Asus ROG Claymore keyboard can be cut in two

Asus' ROG Claymore Series keyboards have just entered the growing ranks of gaming keyboards stuffed with Cherry MX RGB switches, with one small twist: a detachable 10-key pad that can go on either side of the keyboard by way of direct physical contact. The ROG Claymore includes the whole enchilada: the main keyboard and the ten-key block. Meanwhile, the ROG Claymore Core offers only the lonesome primary keyboard, though Asus says the ten-key block is available separately should buyers change their minds. Asus will offer the ROG Claymore with a choice of Cherry MX Red, Blue, Brown, or Black switches.

The ROG Claymore ships with nine predefined RGB illumination profiles that can be selected with key shortcuts alone. Asus's Aura software should offer per-key programmable illumination and a mode that lets the lighting reflect the CPU temperature. The manufacturer also claims the "synergy of the ROG ecosystem" allows for coordinated RGB illumination with other Asus hardware. Gamers with compatible Asus motherboards can also use the keyboard for fancy operations like starting the computer, defining BIOS settings, and clearing the CMOS memory.

The ten-key unit with an integrated volume control wheel can be used on the right-hand side for number entry or sit at the left of the keyboard for use as a programmable macro pad. The usual gaming keyboard claims of N-key rollover, anti-ghosting, 50-million keystroke durability, and 1000-Hz polling rate all apply to the ROG Claymore. Both the Claymore "Core" and the ten-key number pad include height-adjustable feet along with rubber pads for extra grip. Finally, the keyboard named after an unwieldy Scottish sword is inexplicably decorated with "Mayan patterns."

Comments closed
    • Wirko
    • 3 years ago

    That roller … Is it heated? It would be so useful if it doubles as an anti-carpal-tunnel-syndrome massage roller.

    • RdVi
    • 3 years ago

    I like this idea. I have a MS sculpt ergomic wireless keyboard I got on sale a year ago. I wanted a split keyboard that was somewhat modern for daily use and it’s been pretty decent. The seperate numpad has been great though. Having the option to put my keyboard closer to my mouse has been great. I actually have a large mousepad that I have turned so that it is taller than wide. I put the numpad on the top left corner of it so that it sits above the keyboard. I find that this is just as in reach as a normal numpad but also doesn’t clash with my mouse. It’s not a good gaming keyboard, but my corsair K70 broke after 18 months so I’m over paying too much on mechanical keyboards.

    That said this thing looks ugly. I like the idea though.

      • JAMF
      • 3 years ago

      You could check out the Aorus K7 Thunder (a Gigabyte brand).

      [url<]http://www.aorus.com/Product/Features/THUNDER%20K7[/url<]

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 years ago

        Nice keyboard. I’m also looking at the Orion G910 as a replacement for my k70.

          • JAMF
          • 3 years ago

          I’m looking for one that has the cursor keys and the Home/End cluster on the numpad island, top the right of the numpad. I like using the numpad for games that use lean L/R and jump/crouch, with the Home/End cluster in reach of the left-hand thumb/index for quick access of handy toggles. One reason to visit the Aorus forum and post a suggestion thread. 🙂

    • crystall
    • 3 years ago

    Clay, more

    • FranzVonPapen
    • 3 years ago

    ” a detachable 10-key pad that can be go on either side”

    Yeah, it sure can be go anywhere!

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      That’s now begone 😉

    • Variable
    • 3 years ago

    I can already see those Mayan patterns filling up with dust and grime. What a terrible design idea.

    • nico1982
    • 3 years ago

    Wait, are those… function keys? Cowards!

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      It balances out–there’s no headphone jack.

    • ron_nelson
    • 3 years ago

    This seems like a great idea, depending on how well it’s implemented.

    It’s bugged me that the num keypad pushes right-handed mouse so far off-center from my body. Being able to keep the keypad available as needed without needing to reach to the right for the mouse is a good thing IMO.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      This is not the first time it’s been done. Microsoft did it a few years back.

    • meerkt
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]N-key rollover, anti-ghosting[/quote<]I thought these two are the same thing? [quote<]1000-Hz polling rate[/quote<]Pfft. My keyboard can do 1000MHz!

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      NKRO means you can press N different keys at the same time and all will be registered.
      Anti-ghosting means that you can press keys many times over a short interval before the buffer is full and the last keypress is lost.

      For example, ghosting would occur if you held “A” and “B” together for a few seconds.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    If you give me an old-fashioned claymore I can cut most keyboards in two.
    Maybe not the original Model-M though.

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      Can you also post a video of you doing it? Maybe have a roundup and find out which keyboards take the most effort.

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        I smell a new Youtube channel…

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          Maybe you could finally find a metric to conclusively prove that mechanical keyboards are superior to dome keyboards. “Claymore Survival Rating”.

            • emredjan
            • 3 years ago

            “I never use keyboards with CSR less than 6.0”

          • superjawes
          • 3 years ago

          “Will it claymore?”

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      pfft, I could use an M18 Claymore and split it into LOTS of tiny pieces.

        • maxxcool
        • 3 years ago

        bahahahahah

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