display output or a lot more expensive because it’s really a full docking solution at that point. I intentionally opted for a separate type-a USB ethernet device that came bundled with a type-c adapter. That way I can use it by itself or with the hub depending on the situation.

            [url<]https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00WHL9ENY/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/url<] I carry both in the laptop bag but honestly it's pretty rare I use the ethernet adapter. The few times I've used it was when I was configuring a router from the Macbook and wifi wasn't setup yet. edit: english blah

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          Dang, that looks super cool.

      • xeridea
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah they would rather make a useless laptop and sell you a handful of annoying adapters than make a real computer with real ports. All this so they can save 0.000001mm, and use the stupid tb ports which no one else in the world cares about except them. What is the point of a thin laptop if you have to carry around tons of ghetto adapters?

      And having ghetto touch button things instead of f-keys is not “pro”. F-keys save tons of time while doing actual work on computers, the macs have been kinda ghetto in this reguard anyway though,.

      • End User
      • 3 years ago

      I have a 2014 15″ MBP. 802.11ac has replaced ethernet. AirDrop, NAS, and the cloud have replaced USB sticks and external drives. AirPlay has replaced projector cables. I use the display of my MBP at its native resolution + mission control – both make external displays unnecessary.

      Even if you do need adapters they are chump change compared to the cost of a new MBP.

        • ptsant
        • 3 years ago

        I work at a bioinformatics facility. For several reasons, I have to use wired network (security, transfer speed). USB HDs are a must for exchanging data with linux workstations and other users. Most monitors are HDMI or DVI, so I plug my laptop with the adapters. I really don’t think AirPlay is an option with our projectors, so I carry an (oldskool) VGA adapter.

        I dont’ mind the cost, but having an ultra slim laptop only to carry a whole bag of adapters around kinda defeats the purpose of the slim laptop.

        I could build an “all-apple” environment at home, but the fact is that the device has to be interoperable with professional environments which are out of my control.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    $1800 for a 13″ and $2500 for a base 15″ MBP!?!? How do they expect anyone to afford these?

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      Behold the Apple tax, and yet there’s probably plenty of people pre-ordering these machines right now.

      Plus, life is good when one of your biggest competitors products are literally going up in flames.

        • Ninjitsu
        • 3 years ago

        But samsung doesn’t make laptops anymore, does it? (and the phones were burning)

        Apple doesn’t have a competitor in the sense that no one else makes anything with MacOS or iOS. If they sold their software like MS/Google then I think the Mac/iOS/PC/Android equations would have been very similar.

          • DancinJack
          • 3 years ago

          Samsung does make laptops, still.

        • TEAMSWITCHER
        • 3 years ago

        Microsoft just released an iMac with a slow-ass hybrid drive and laptop processor that starts at $3000 and you think the Apple Tax is bad? LOL!

      • halfline
      • 3 years ago

      With courage.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    4 Thunderbolt 3 ports. About fucking time.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      You will start seeing more USB-C ports coming out on higher-end customer-tier motherboards once Kaby Lake comes around.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]http://creators.radeon.com/radeon-pro/[/url<] Click "Radeon Pro" on the right side of the page and get lots of detail: Radeon Pro 460 1.86 TFLOPS PEAK PERFORMANCE (UP TO) 16 (1024) COMPUTE UNITS (STREAM PROCESSORS) 80 GB/S MEMORY BANDWIDTH Radeon Pro 455 1.3 TFLOPS PEAK PERFORMANCE (UP TO) 12 (768) COMPUTE UNITS (STREAM PROCESSORS) 80 GB/S MEMORY BANDWIDTH Radeon Pro 450 1 TFLOPS PEAK PERFORMANCE (UP TO) 10 (640) COMPUTE UNITS (STREAM PROCESSORS) 80 GB/S MEMORY BANDWIDTH Someone else could probably calculate max boost clocks from that. 80GB/sec is 128-bit 5GT/s GDDR5, I'm sure.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      I like the picture of the hitchhiker on that page.

