ROG G701VI takes a GTX 1080 and a 120-Hz screen on the go

Asus' progression of Pascal-powered portables proceeds with the updated ROG G701, called the G701VI. This 17.3" gaming laptop is mostly unchanged from the previous version, which was itself a somewhat saner version of the ludicrous GX700 water-cooled gaming laptop. The real magic here comes courtesy of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 1080 and the attached 120Hz G-Sync display.

Asus says this is the world's first laptop to wield a 120Hz panel with G-Sync support. Asus is vague about what type of panel the display uses, but does refer to it as "wide viewing-angle." Earlier rumors stated that Asus would be using AHVA panels in its ROG laptops, so that might be the case here. In any event, the GTX 1080 should be plenty capable of pushing the 1920×1080 display to its limits. Asus claims the GTX 1080 in the G701VI performs "within 10 percent" of its desktop cousin. 

In keeping with its gaming cred, the G701VI's chiclet-style keyboard offers 30-key rollover support. Users get a whole pile of ports to plug things into, as well, including an HDMI 2.0 port, a mini-DisplayPort, two USB 3.1 Type-C ports (one of which is Thunderbolt 3-enabled), and three regular old USB 3.0 ports.

Besides the fancy GPU and screen, the machine is unchanged from its predecessor. That means buyers have the option of a Core i7-6700HQ or unlocked Core i7-6820HK CPU. Asus equips the machine with 2400 MT/s DDR4 memory, and the G701VI will take up to 64GB. On the storage side, the machine will take at least two PCI Express M.2 SSDs. Asus will RAID 0 those drives for owners out-of-the-box, too. There's no mention of a 2.5" drive bay, but given the laptop's 1.3"-thick profile, there may not be one inside.

Asus hasn't announced pricing or availability information for the ROG G701VI.

Comments closed
    • Airmantharp
    • 3 years ago

    I’m not getting the complaints about the keyboard. A good ‘chiclet’ keyboard has scissor switches that get you nearly all of the ‘feel’ of a mechanical keyboard.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 3 years ago

      I guess I can’t really argue since I don’t know your definition of a “good” chiclet keyboard, but if it’s anything like a MacBook Pro which seems to be the standard that everything is compared against, then it’s not that good. Better than many other keyboards, but not that good. Unfortunately I haven’t had the pleasure to type on a thinkpad, but that’s about the only laptop keyboard that people give positive marks. The problem is that all laptops pretty much have bad keyboards. Asus have some of the worst in my experience.

        • VincentHanna
        • 3 years ago

        No, i’m pretty sure that the standard against which all things are measured, at least on these forums is the Lenovo Thinkpad.

          • DeadOfKnight
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]No, i'm pretty sure that the standard against which all things [used to be] measured, at least on these forums is the [IBM] Thinkpad.[/quote<] Fixed.

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    If Razer can make a mechanical keyboard this thin, gaming laptops really aught to be jumping on that train. What, is the 17 inch gaming laptop concerned about weight?

    [url<]http://www.razerzone.com/ca-en/gaming-keyboards-keypads/razer-mechanical-keyboard-case-ipad-pro[/url<]

      • Spunjji
      • 3 years ago

      Does it actually matter, though? In terms of user experience? Because right now it seems like yet another expensive marketing tickbox.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      Ok gerbils. School me. I thought the entire point of a mechanical keyboard was to have a satisfying throw of more than 3mm and a custom actuation profile (linear or with hysteresis) while making cute noises to sound like you’re a Real Serious Typist.

      Is there any serious benefit to these thin “mechanical” keyboards that probably feel similar to high-quality standard chiclets? What’s the point? And is typing on a mobile gaming machine [i<]that you can plug a mechanical keyboard into[/i<] so bad that you absolutely have to scoff at a product you were never going to buy anyway?

    • Tumbleweed
    • 3 years ago

    All that tech and they go with a shitty keyboard? WTH? Mechanical keyboard or GTFO.

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      It’s a laptop that’s barely thicker than [i<]my entire keyboard.[/i<] There's no such thing as a satisfying laptop keyboard, so why spend time, money, and waste space on it?

    • thesmileman
    • 3 years ago

    “Asus says this is the world’s first laptop to wield a 120Hz panel with G-Sync support.”

    This isn’t true. Aorus has had their 1080p and 1440p ones out for a month and both have 120hz and Gsync support.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      I sort of thought that was the case and that’s why I put the words in their mouth where they belonged. I looked around a bit for a 120Hz G-Sync display in a laptop but couldn’t find any evidence of same. I obviously didn’t look at Aorus though. Thanks for the confirmation. 🙂

        • Neutronbeam
        • 3 years ago

        I think you can find a few here [url<]http://www.xoticpc.com[/url<].

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    G-Sync eh? Isn’t Nvidia G-Sync on laptops basically just VESA adaptive sync with no special hardware at all? I guess they have to justify the premium somehow

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, it’s nvidia’s Freesync. Which we will see on the desktop in two-thousand-never.

        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago

        oh great! *holds breath*

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      As long as they hold onto 70-80% of the consumer graphics market, they can do whatever they want.

      • travbrad
      • 3 years ago

      I agree it’s all a bit silly but it’s not like a high-end gaming laptop was ever going to be cheap in the first place, or have good battery life, or be good value, or do most of the things laptops are supposed be good at.

        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago

        but with the G-Sync stamp it will be $200 more expensive than it would have been otherwise

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, that $200 G-Sync FPGA doesn’t come for free.

          Oh, wait.

          • rahulahl
          • 3 years ago

          Pretty sure the mobile version does not have that $200 module.

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            does that matter though? You’re going to pay for it anyway

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