Alphacool Eispumpe VPP755 pumps new ideas into D5 design

The German Wasserkühlung enthusiasts at Alphacool have introduced the VPP755 Eispumpe, the successor to their VP655 line of pumps. The new pump maintains the D5 form factor for compatibility with existing tops and brackets. The company says the pump's internals are completely new, with a design based on a ceramic shaft instead of spherical bearings. Alphacool says the new design uses about half the power, runs quieter, and vibrates less than their older pumps, while maintaining a four-meter head. The company posted a video featuring its always-entertaining spokesman here.

The new Eispumpe is powered over ye olde four-pin Molex power connector. An integrated five-position switch limits pump speed to selectable maximums from 1800 to 4500 RPM. The pump speed can be read via a three-pin fan connector. If the manual switch is used in conjunction with PWM control over a four-pin fan connection, the pump will not exceed the RPM set by the throttle position.

Visually, the VPP755 Eispumpe is about 3/8" (10 mm) shorter than the old pump, and sports a new aluminum cap. The pump accepts 8V to 13V, and consumes 14W at full-tilt in order to move 350 L per hour. The VPP755 Eispumpe is available now from Alphacool for 70€. The VPP755 comes à la carte—the brackets and pump top pictured above aren't included.

Comments closed
    • Pholostan
    • 3 years ago

    I think the most impressive part is the huge head pressure of this pump. And at a lower power consumption at that. 4 meters of head pressure is not bad, not bad at all. Specs reminds me more of a DDC type pump than a D5 type.

    • DrCR
    • 3 years ago

    It’s interesting to me how broad the WCing spectrum is, as the performance numbers look humorous compared to my Iwaki MD20-Z (which admittedly is collecting dust due to a Thermalright filling my present needs).

      • Shobai
      • 3 years ago

      A bunch of people would prefer to play with low voltage toys, rather than mains powered ones, I guess. Plus, at a rated 50 dBA @ 1m [assuming yours is the MD-20RZ] I can see why you’d want something quieter!

    • juzz86
    • 3 years ago

    Solid idea.

    The amount of gear on the market compatible with the good ol’ D5 means that keeping the form-factor is a sound plan.

    A little disappointed they didn’t take the chance to migrate 12V across to SATA, but I can overlook that. Aluminium housing will help, getting rid of the BBs is another step in the right direction.

    Couple that with the relatively modest price increase and it looks like the ‘D7’ will be a winner!

    • Mr Bill
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like aquarium pump technology has made it into PC cooling.

      • nexxcat
      • 3 years ago

      Aquarium pumps have been driving high-end PC cooling for decades.

        • Mr Bill
        • 3 years ago

        Whatever…
        [quote<]"The company says the pump's internals are completely new, with a design based on a ceramic shaft instead of spherical bearings."[/quote<]

          • juzz86
          • 3 years ago

          Nexxcat is correct. Before the D5s and DDCs of the world came along, you would find an Eheim or an Iwaki pump in most watercooling setups. If you go the AquaComputer route, you still see the venerable Eheim units doing the rounds, just in new livery.

          Of course, this was also long before tailor-made tubing, compression fittings and reservoirs 🙂

            • f0d
            • 3 years ago

            back when we used to use car heater cores for radiators….

            ahh those were the days.!

            • juzz86
            • 3 years ago

            You know it mate!

            I remember having an old heater core submerged in my outdoor rainwater tank, pumping some Ethylene Glycol mix I pinched from work – and about thirty foot of garden hose, haha.

            • Mr Bill
            • 3 years ago

            I was responding to the ceramic shaft/bearing design. That has been in aquarium pumps for probably over 20 years. I’ve had one or more aquariums since 1967. I think I bought my first powerheads in the late 1980’s and they probably had ceramic shaft and bearings.

            • juzz86
            • 3 years ago

            +1, my mistake champ 🙂

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