      Incidentally, the Radeon Pro 450 is so cut down that the 45 watt Iris Pro could give it a run for its money in at least some tasks. Apple’s software system appears to be tuned to GCN though, so that’s a save for AMD.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Dammit, now I’m going to have to spend a little time trying to figure out the max clocks.

        The 896-equipped RX 460 has a stock max boost of 1.2GHz and maxes out at 2.2TFLOPS. Since that’s 7/8 of the max stream processors, a theoretical “465” with 1024 SPs gets up to 2.514 TFLOPS at the same 1.2GHz.

        So if the Pro 460 only gets 1.86, that’s 74% of 2.514, working out to a max boost of 888MHz.

        The Radeon Pro 450 has only 53.7% of the throughput while carrying 5/8 (62.5%) of the stream processors. I think that works out to a max boost of 763MHz.

        At this point I just realized I don’t need max clocks to figure out if you’re right. But, um…now we have a good guess at max boost clocks, eh?

        So let’s finish it out. The Radeon Pro 455 has 69.89% of the throughput and 75% of the SPs. Assuming that 888 was right, I’m figuring a max boost for the 455 of 827MHz.

        (FWIW you’re probably right, but since the screen is so high-resolution I’m sure that having a separate pool of memory with its own bandwidth has to help all by itself, right? I honestly don’t know. I’m quite positive it can only run dual 5K displays because of the GPU, though. The 13″ models can only run one)

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      455 = XBO
      460 = PS4

      450 = something not those

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Roughly, but both of those systems have more aggregate memory bandwidth. The PS4 has 256-bit path to GDDR5, and it runs at a higher frequency for more than twice as much total. The Bone has 256-bit DDR3, but also can use that 32MB embedded cache for developer-specified tasks.

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          True, but Polaris memory compression seems to reduce memory pressure a good 40% (very roughly), and the consoles are sharing a CPU and GPU load to the same memory (subtract maybe 20GB/s, and using them together also reduces total bandwidth* ). I think in total, these new chips would come very close.

          [url<]http://images.eurogamer.net/2013/articles//a/1/7/8/9/7/3/8/PS4_GPU_Bandwidth_140_not_176.png/EG11/resize/600x-1/quality/80/format/jpg[/url<]

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      I guess you can even game on the 460 at half retina resolution. Looks quite powerful.

      Don’t remember what kind of apps use OpenCL in Macs, I think some of the photo/video editing software. Could be a nice boost there, too.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Pretty much all of Apple’s Final Cut/Motion/whatever video apps, along with Adobe’s and pretty much everyone else’s just to stay competitive.

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<] I guess you can even game on the 460 at half retina resolution [/quote<] Yeah, I hear the game on OSX isn't too bad!

          • ptsant
          • 3 years ago

          I have a proper desktop with enough LED-endowed components to serve as a christmas tree. It is quite nice for gaming, so I never looked at OS X gaming.

          I had to check now, since you commented.

          Out of my approx 700 steam game collection, exactly 156 are natively available on OS X. I didn’t check GOG, would probably have another 400-500 games there , since most are running on top of emulators.

          Now, I can’t say which of the 156 games are actually playable on my rMBP. I don’t really care. But I guess that the 460 pro can probably handle many of them.

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            You’re assuming that the drivers function as well as windows. you’d be wrong.

        • tipoo
        • 3 years ago

        Indeed, 1440×900 is a sweet spot for the 15″ retina gaming, as it’s a perfect integer scale of 2880×1800, so things still look fairly sharp, while the midrange GPUs also do ok there. The 460 should be quite nice at that res, considering it has PS4-like execution power at a lower resolution.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    So Apple didn’t “F” you? First time in years that has happened.

      • Shobai
      • 3 years ago

      You saw the prices, right?

        • Neutronbeam
        • 3 years ago

        Good one!

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    As a Mac mini user (home workstation and HTPC) I am hoping that there will be a quiet Mac mini update sometime soon. I fear that won’t happen though.

