Adata A10050QC Power Bank delivers Quick Charge power

Google may not be a fan of the proprietary Quick Charge technology baked into Qualcomm's Snapdragon SoCs, but that doesn't mean other companies aren't on board. Adata's A10050QC Power Bank brings Quick Charge 3.0 compatibility and reversible USB-C connectors to mobile users unable to make it back to a plug in order to charge their ever-thinner mobile devices. The model number refers to the Power Bank's capacity: 10,050mAh carried in Panasonic battery cells. According to Adata's calculations, this is enough juice to charge four smartphones or one full-size tablet.

Adata claims the A10050QC can charge a typical QC-compatible phone from empty to an 80% charge in less than half an hour, with a maximum Quick Charge 3.0 output of 23W. The old-school USB Type-A connector on the device is limited to a peak output of 15W, and non-QC3.0 devices can draw up to 18W over the newfangled Type-C port. Charging the Power Bank itself takes place over a conventional Micro-USB port.

Perhaps an even better trick is the Power Bank's ability to charge the battery while topping off another device. The battery can be charged at a rate of 2.5A. Both outputs can be tapped simultaneously at a combined 4.6A. With this feature, the Power Bank could be used as a UPS of sorts for devices that rely on 5V input.

Adata thinks $45 is a fair price for the A10050QC. There's no exact availability information, but the company said Newegg and Amazon will carry blue and gray versions of the device.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    It’s clearly 6x 18650 with a bit of management circuitry, and you’d really hope that safety circuitry keeps the high amps behind some kind of intelligence; 4.6A is a lot of potential fireworks and trashed devices if you’re not careful with it, but I think it’s only the unbranded chinese stuff you have to really worry about.

    Part of me wonders how efficient the voltage step-up is from 3.7V to 5V, and how much of that rated battery capacity actually makes it at the typical 5V most things are.

      • Anton Kochubey
      • 3 years ago

      10 050 mAh sounds more like 3x 3350 mAh 18650’s.
      $45 is a bit too steep – I got Aukey 10 000 mAh powerbank with QC 3.0 for around half that price.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        You’re right, it is only 3 cells – obvious if you click the link.

        They’re panasonic cells and the 3350 ones aren’t rated to that for high C-values, so on fast charge this thing will deplete far quicker than you expect. There’s probably some teeny-tiny small print on the back of the packaging that explains that in the most underhanded, sneaky way though.

        At 6-cells it would be reasonable but I agree with you that it’s a bit pricey for three panasonics and a simple PCB. I own an Anker 6-cell beast and that was not much more than this, nor does it look to be much larger.

    • xeridea
    • 3 years ago

    I find it interesting that power banks have gained popularity in recent years due to phone batteries shrinking to accommodate thinner phones. Efficiency has gone up, but battery life goes down. I carry a small power bank on occasion if I forget to charge phone, but not a giant brick.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Power banks are the solution to everyone copying apple and making things too thin to put a battery in.

      I’m still waiting for my inch-thick Android smartphone that lasts a week.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      My Acer phone has a huge 5,000mAh battery. It’s a bit thicker but so what. Maybe more phones can be like it.

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      I think it’s also due the fact that numerous devices, not just thin, small battery phones, have become USB powered. You can power a lot of disparate devices with these batteries. It will be even better when they support the higher wattage allowed by USB Type C power delivery.

        • xeridea
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, nothing against the banks, they are great when you need them. I just find the popularity rise since thin phones is interesting. It would be more convenient for day to day if phones had bigger batteries so many wouldn’t be forced to carry these bricks around.

    • cygnus1
    • 3 years ago

    The first company that will sell a battery pack with dual USB C, that both support sending and receiving power, both compatible with USB PD (60W at least), and pass-thru charging, they’ll have my money. Not buying another one until that comes out. With that capability you can charge pretty much any USB device quickly and it will even be able to be emergency juice for newer ultrabook laptops like my Spectre x360 and the wife’s Macbook.

    Holy grail of portable chargers? Too much to ask?

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Trippy. That product photo of the ends makes my brain wanna combine the two like a ven diagram.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Same here. My eyes just start to cross.

    • llisandro
    • 3 years ago

    Nice, it was surprising how many of these suckers didn’t support pass-through charging when I was in the market.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Asus sells a 10,050mAh power bank for about $20. Whether or not the $45 Adata wants for this is justifiable depends on this device’s extra features’ importance to you. Not sure where Asus gets there cells from though. Probably from a sweat shop somewhere in Asia.

      • danazar
      • 3 years ago

      I would pay an extra $5 for a battery that offers pass-through charging.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Um, yeah but Adata is selling theirs for $45. That’s >double the price of an Asus power bank, don’t you think?

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I remember the 1995 movie Apollo 13 where this NASA guy tells Ken Mattingly, “You’re gonna lose a lot in the transfer, Ken.”

    I think this loss still applies today, more than 40 years after Apollo 13. Moving power from one battery to another is inefficient. In my experience you only get around 60-70% of what the label says.

      • danazar
      • 3 years ago

      It’s not the most efficient in terms of raw energy transfer, but it’s a lot more efficient in terms of access to power than carrying a 25 foot extension cord everywhere.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Of course. I was just pointing this out.

    • DoomGuy64
    • 3 years ago

    Seems like something I could use with a solar panel.

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