Lian Li’s dual-chamber PC-O10 case is slim and svelte

Dual-chamber computer cases are an intriguing option for builders who want to separate heat-generating CPUs and graphics cards from other components. Those dual-chamber cases like Lian Li's PC-O9 tend to have an unmistakably square profile, however. For those who want to a dual-chamber layout but insist that computers should be rectangular, Lian Li has a new case: the PC-O10.

The PC-O10 might be slimmer than the PC-O9, but it's by no means a small case. It has room for motherboards in sizes up to E-ATX. The seven expansion slots provide plenty of room for multi-GPU setups, and the back compartment can hold four 3.5" drives and two 2.5" drives. For cooling, the top panel can either fit two 120-mm exhaust fans or a 240-mm liquid cooling radiator. Builders can either put two 120-mm fans or one 140-mm fan on the bottom panel for cool air intake. All fan mounts include removable mesh dust filters.

For the new model, Lian Li kept the PC-O9's half-glass, half-aluminum look. Glass panels on the front and left side of the case show off the motherboard, CPU, and graphics card, while the important but less-attractive power supply, storage drives, and cables get tucked into the second compartment. The PC-O10 is styled more conservatively than its older brother. In slimming down the case, Lian Li removed the thick vertical band that encircled the PC-O9.

Speaking of getting slim, Lian Li managed to significantly reduce the width of the PC-O10. The case measures 9.5" x 19.4" x 14.8" (24 cm x 49 cm x 38 cm), which means that it's over 4" narrower than the PC-O9. Lian Li accomplished this primarily by limiting the space of the back compartment. As a result, the case only accommodates SFX power supplies. The windowed half of the case is also a bit slimmer than its counterpart in the PC-O9, as it's limited to CPU coolers no taller than 130mm. Addtionally, the back panel is only wide enough to fit 80mm fans.

Although we couldn't find a listing for this case while writing in the wee hours of the morning, Lian Li says the case is available now on Newegg for $279. If you like the case but would rather get it for free, check out the company's ongoing Thanksgiving giveaway.

Comments closed
    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    svelte is the new creamy

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Why is it still so tall if they moved the power supply to [i<]behind[/i<] the motherboard instead of above or below. Now you have to buy an overpriced, underpowered, limited-choice, short-cabled SFX PSU for your full-size, full-width case. There is no upside. In the list of pros and cons for this case layout, the pros list is just empty.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]short-cabled SFX PSU for your full-size, full-width case. [/quote<] Good point!! And since the majority of GPUs these days don't have any problems sticking up 1.5" past the expansion bracket whilst protruding the PCIe power connectors in the same direction, the limited width in the main compartment is sure to cause issues

      • colinstu12
      • 3 years ago

      <deleted> made a mistake.

      • BillyBuerger
      • 3 years ago

      Well, they do offer their own SFX PSU which I assume was made for this and possibly other cases they may make. Silverstone makes some as well for some of their SFF “gaming” cases. And Corsair even has one. So there are options. And since the PSU is right behind the MB with holes for the wiring around, it probably doesn’t need wires that are overly long. The CPU power one will still need to be pretty long though. But not as long as bottom-mounted PSUs.

      But yeah, I didn’t notice at first how tall this thing is. Seems they wanted to make room for large radiators on both the top and bottom. Although the bottom seems a bit small to push a large amount of air through it. I like that their trying something different here. But it doesn’t seem like it quite makes up for it’s oddities.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Heh, what’s the highest Wattage SFX PSU you can get? 700W?

        Given that this case is sacrificing layout and PSU compatibility to make room for two 240mm radiators, it implies it’s for seriously high-power hardware. Would you trust an OC’d Broadwell-E and two overclocked GPUs to a 700W SFX PSU? No. Then you don’t need 480mm of radiator clearance! 😉

          • BillyBuerger
          • 3 years ago

          The Lian-Li one goes up to 750W. GeForce Titan X is 250W. Two of them is 500W leaving 250W for the CPU and other stuff. You might be limited on overclocking but it’s doable. Although I didn’t think the Titan X was really all that better then the 1080 for gaming so that’s would mean 360W for the pair and 390W for the rest which should still leave a good amount of room for overclocking. But yeah, if you’re going to go that nuts on a system, there are other cases that would be better. A more reasonably spec’d PC wouldn’t be a problem with the SFX PSU options.

          But I agree with you that it’s silly to make the case so big to support something that doesn’t make sense.

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      This would be interesting (if not compelling) as a fairly inexpensive case. At $300, my response is “why?”

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      Looks like they were trying to avoid using a basement at all costs to practicality. I really wish someone would design a case like this with the opposite approach. Make the display compartment as thin as possible with the ram and i/o limitations (assume aio cooling and provide 360 rad mounting points in the rear). Provide some ssd mounting points and a slim optic mount in the rear, then cram everything else into the base which you could make wider and windowless. You wouldn’t be able to mount it on a wall, but the center of gravity and wider base would make it a perfect vertical stand.

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