    Realistically I should probably fully replace the Mac mini HTPC with my current gen Apple TV (thanks to Plex on the Apple TV) and switch my workstation over to a new 15″ MBP attached to something like the LG UltraFine 5K.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      For HTPC I’d honestly just hackintosh a Mini-sized box at this point. Looks great, is small, performs, well, like Skylake.

      [url<]http://snazzylabs.com/article/skylake-mac-mini-hackintosh/[/url<]

        • End User
        • 3 years ago

        Apple TV has Plex, Netflix, iTunes, AirPlay, etc so the HTPC has basically reached the end of the line for me.

          • adisor19
          • 3 years ago

          It doesn’t have Kodi.

          HTPC = Kodi.

          Adi

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        why would you want to bother with osx for a htpc?

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          Maybe one has a preferred OS? OP wanted an updated Mini for it so that’s a possible alternative.

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            sure. but why? why waste all that time and energy making an illegal copy of osx? what’s the point? what do you gain in the HTPC space?

            • adisor19
            • 3 years ago

            I much rather macOS than Windwos 8 – 10 at least for the time being.

            Adi

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            I’m sure you’d much rather. WHY RUN AN ILLEGAL VERSION OF OSX ON A HTPC. WHAT ADVANTAGE DOES IT BRING THAT JUSTIFIES BREAKING THE LAW? Personal preference? that’s pretty damn small. Run Linux and avoid the criminality.

          • Ninjitsu
          • 3 years ago

          cause win 10 doesn’t come with WMC

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            Last time I checked neither did osx

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            Never said it did! 😛

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            then your point isn’t relevant.

          • adisor19
          • 3 years ago

          The mini’s are pretty solid as an HTPC. macOS is stable and Kodi runs great on them. Even better, they look pretty decent in the living room and the small little remote control works wonders.

          They’re also damn silent. Also free macOS update for years and years are nice too.

          Getting a used Mini from ebay is a good deal for an HTPC. Buying new right now is a rippoff.

          Adi

        • adisor19
        • 3 years ago

        I’d go the hackintosh route as well if there is one model known to be more or less 99% compatible with stock macOS.

        The innards of the current mini are a joke.

        The last Mini with a discrete graphics card came out in 2011. It’s beyond sad.

        Adi

      • NTMBK
      • 3 years ago

      Have you considered an NVidia Shield? It can run Plex server.

    • Ryhadar
    • 3 years ago

    I was waiting until today to see if the new rMBP were vastly superior to the current gen. I really want to jump into iOS development so today I’ll be ordering a new 201[b<]5[/b<] 13" rMBP. Thanks for the wallets savings from your completely underwhelming product launch, Apple!

    • blastdoor
    • 3 years ago

    Many of the technologies here (TouchID, touch-screen OLED strip, Skylake) could have been incorporated into a MacBook Pro long ago. For example, TouchID first came out in the iPhone 5s back in 2013.

    The rest of the lineup — especially the Mac Pro and Mac Mini — continues to languish.

    Something is clearly wrong at Apple. Purely from the perspective of maximizing profits, this kind of stagnation makes no sense to me.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      What, you don’t want years-old CPUs and GPUs in your brand new aluminum status symbol?

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      I think they’re doing pretty well at maximizing profits. If I had to guess, the profit margin for the MBPs is well over 300% from a hardware perspective.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        I’m pretty sure the most strenuous thing that a good chunk of Mac buyers do these days is run the iOS simulator and build .ipa packages, since these things are basically just enormous iOS development hardware dongles.

          • Redocbew
          • 3 years ago

          That would be the only real reason I’d get one. Since the MacOS is such a pain in the neck to virtualize there’s not much of a choice if you’re going to be spending any significant amount of time developing for iOS.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            There’s no graphics acceleration for virtualized OS X anyway. It’d be a nightmare to try to develop for iOS in a VM. I’d rather Hackintosh it, but thanks to the fact that Apple has so much old hardware, even that is boring.

        • blastdoor
        • 3 years ago

        Just read their latest earnings statement — they are not doing pretty well at maximizing profits. Their revenue, marketshare, and profits are all down while their R&D expenditures are up.

