AMD investors will get their day in court over Llano APUs

The topic of AMD stock has made the news, though not necessarily in the best of ways. AMD stockholders have started a lawsuit against the company and a group of its executives over the demise of Llano APUs. The court allowed the complaint to proceed as a class action lawsuit.

The lawsuit claims that AMD leaders, including Rory Read and Lisa Su, made "false and misleading statements to investors about the manufacturing and subsequent launch of, as well as the demand for, its Llano microprocessor" back in 2011 and 2012. The plaintiffs allege that AMD and its management violated the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. A judge has decided that the claim has met the requirements to be considered as a class action lawsuit, though no further decisions have been made in the case.

The court indicates that anyone that purchased AMD stock between April 4, 2011 and October 18, 2012 is covered by the lawsuit. As usual, individuals that wish to pursue their own claims against AMD must ask to be excluded from the class-action suit.

We took a look at Llano back in 2011 and thought it promising. Its CPU cores didn't win any performance awards at the time, but the included Radeon IGP was suprisingly capable for an integrated solution, and heads-and-shoulder above Intel's solutions. All that graphical goodness apparently didn't translate into the expected sales figures, though.

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    • Arvald
    • 3 years ago

    I have an A6-3500.
    I use it in my Windows home server box that I use for media serving.
    It runs well, transcodes pretty much on the fly (tested using an Apple TV 2 with the redirecting of the Trailers app to a Plex server on the WHS box)
    At 65 Watt it hit my power requirements nicely.

    A 400 Watt power supply drives it and 6 hard drives with room to spare.

    I also built an A10 system which to this day a neighbour uses as their main PC (they wanted performance and cheap)

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]manufacturing and subsequent launch of, as well as the demand for,[/quote<] So does that mean that Llano was [i<]legally[/i<] overbudget, late, not promoted suitably and un(der)sold? IIRC investments are gambles so I'm curious what part of the failing to win a gamble is grounds for a lawsuit.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, that was my thought too. IANAL, but I think they would need to show that AMD management crossed a line from just being really optimistic, to intentionally lying. In other words, they would need to convince a jury that AMD knew ahead of time that it would be a flop, but pretended everything was OK just to keep the stock price up.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        That must be it because the alternative meaning can be summarised as “took a gamble and filed a lawsuit because we didn’t win”.

        In saying that, this is the US legal culture and the rest of the planet rightly jokes that the entire US economy consists of lawyers suing lawyers.

          • just brew it!
          • 3 years ago

          And the sad thing is, the joke is on us since — like most good jokes — there’s a kernel of truth to it.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Never really considered APUs worthwhile. You’re stuck with weak CPU cores that are not only weak compared to Intel, but are further hampered by heat because they share TDP headroom with graphics. In my experience the price wasn’t lower compared to a Core i3 + low end discrete graphics either (equivalent to an APU’s graphics capability). In the end, I had to go with Intel. There’s only one APU I’d consider for cheap, cheerful builds and that’s the A8-7600, but that’s only because it’s real cheap and my needs have changed over the years. Still, I imagine the Pentium can put up a good fight.

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    Llano was actually really good in laptops, probably a better CPU than the BD-bases successors… it was just conservatively clocked out of the box.

    My A8-3500M runs at 2.1Ghz (stock 1.5) [i<]with[/i<] a big undervolt, and the IGP outclassed the Intel IGPs at the time. On top of that, it idles at 400mhz (stock 800mhz) at a fraction of the stock voltage. I still use it, feels fine. Runs SVP + MadVR without a hitch.

      • EzioAs
      • 3 years ago

      Really, it can handle SVP and MadVR? At which presets/profile/settings , though? I remember my previous laptop with a core i5(dual-core with HT) couldn’t really handle the load and I adjust the settings way low too.

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        I use Lanzcos for luma scaling, hardware chroma scaling,
        and the usual debanding/deringing. So not very high settings, but perfectly passable.

        SVP can actually run with passable settings, as SVP scales across cores and it’s basically a 2.1ghz Phenom II quad with enough GPU for acceleration.

        EDIT: But to be honest I switched from MadVR to MPV some time ago, as it’s more efficient with SVP and I can get away with higher settings.

        Also, it’s a 1360×768 laptop, which makes rendering easier. 1080p Llano laptops didn’t exist 😛

          • YukaKun
          • 3 years ago

          “1080p Llano laptops didn’t exist”.

          Oh, yes they did. Not in the best shapes or most sexy forms, but they did. Still, they are unicorns and I won’t argue that 😛

          My GF still has hers from her University times; she used it for programming and still does. It’s the A8-3510MX with a 6670M or something like that. A full sized keyboard as well.

          The only problem with the laptop, was the added 67xx card. The CPU alone was enough to drive everything, including light gaming, but the extra card just added heat and battery drain.

          Quite the nice laptop still TBH. We use it as a “mobile HTPC” when I’m not carrying my own.

          It also has MPC with MadVR. I can’t recall the exact setting though.

          Cheers!

    • AlphaEdge
    • 3 years ago

    I had the original Llano that ran at 2.9 GHz (A8-3850), bought when released in 2011, and that was an awesome APU, which I used for about three years, before I upgraded to the A8-7600 in 2014. No games, just used these for business work.

    I don’t understand this lawsuit.

    Next upgrade will be late 2017, when the Zen based APU’s come out.

      • Meadows
      • 3 years ago

      This lawsuit is not about satisfaction with the product.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 years ago

      From the AMD Litigation site linked in the article, here is what the lawsuit claims. (I make no statements about whether or not it has merit or should win — just that this is what it’s about….)

      “… Lead Plaintiffs allege that Defendants made materially false and misleading statements to investors about the manufacturing and subsequent launch of, as well as the demand for, its Llano microprocessor between April 4, 2011 and October 18, 2012, allegedly in violation of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Lead Plaintiffs further allege that the false and misleading statements inflated the price of AMD’s common stock and that, when Defendants later disclosed the truth of the ongoing problems with Llano, AMD’s stock price dropped.”

      So TL;DR version is, people lost money on AMD stock and are blaming AMD executives for ” false and misleading statements” causing that loss.

      Again, I’m not saying a thing about who’s right (don’t shoot the messenger folks….)

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    What about those who purchased a LLano APU? (joking)

    I have an A6 3650 and was never really impressed with it. I could play GTA SA on it. Nothing newer worked well.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Diablo 3 ran “ok” (low details, 1366×768) on my wife’s A8-3850 at the time, but it wasn’t too long before we added a Radeon 7750 for it to run at the native resolution of the 1600×900. Her current i5-3570K and GTX 760 (which was my system up until last summer) run circles around that box now, though.

      As well they should. The 3570K cost as much as the CPU, mobo, and GPU in the old rig combined. 😆

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 years ago

        I think I paid $100 for the apu, cheap gigabyte board and 8 GB of RAM. It was still much cheaper than a quad core and discrete graphics for a part time htpc.

        The stock cooler was the loudest thing ever. I eventually down clocked the apu to 1.5 GHz to attempt to remedy the noise.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 3 years ago

        I’m actually typing this from the A8-3850 Llano + Asus [url=http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/F1A75M_PRO_R20/<]F1A75M Pro[/url<] system that I originally built as an HTPC. The family member to whom I gave it uses this system every day.

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