Youtube now lets users watch cat videos in glorious HDR

Youtube announced support for streaming HDR video in its blog today, along with a short playlist of sample videos. The streaming site supports HDR video in a variety of resolutions from 720p (1280×720) to 4K (3840×2160) and frame rates from 23.976 to 60 FPS. On that note, viewers will need an HDR display along with a playback device that supports HDR output.

Youtube specifically mentions its Chromecast Ultra as a good option to fill the role of a playback device. The Verge reports that the Xbox One S and HDR-capable Blu-Ray players can also view HDR Youtube content. Viewers without supported display equipment can still watch any video uploaded in HDR as plain SDR.

The site also published information about its requirements for uploading HDR video on its support section. The requirements page notes that software partner Blackmagic's DaVinci Resolve is currently "the only software that exports files with standards-compliant metadata out of the box." The free version of the software appears to offer limited HDR support.

Comments closed
    • rutra80
    • 3 years ago

    I call it bullsheet.
    First, HDR exists to preserve details in lights & shadows, while at these bitrates the first thing that every lossy video codec does, is cutting out the details in lights & shadows. What’s the point of storing with higher precision something that is cut out? You can see the blocks on gondolas in video with the tiger. Special quantization matrices could be used to alleviate the problem but still it would need higher bitrates. Slow scenes are like that by design in these videos – fast action scenes would be even more laughable.
    Second, chroma subsampling is more of an eye-cancer than lack of HDR, and these videos still suffer from it – again, in video with tiger you can see the scene with skateboard decorated with red patterns – notice the pixellization just before the cut.
    Beside oversaturation and decreased contrast (at last, after years of 10000000:1 contrast hype) there’s nothing extraordinary in these videos.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t know enough about video streaming, but will HDR compete with other video quality options for Youtube’s maximum bandwidth/bitrate? E.g. will adding HDR require a trade-off in resolution, compression, frames per second, etc?

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      Depends on the format, but yeah.

      • Ifalna
      • 3 years ago

      Of course it will.
      After all it’s more data that has to be fit in somehow.

    • Airmantharp
    • 3 years ago

    Now for the *real* fun part: where are the consumer video recording devices that support HDR capture?

    Hell, where are the *professional* ones?

    😉

      • Mad_Dane
      • 3 years ago

      [url<]http://nofilmschool.com/2015/01/panasonic-introduces-new-4k-cameras-hdr-movie-recording[/url<]

        • Airmantharp
        • 3 years ago

        Good catch!

        This might work for consumer uses- but the challenge with HDR is that you’ll want to be recording with something that can capture and encode an even wider color and contrast space than the output codecs used by the likes of YouTube, similar to RAW files for stills, and then ‘compress’ them to the HDR space.

        These cameras, outside of say the likes of RED, do not exist, even though many cameras sport sensors that can positively capture the needed color and contrast range.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Yup

    • hasseb64
    • 3 years ago

    Do we get the pop-up commercials in HDR too? Would be awesome!

      • lycium
      • 3 years ago

      The skill of preemptively turning down the volume before ad breaks will be replaced by the skill of preemptively putting on sunglasses before ad breaks.

      DON’T DELAY, JOIN OUR FITNESS PROGRAM TODAY!! *hair singeing and ears ringing*

    • Anomymous Gerbil
    • 3 years ago

    And yet:

    [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2016/11/4k-game-analyzers-say-youtube-isnt-good-enough-unveil-new-video-site/[/url<]

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Sanity. Youtube moving to 4K before being remotely close to saturating the possible fidelity of 1080p always bugged me, and as Richard notes, for fast moving videos like games, the compression can actually make 4K have lower motion resolution than 1080p.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    the first sample is quite nice. looking forward to HDR videos!

    • Unknown-Error
    • 3 years ago

    Meeeeooooow!

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder if they’ll update the iOS and Android apps for those phones (like my 7+) that support HDR?

    • Mikael33
    • 3 years ago

    Are there any actual monitors that support HDR out?
    Btw do any pc games output 10 bit color if available?

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      Plenty of TV’s. At least there’s that.

        • Mikael33
        • 3 years ago

        I’m aware, that’s why I stated actual monitors 🙂

          • webs0r
          • 3 years ago

          It’s not just that, Microsoft / nv/AMD also have to do something as well.