        I’m not opposed to R&D, but it ought to be translating into higher profits, not lower profits.

        My guess is that Titan has been an expensive boondoggle that has distracted management and other key players, thereby getting in the way of advancing existing products.

        Even if Titan is a great idea and working out flawlessly, Apple ought to be able to advance existing products at the same time. Compared to their massive resources, their product development pace is kind of sad.

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          R&D rarely leads to profits in the same quarter. Annually has a chance but even then, it is mostly groundwork for stuff coming a year or two down the line.

          Then again, one has to ask how much lost sales Apple has had by not updating several Mac lineups after a couple of years.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            Their R&D two years ago was plenty big,

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            So I guess in two more years, Apple will finally release updates to their desktop line?

            Spoiler: it is shaped like a sphere, there are no physical ports and power is provided wirelessly by a Van de Graaff generator.

          • Ninjitsu
          • 3 years ago

          Titan?

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            [url<]http://www.pcmag.com/commentary/348158/apples-project-titan-is-not-about-building-a-car[/url<] edit sad that I'm down voted for trying to answer a question. sad, but certainly not unexpected. Way to keep it classy, folks.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            Thanks!

            (And you’ve been here long enough to ignore random unexplained down-votes, man. people gonna people.)

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      This is just how Apple works.

      Remember when the single socket mac pro came out? Apple hadn’t updated the dual socket Mac pro in so long that the new one had more cores and better performance despite having only one cpu.

      Apple tends to wait so they can have larger releases that are more likely to wow their audience.

      We make fun of them, but they know what works for them.

        • the
        • 3 years ago

        Umm… no. The performance gains of the IvyBridge-EP based Mac Pro only pulled ahead of the previous dual Westmere Mac Pro when AVX code used. Certainly there were plenty of IPC gains when moving from Westmere to Ivy Bridge but the catch here that for the Mac Pros, Westmere was clocked higher, negating that advantage. In fact, a few things were clearly a step [i<]backward[/i<]: the tower Mac Pros supported up to 128 GB of memory vs. 64 GB in the cylinder design. Raw memory bandwidth is ever so slightly higher on previous dual socket tower too. The other advancements of the new Mac Pro, PCIe based storage and dual video cards, could be added to the previous generation tower systems. This has kept older systems surprisingly competitive as long as users kept upgrading them. Oh, and it would have been cheaper too as Apple increased prices on the new design. Speaking of upgrades, Apple has passed over a lot of possibilities on the Mac Pro for no real good reason. Haswell-EP and Broadwell-EP have arrived which has brought better IPC, higher clock speed and more cores. On the video card front, AMD has released Hawaii, Tonga, Fiji and now Polaris. nVidia has been releasing new hardware too but Apple doesn't even offer such options. PCIe based storage has gotten faster and Apple even makes their own controllers now. However, the cylinder models are using a first generation PCIe based storage device that has been eclipsed. There was no wow as performance moved laterally, frustration at the lack of upgrade options, and despair since it has been nearly three years for [i<]any[/i<] updates of that product line.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 3 years ago

          I get what you’re saying, but none of that matters because that’s just not how Apple works.

          No one has to like it or appreciate it, but we can at least acknowledge how they think when they are launching products.

          Also, I’m not sure where you’re coming from when you said dual westmere is better than single socket Ivy Bridge in non-avx workloads. Apple very intentionally waited until they could put a 12 core 2.7 GHz E5 2697 v2 into their fancy trash can so it could at least match a dual 6 core 3.06 GHz X5675. You can’t argue that Ivy Bridge doesn’t have the ipc to make up that modest clock difference over classic Westmere and core counts are very clearly equal.

          Again, I feel the need to restate this because this community really struggles with empathy: No one is saying that the unibody Mac Pro is a good value or even a good purchase and no one is suggesting that the 1st gen Mac Pro couldn’t’ve easily been updated through the years. None of is need to be reminded of those things. But we can have the emotional maturity to recognize that Apple thinks in a slightly unique way. This is important because having the empathy to recognize that way of thinking helps us better predict what Apple will do next.

