Qualcomm taps Samsung’s 10-nm process for its Snapdragon 835

Qualcomm and Samsung announced this morning that the next "premium" Snapdragon SoC, the Snapdragon 835, is already in production on Samsung's 10-nm FinFET process. This will be the first major revision of Qualcomm's top-end processor since the 820 introduced the company's custom Kryo CPU core.

Qualcomm and Samsung have worked together many times before, of course. Samsung fabbed the Snapdragon 820 on its 14-nm FinFET process, and ultimately used that processor in the Galaxy S7. The Korean company says its new 10-nm process allows "up to a 30% increase in area efficiency" compared to the previous 14nm technology. That apparently translates into the designer's choice of 27% higher performance or 40% lower power consumption.

Snapdragon chips are among the fastest ARM-based processors outside of Apple's devices, so the 835 should be impressive when it comes. Samsung says the 835 is expected to ship in devices in the first half of 2017.

Comments closed
    • psuedonymous
    • 3 years ago

    Remember, 10nm LPE != 10nm LPP. This is suitable for tiny cores like phone SoCs, but not for big dies like CPUs and GPUIs. Don’t go getting all hot and bothered over Zen releasing on 10nm or the like, that’s a couple of years out yet.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Huh? Who’s talking about Zen? 😉

    • blastdoor
    • 3 years ago

    On the same(-ish) process, Apple’s single-threaded CPU performance dominates the ARM competition.

    But this will be a case where Qualcomm is a node ahead.

    On WebXPRT, the A10 beats the 820 by about 66%. (TSMC 16nm vs Samsung 14 nm)

    So at least on that benchmark, it will take more than the process shrink to catch Apple. Will Qualcomm be able to bridge the rest of the gap with design improvements? We shall see…

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    No plans to get Zen next year. I’ll wait for the 10nm shrink. Maybe 2018?

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    Did they say anything about the memory it uses?

    I’ve been waiting to see Samsung’s Wide I/O (aka diet HBM/HMC) in a phone for some time, but I haven’t heard a peep about it for awhile. It has alot of potential to help phones, as the GPU desperately needs the extra bandwidth, the CPU could use the lower latency, the whole thing could use the lower power consumption, and more space on the PCB is always a good thing.

    • adisor19
    • 3 years ago

    Now that Apple has moved away from Samsung to TSMC, this is Samsung’s next best thing. Won’t pay as much as Apple but at least it will keep those fabs churning.

    Also, I don’t belive Apple switched to TSMC for monetary reasons or to hurt Samsung. They switched as they saw some worthy advantage that only TSMC could provide.

    Adi

      • RdVi
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t think Apple pays anyone ‘much’. They’d have huge discounts because of quantities and their brand power. The iPhone has a very low BOM compared to the RRP.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah. Apple can haggle because they have the quantity advantage and wafer orders from Apple are almost sure to meet contractual agreements (unlike, say, wafer orders from AMD).

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    So obviously the Galaxy S8 will have a Snapdragon 835 then…

      • JalaleenRumi
      • 3 years ago

      Or better yet, Samsung’s own Processor….AND some variants with 835…maybe.

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        I thought they used Snapdragon in US phones and Exynos elsewhere. Maybe I’m wrong.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          Not sure how true [url=http://www.phonearena.com/news/Galaxy-S7-model-numbers-leak-see-which-carriers-are-getting-Snapdragon-820-or-Exynos-8890-models_id75848<]this rumor[/url<] wound up being. My Verizon S7 definitely has a Snapdragon 820, though.

          • juzz86
          • 3 years ago

          Correct. I think there’s a licensing thing with Qualcomm and CDMA in the US? I remember reading about something a while back which explained the insistence on Qualcomm in the US.

          All Australian models (and Asian grey imports) run Exynos. The last Snappy-powered Samsung flagships here were the Galaxy S5 and Note 4.

      • gmskking
      • 3 years ago

      It better have or I will not buy.

    • Redundant
    • 3 years ago

    Wish these weren’t inversely proportional to screen size

      • Lord.Blue
      • 3 years ago

      What kind of screen proportions are you expecting?

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