Rumor: Skylake Xeon E5-2699v5 may pack up to 32 cores per socket

While Intel's mainstream desktop CPUs have been stuck at four cores since the introduction of the Core 2 Quad in 2007, the core count in the silicon giant's Xeon server line of CPUs has continually increased. A Skylake-based Intel Xeon E5-2699v5 chip posted for sale at Chinese e-commerce site Taobao suggests the next round of Intel server CPUs will pack as many as 32 cores and 64 hardware threads into one socket. For comparison, the current top-of-the-line Xeon E5-2699v4 has 22 cores and 44 hardware threads.

The actual listing provides scant information about the CPU in question, but TechPowerUp reports that the chip uses Intel's new LGA 3647 socket. Owners of servers with LGA 2011v3 sockets can forget about a drop-in replacement. TPU also says the chip in question is an engineering sample with a base clock of 2.1GHz. The Intel Xeon E5-2699v5 chip has a listed price of 26,500¥, which converts to about $3,850.

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    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Poor Intel fans stuck at 4 cores. Look at us AMD fans. I’ve been on 8 cores since 2012. Come join us. We’ll make desktop computing great again.

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    I already posted about this in the forums. You’re welcome.

    • Pulsar_the_Spacenerd
    • 4 years ago

    $3,800? That’s actually pretty decent compared to past products.
    The 22 core Broadwell-EP is almost a thousand dollars more than that.

      • jts888
      • 4 years ago

      The optimist in me wants to believe that this is an indication that Intel at least thinks Naples might be competitive. I’m not sure how AMD will fare in perf/W, but you’d hope that doing the MCM thing would give them an advantage in yields vs. 32 core monolithic parts.

      • cmrcmk
      • 4 years ago

      The list for the 24-core E7-8890 is north of 7 grand (though that is a different market segment).

    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    You wanted moar coars?
    You got them!

    Incidentally, that pricetag is actually pretty reasonable. Almost suspiciously reasonable…

      • Neutronbeam
      • 4 years ago

      What’s the ballpark $ for the related mobo?

        • jts888
        • 4 years ago

        Probably not cheap if the LGA 3647 rumors are true.
        6 DIMM channels plus gobs of PCIe lanes are not easy to route, and I couldn’t even guess the number of copper layers that will be required.

          • chuckula
          • 4 years ago

          LGA 3647 isn’t a rumor. You can buy the motherboards right now and tens of thousands of them are in use right now in supercomputers on the top-500 list since LGA 3647 is also used for Knights Landing.

          The real interesting thing is how expensive Naples boards will have to be if any of the (still rumored) numbers about Naples are true.

          For example, you think 6 memory channels is big? Try 8 if Naples actually enables all the memory controllers on that 4-pack of 8-core Zen modules that make up the chip.

          PCIe? If the rumors are to be believed, there are 128 lanes, which frankly is so much that most motherboards probably won’t even connect most of those lanes to anything.

          As for the socket pin count, if we naively quadruple the 1331 pin AM4 motherboard for each of those dies, that’s 5,324 contacts, making LGA 3647 look small. However, since a bunch of those pins are ground pins and power delivery pins that might be provided to multiple dies, I expect the actual number of contacts in the server boards to be lower… but maybe not much lower than 3647.

            • jts888
            • 4 years ago

            Naples can’t reasonably be in the same thermal envelope as KL, and neither frankly can Skylake-E, so I wouldn’t expect either of them to have as many power/ground pins (and why I suspect the possibility of the new Skylake using less than 3.6k pins).

            My best guess for Naples is that we’ll see 2S configs with the front socket wired to dozens of NVMe u.2 connectors and the rear socket maybe only using a half or a third of its lanes. (Assuming that the PCIe PHYs don’t do double duty as MCM interconnect lanes.)

            But yeah, I think we might see different mobos (and chip SKUs) with 4 and 8 DDR4 channels per socket, since honestly not everyone will need ~150 GB/s per socket.

            • kalelovil
            • 4 years ago

            IF these specs are correct (32 Skylake-AVX512 cores at 2.1Ghz base clock), that’s a big jump from Broadwell-EP on a similar lithography.

            It wouldn’t suprise me if it reaches a comparable die size and TDP to Knights Landing (~680mm2 and 200W).

            Any AMD inroads into this market will depend on them achieving a similar performance/watt.

            • the
            • 4 years ago

            Intel hasn’t confirmed that SkyLake-EP and Knights Landing use the same socket. It would be very nice if they did but I feel like we will have another socket 2011, 2011-1 and 2011-3 situation.

            I also suspect that not all of Naples IO contacts will go to the socket in MCM packages. This could be useful if AMD did want to place something other than CPUs into the socket. The obvious answer is a GPU but things like FPGAs could make its way there if AMD were to partner up with another company.

            • chuckula
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]Intel hasn't confirmed that SkyLake-EP and Knights Landing use the same socket. [/quote<] They are. You can see LGA 3647 sockets being used with Purley Skylake Xeon parts right here: [url<]http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-xeon-skylake-purley-cpu,31980.html[/url<] That's not to say that a desktop-grade Skylake-E will use that socket, BTW since Intel is also making LGA 2066 with the more "normal" quad-memory channel setup for Skylake-E parts.

      • PBCrunch
      • 4 years ago

      Keep in mind that price is for a specific engineering sample chip. Go look on ebay at the price of current Xeon sample chips compared to their retail brothers.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      Nowhere as suspicious as $300 for 8C/16T Zen rumors.

    • WhatMeWorry
    • 4 years ago

    I remember when 32 bits on CPUs were a big deal. Never thought I’d live to see 32 cores.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 4 years ago

      By 90s console nomenclature, a system with this chip in would probably be deemed “2048-bit!!!”

        • techguy
        • 4 years ago

        16384 if you count max. AVX-512 instruction width 😀

          • jts888
          • 4 years ago

          I’d still accept that before ever being willing to call a SIMT ALU subunit a “core” with a straight face.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      Back in the early 90’s I had this big computer parts catalog from Taiwan and motherboards advertised support for up to 32MB of RAM. I was like, whoa!!

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