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            That’s mainly my point: outside of AVX benefits, the cylindrical Mac Pro is a lateral upgrade. If you bought a 12 core, 2010 Mac Pro when it was introduced, you’ve been waiting over [i<]six years [/i<] for a replacement that moves everything forward. The problem is that Apple isn't thinking like the user base who actually wants professional machines. Apple is clearly putting form over function on a machine that is designed to do heavy work. That is why the cylindrical Mac Pro has been a sales failure. I think Apple needs to empathize with the Mac Pro users base to realize that some features that they want overlaps with what they need.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      They have been riding too long on Steve Job’s legacy and nobody is able to manage that fill up those large shoes yet.

        • blastdoor
        • 3 years ago

        I think you might be entirely wrong. I think what we might be seeing here is the downside of SJ’s legacy — a company that is unable to do more than a small handful of things at the same time, because key people become bottlenecks.

        SJ was able to scale that model better than most because he worked like a maniac, even on his deathbed. I respect his passion for his work. But even Jobs reached the limits of human endurance.

        Apple may have reached a size where being organized like a start-up just can’t work anymore.

        I don’t mean to suggest that Apple should turn into GE or Berkshire Hathaway. But I think they do need to figure out a way to modify their structure, because I don’t think this is working. Hopefully they can figure out a way to retain many of the advantages of the SJ model, but reduce the disadvantages. I wish I knew how to do that, but I don’t. I sincerely hope they figure it out.

    • Concupiscence
    • 3 years ago

    I get the feeling the touch strip’s supposed to be super-exciting, but the Function keys have endured because they’re tactile and allow you to perform certain actions without breaking your workflow to look at the keyboard. Say what you want about the flexibility of the touch strip – and some interesting applications probably do exist – but without that tactile feedback and muscle memory coming into play, it’s a poor fit for the [i<]modus operandi[/i<] of hardware keyboard use in the first place. I won't be the only one to say it, but Microsoft's Surface Dial got my attention in a much more positive way this go-around. Edit: would it really have killed them to leave the function keys intact, but put the strip above them? Maybe make the trackpad less gallingly huge to accommodate the addition?

      • Buub
      • 3 years ago

      While I understand where you’re coming from, I can’t remember the last time I reached for an F key.

      On the other hand, watch the promo video. The touch strip is literally another full multi-touch device, and they have done some really innovative things with it. It’s not just buttons, but any sort of input, like selecting ranges of things, pinch and swipe, etc. I’m impressed both with the slick implementation, and this actually seems to be an evolution of the idea of context-dependent, configurable input keys, which is what the function keys were originally designed to be.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        At first I was skeptical, but I’m buying into this. It’s way better than jamming your fingerprints all over the screen.

          • blastdoor
          • 3 years ago

          I agree too — I think it’s potentially a useful innovation. And I think it’s great to see TouchID *finally* integrated into a Mac.

          I’m just grumpy that it took so long to get it out the door and that the rest of the lineup continues to languish.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            I kinda want a 15″ one, but the price is going to keep me away from it for a long while. I imagine pretty soon we’ll see a Touch ID-less Touch Strip-enabled Apple keyboard, and iMacs with TouchID somewhere on the display. I’m a little surprised we didn’t see them today, though.

            And the Mac Mini and the Pro might as well not exist.

            I have no problem with Skylake throughout the entire lineup. What Intel has released so far in Kaby Lake appears to be the opposite of what companies want to sell right now.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            If I were a laptop kinda guy I guess I might want the 15″ too, but I’m weird — I don’t like laptops.

            It would be better to officially kill the Mini and the Pro than to leave people who want one in limbo. I’m clinging to my 2009 Mac Pro and a pathetic hope that maybe a worthy Mac Pro will be released before my old one finally keels over.

            After killing the Pro, they could add 6-10 core i7s and Nvidia GPUs as BTO options for the iMac.

