Thermaltake Tower 900 Series case gives “water tower” new meaning

Building any PC—especially a liquid-cooled system—is a bit of a science project. So why pretend it isn't? That seems to be the idea behind Thermaltake's new The Tower 900 Series chassis, the first modder-friendly case in the company's TT Premium line. Initially shown off back in May at Computex, The Tower 900 Series is now available for pre-order.

Built in collaboration with Watermod France, this chassis features a distinctive vertical main chamber surrounded on three sides by 5-mm thick tempered glass. The roomy enclosure makes room for extensive cooling hardware: it can accept 260-mm-tall CPU coolers, two 560-mm liquid-cooling radiators, or a dual-loop liquid-cooling design. The Tower can also handle one 5.25-inch drive, six 2.5- or 3.5-inch drives in its combo cages, and two 2.5-inch drives on dedicated sleds.

Thermaltake says the vertical-mounting design will help reduce graphics-card sag, especially on systems with multiple liquid-cooled graphics cards. The case can be fully dismantled, too, ensuring there aren't any corners that you simply can't reach whether you're working on a new build or doing regular maintenance.

The Tower 900 will be available on the TT Premium website in mid-December for $249 in both black and white editions, and it should also be widely available on sites like Amazon and Newegg starting in early January.

Comments closed
    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    It looks like one of those glass front bar fridges. Add a chilled shelf to keep some cold beer on, and I’m in. 😉

    • south side sammy
    • 3 years ago

    I usually don’t like new cases when they come out. too gaudy, too many lights, gull wing doors, etc. But this is one case I’d like to see Jay from jayztwocents do a build in.

      • TwoEars
      • 3 years ago

      Funny you should mention him, I was thinking the exact same thing.

    • Khali
    • 3 years ago

    So that’s where the popcorn machine that used to be down at the local movie theater ended up…

    • TwoEars
    • 3 years ago

    That’s… surprisingly stylish.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I want an enclosure where the innards are fully submerged in liquid. There must be a few non-conductive liquids out there, right?

    Edit – after some Google-Fu I see distilled water and a biocide could serve as a non-conductive liquid.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      You mean like [url=https://www.pugetsystems.com/submerged.php<]this?[/url<] Liquid cooling like that has been around for a while. It that popular. Several of the best nonconductive coolants are also corrosive to motherboard material and thus should be avoided.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      Most people don’t realize just how much liquid you need for a submersion build. With this case you’d need close to 100 liters of mineral oil to fill it. The entire volume works out to be about 150 liters, but I imagine only the glassed in area of the case would be sealed off and filled. Even still, you better hope you don’t have any leaks.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      It won’t stay pure and non-conductive for long. Atmospheric CO2 will dissolve in it, creating weak carbonic acid. The biocide is probably slightly conductive as well. Stuff will eventually dissolve or leach out of various components. You really don’t want to go there.

    • James296
    • 3 years ago

    this case screams for a mineral oil build.

    Edit: If I do a mineral oil build, I’ll use this case and call it Fish tank

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 3 years ago

      With fish stickers on the side.

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 3 years ago

    I’m sure some people will really like this. Looks well thought out.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      It’s definitely more convincing as a showcase than a lot of the open glass cases we’ve seen lately.

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