Xigmatek Talon H case makes room for a baker’s dozen of hard drives

If you like cases that can double as cages for misbehaving children, you might take a liking to Xigmatek's new Talon H. The company describes its new case as a "Super Tower." The appellation fits, thanks to the chassis' ten expansion slots and support for motherboards in sizes up to E-ATX, XL-ATX, and HP-TX. The case can also fit up to 13 disk drives.

All the drive trays are removable and support 2.5" and 3.5" drives. The drive cages themselves come out in three sets, but even with all of them installed, the case will take video cards up to 15.7" (40 cm) in length. We suspect the 7.9" (20 cm) maximum CPU cooler height should suffice for most builds. Don't throw out your Chieftecs just yet, since the Talon H "only" has four external 5.25" drive bays.

The Talon H has significant capacity for airflow despite its smooth-looking exterior, with room for a total of seven fans. Xigmatek includes a pair of 140-mm fans in the front, hidden away behind a swing-out door. Another 140-mm fan comes mounted at the rear of the case. Builders can then install their own hardware in the top of the case: three 120- or 140-mm fans, a 200-mm fan, or radiators up to 420mm in length. Xigmatek even hid away the the front panel connectors—four USB 3.0 ports and two USB 2.0 ports, plus audio connectors—under a small door on top of the case.

Those looking to splurge on all this glorious excess may have to wait a bit. Xigmatek has yet to announce pricing or availability for the Talon H.

Comments closed
    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Honest question: what motherboards actually have connections for 13 drives and assumedly at least 1 optical drive (14 total)?

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Very very few indeed, the only one I can think off is [url=http://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/X99%20Extreme11/<]this one[/url<] although there was another soldered-on J1900 pentium board with 12 ports I think (also by Asrock) designed for a home NAS.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      A few years ago I built a system (at work) based on an Asus ASUS KCMA-D8 motherboard. 6 SATA ports on the motherboard plus an optional daughtercard (which we did install) with 8 more.

      There are also cards like [url=https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002RL8I7M/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=<]this[/url<].

        • MOSFET
        • 3 years ago

        So amusing that the linked controller card also doubles as a Dell PERC H200, which gives it pathetic cache-less firmware-based “RAID abilities” AND a MUCH lower queue depth also!

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          They work perfectly fine for non-parity RAID. I have an H200 flashed to Avago firmware in IR mode for my SSD array. Maxes out the PCIe bus with ease.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, you’d probably need a controller card if you wanted to fill all of those drive bays.

      • superjawes
      • 3 years ago

      In order to connect that many, you would probably need some sort of PCI(e) card to add enough SATA ports. BTW, it’s 17 drives total if you max the 5.25″ bays.

      The real issue I see is getting enough power and routing it to all those drives. At what point do you just start cutting your own wire?

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]The real issue I see is getting enough power and routing it to all those drives.[/quote<] That too.

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        Any modern PSU with a beefy 12V rail ought to be able to handle a substantial pile of drives. SATA power splitters are cheap; no need to roll your own.

        Edit: Heck, even a rather pedestrian Corsair CX500 doesn’t seem to have a problem handling 8 drives; surely one of the higher wattage enthusiast units can handle 14 drives without even breaking a sweat, provided you don’t have some sort of monster overclocked SLI/CrossFire setup.

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          I have 21 drives in my NAS. No special power supply needed, just figure 10 watts per drive (which is probably a high estimate) and add it to the 12v consumption when determining PSU ratings.

            • just brew it!
            • 3 years ago

            They can draw quite a bit more than that when they spin up; but even so, it really should not be an issue. It was more of a problem back in the day when the available PSU wattage was spread out across the 3.3V, 5V, and 12V rails, instead of nearly all of it being available on the 12V rail.

            Many controllers support delayed spinup as well, which keeps the surge from all the drives hitting the PSU at once.

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            Older drives can certainly pull 20 or 30 watts during spin up but any decent RAID card or HBA should support staggered spin up if you end up needing it.

            I like the 10 watt average number for PSU planning because modern drives are lower than that, much lower at idle, but it gives you an appropriate amount of headroom to maintain efficiency on your PSU.

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      you can buy controller cards that can populate that much and much more.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This