            I guess realistically, I’ll probably find myself sometime in 2017 with a quad core iMac on my desk and a Linux box with a bunch of Xeon (or Zen) cores under my desk.

            • bhtooefr
            • 3 years ago

            Bingo.

            Apple needs eDRAM SKUs of Kaby Lake for the 13″ machine, which don’t exist, and they need quads for the 15″ machine, which don’t exist.

            Where Kaby Lake would fit today is the 12″ MacBook (where there’s a new Y SKU), and the Airs (where there’s new U SKUs without eDRAM). However, Apple may be a bit gunshy of new Intel architectures after Microsoft’s problems with Skylake early on, and the Airs have had their death warrant signed. The 11″ Air is discontinued, and I doubt the 13″ Air will move off of Broadwell (I think it’ll continue to exist as the entry-level budget Mac for education, though, for a couple years or so, much like the Mid-2012 13″ MacBook Pro that also got discontinued yesterday.)

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            Intel sucks. Everybody sucks.

            Why can’t we have nice things?

            (I’m not being sarcastic — I’m actually 90% serious)

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            I think Intel and Apple are both sitting on piles of unsold stock. Intel of Skylake quads, and Apple of unsold Haswell desktops.

        • slowriot
        • 3 years ago

        Except as of right now none of that carries over to the macOS desktop use scenario.

        I also frankly hate the idea of constantly looking down at the keyboard… and at a tiny strip even more. My neck frankly hurts just thinking about it.

        And basically all the use scenarios are for this fictional world where the majority of Mac users are super expert content creators. And if they were those people have spent years memorizing keyboard shortcuts, the one’s they’ll continue to use on their workstations with screens larger than 15).

        I like what its trying to address but frankly I think Razer did a better job years ago, just making it a small strip below the standard screen would have been much better IMO. . But Razer can’t control the software stack like Apple can.

      • End User
      • 3 years ago

      Are you Mike Lazaridis?

        • Concupiscence
        • 3 years ago

        I don’t know who that is, so unless I’m an amnesiac or having a drug-induced existential crisis, probably not.

          • End User
          • 3 years ago

          Mike had an obsession with physical keys. It led to his downfall.

      • Flying Fox
      • 3 years ago

      Agreed, Lenovo tried the context-aware touch bar thing on their 2nd gen ThinkPad X1 Carbon, none of my fellow coworkers liked it. On the next refresh, physical keys came back.

      But I suppose F-keys are more a Windows apps (non UWP) thing, so it makes more sense for the keys to return there. I wonder how would this play out with people Bootcamping into Windows.

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        I think f keys are far more used in windows. I use them daily. I don’t find that’s the case in OSX.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    Also worth noting, these MacBook Pros have cowardly 3.5mm headphone jacks.

    [url<]http://www.apple.com/macbook-pro/[/url<] In the comparison shot, it's clearly visible. edit: [s<]there's also dual-port 15" machine, too. It has weird parts in it. Tim didn't mention it, and if you go to the 15" model's Buy page, you have to scroll down to find it. [/s<] Never mind, this was the previous entry-level MacBook Pro with a Haswell Iris Pro part.

    • Zalansho
    • 3 years ago

    I can’t resist…

    Press F to pay your respects.

    *ducks*

    • adisor19
    • 3 years ago

    Canadian prices are scary.

    And the Magsafe being gone is sad sad sad..

    And let’s not talk about the Mac Mini or the Pro that are crying somewhere in a corner.

    Edit : also, DUAL 5K external display support is only for the 15″ model. The 13″ only supports a single 5K display. *sigh*

    Not sure I come away impressed with this. I was expecting quite a bit more.

    Adi

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Not sure I come away impressed with this.[/quote<] JUST ASK KROGOTH.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      I’m sure the 13″ only supports a single display because of the Intel graphics, not because of some other arbitrary decision. None of the TB3 15″ models rely solely on the iGPU.

        • adisor19
        • 3 years ago

        Would have thought that Intel got thier *hit together with Skylate. Ugh.

        Does anyone know if KabbyLake made any progress on this front ?