          Hopefully this accelerates the doing of something. How many more decades will pass before we have Windows being colour-aware?

          What I’m talking about here is able to have legacy apps render in sRGB, while you watch a HDR video in a browser video potentially in DCI-P3 gamut, without stretching the legacy sRGB colors and without blowing out the white bits into HDR territory, and maybe you have an Adobe app next to that rendering in AdobeRGB.

          All working nicely together. The video card is outputting the largest gamut Bt.2020 to the monitor that supports this large gamut + HDR rendering. You don’t have to switch colour spaces on the monitor, it just works and it works side by side (none of this – have to switch to exclusive rendering mode to get 10 bit output nonsense).

      • webs0r
      • 3 years ago

      On the 10 bit colour, there may be a few. I remember Alien isolation did.

      It’s a bit meh though – if games dithered properly you would find it impossible to tell the difference between 8 and 10 bit. They already render at high bit depth internally and convert down for output to the screen. I don’t know why some titles have so much banding in the final output.

      Of course I support moving forward regardless of dithering properly – similar to my post below. We need to get the desktop to move from 8 bit per channel to 10/12…

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        I think drivers can do dithering too. I know there’s an AMD registry option for it, but I haven’t tested if it’s a video-only thing or if it affects games too.

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]The requirements page notes that software partner Blackmagic's DaVinci Resolve is currently "the only software that exports files with standards-compliant metadata out of the box."[/quote<] Wait... So is HDR not an open standard or anything? Plenty of 10 bit encoders exist, what kind of other metadata would you even need?

      • ArdWar
      • 3 years ago

      I bet it’s colorspace rendering information. Mainstream monitors and default setting of many pro monitor are still calibrated in sRGB.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      TV HDR encompasses brightness changes as well. Effectively dynamic contrast that’s controlled by the content rather than imposed by the screen’s image processors.

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        Wouldn’t that still boil down to a 0-1023 luma value?

        Modulating an LCD backlight instead of leaving it on max could help dark scenes, but that’s something the TV/monitor should deal with, right? It should have the information it needs by just looking at the average brightness of the pixels in a scene.

        EDIT: I guess it doesn’t… Interesting that they include it, as this would be useless in future OLED panels.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    4K 144Hz 1800R curved HDR AMOLED Freesync display, where are you?

      • kuraegomon
      • 3 years ago

      Hanging out in 2018 where it belongs, of course 🙂 And you’re lucky you didn’t stick a price-cap on your request, otherwise, you’d be looking at 2020 😀

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      It arrives Q4 2017, but the Freesync range is 140-144Hz

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t worry. When it arrives, everybody will be bitching because they’re “at anything more than $150, it’s an expensive toy.”

        • DancinJack
        • 3 years ago

        p much

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        I just bought a 75hz dell 24 inch IPS for 115$ taxes in CAD with a three year advanced exchange warranty. It would have to be ONE hell of a monitor to get me to shell out all the extra cash likely coming.

          • DancinJack
          • 3 years ago

          75Hz lol

    • DancinJack
    • 3 years ago

    Great, but display makers need to catch up.

    1440p+Gsync+>=120Hz+HDR(both versions)+IPS/VA for not 800 bucks kthx

      • Shobai
      • 3 years ago

      “OK, $1000 it is!”

        • DancinJack
        • 3 years ago

        hahah yeah 🙁

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      The 27″ GSync IPS monitors would seem to cover all those bases (except HDR?).

        • Ifalna
        • 3 years ago

        And the “not 800€” 😀

          • Kretschmer
          • 3 years ago

          XG2703-GS is $600 on Newegg, while the XB271HU is $780.

            • Ifalna
            • 3 years ago

            940€ over here <_<

            • Kretschmer
            • 3 years ago

            Maybe you should live in a country that uses Freedom Dollars(TM).

            • Ifalna
            • 3 years ago

            *chuckles*, yes, in terms of getting Hardware on the cheap that would indeed be advantageous.
            But thanks, I’ll pass.

            • Kretschmer
            • 3 years ago

            There are other concerns than hardware?

            • Ifalna
            • 3 years ago

            *scratches head* I think there should be. Now I am no longer sure… :X

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