        Adi

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          The ARK says this about Kaby Lake:

          Max Resolution (HDMI 1.4)‡ 4096×2304@24Hz
          Max Resolution (DP)‡ 4096×2304@60Hz
          Max Resolution (eDP – Integrated Flat Panel)‡ 4096×2304@60Hz
          [url<]http://ark.intel.com/products/95443/Intel-Core-i5-7200U-Processor-3M-Cache-up-to-3_10-GHz[/url<] Constrast that with Skylake, and it's actually an improvement: Graphics Output eDP/DP/HDMI Max Resolution (HDMI 1.4)‡ 2560X1600@60Hz Max Resolution (DP)‡ 3840x2160@60Hz [url<]http://ark.intel.com/products/84985/Intel-Core-i5-5257U-Processor-3M-Cache-up-to-3_10-GHz[/url<] Also, MacRumors says that the 5K display uses MST. [url<]http://www.macrumors.com/2016/10/27/apple-4k-5k-lg-displays-new-macbook-pro/[/url<] My guess is that Skylake can drive a pair of those 2160p DisplayPort streams and combines them for use in this 5K display. The Radeon Pro must either drive 5K natively or can just drive twice as many 4K streams.

            • adisor19
            • 3 years ago

            In other words, I should wait until the Kaby Lake refresh for the 13″ MBP before diving in.

            At the current prices, I can definitely do that.

            Adi

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah, if you need two 5K displays, I would say that’s the best course of action.

      • sweatshopking
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<] Not sure I come away impressed with this. [/quote<] THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      Oh wow, i forgot about magsafe. What a shame. It was really nice.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Yeeep. The 15″ base model with just the upgraded GPU was like 3200, and then 15% tax, so like 3700 or so out the door…Yikes.

      I was thinking I may have sold my 15″ rMBP and upgraded for a few hundred, but with the price hike and the crap CAD it would be enough to build a gaming desktop with the difference.

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    such courage

      • uni-mitation
      • 3 years ago

      Dear Firestarter:

      Indeed. I am amazed by the courageous design decisions that they make out of thin air. Apple should indeed be called the Courageous Company that shook the world!

      BTW, I hear they are looking to release a brand new underrated product called the Apple Abacus.

      Apple: Courageous

      Uni-mitation

        • pranav0091
        • 3 years ago

        Where can I buy your time machine?

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Before we forget: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/21544/razer-intros-ultra-slim-gaming-notebook[/url<] And in a regular keyboard: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/22313/razer-brings-switchblade-ui-to-standalone-keyboard[/url<]

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    *Strokes chin*

    Tell me about this Radeon Pro 450, Apple…

    Also…Does AMD just give Apple free reign to make up GPU names now? Radeon Pro was real branding, but the 450 doesn’t seem to exist. Similar to the D series in the Mac Pro.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Tell me about this Radeon Pro 450, Apple... [/quote<] It's Polaris 11. The precise details of clockspeeds/number of activated cores/thermals are fuzzy, however.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        There’s a little detail here:

        [url<]http://creators.radeon.com/radeon-pro/[/url<] "up to" 1024 stream processors. My guess is that's what's in the 460. edit: click "Radeon Pro" on the right side of the page and get lots of detail

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Here it is

      [url<]https://twitter.com/RyanSmithAT/status/791737906905829376[/url<]

        • Jeff Kampman
        • 3 years ago

        Or, y’know, [url<]https://techreport.com/news/30881/radeon-pro-specs-hint-at-a-full-fat-polaris-11-gpu-in-macbook-pros[/url<]

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          Stop schilling for other people’s websites on TR man!

          • tipoo
          • 3 years ago

          Never heard of that site, sounds sketch!

          I kid, I kid, saw the tweet first 😛

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      It’s probably semi custom in nature. Amd has been pretty active in semi custom jobs lately.

      Technically it might not be semi custom, but those particular GPUs probably wouldn’t exist in that fashion of not for Apple. I’d say it’s similar to how Tonga was basically commissioned by Apple (or at least Apple had tremendous influence).

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