Panasonic develops an IPS panel with a million-to-one contrast ratio

Japanese technology industry giant Panasonic has developed a new type of IPS LCD panel that the company says is capable of a contrast ratio in excess of a million to one. That's 1,000,000:1, to be clear, and that's a static contrast measurement, too, unlike the often fudged "dynamic contrast" figures. Assuming that Panasonic delivers on its word, that would mean these new panels are among the highest-contrast displays we usually see.

Contrast ratio, for those unfamiliar, is a measurement of the brightness value of the brightest versus darkest parts of a monitor. Companies frequently quote "dynamic" contrast ratios in excess of one million for their displays. Those abnormally high numbers are achieved by changing the monitor backlight's output level—or completely turning it off, in the case of "infinite" contrast.

By contrast (ahem), a monitor's static contrast ratio is the measurement that's actually useful, that is, the difference measured between the brightest white and darkest black the monitor can display at a fixed backlight setting. The very best TN and IPS LCDs have a static contrast ratio around 1200:1. Monitors using VA LCD panels can achieve much better contrast, up to around 5000:1. All of these measurements pale in comparison to the numbers Panasonic is bandying about for its new displays, though.

Panasonic says that to achieve such a ludicrous contrast ratio, its new panels utilize "newly-developed light-modulating cells." The new cells are made of liquid crystals, just like those in the color-modulating display cell. By applying these light-modulating cells behind the traditional IPS display cell, the monitor can control light transmission on a per-pixel basis. Panasonic says the new technology has no inter-pixel light leakage, too.

Of course, blocking light only gets you halfway to a good contrast ratio. Panasonic says the backlights it's using in the new displays can continuously shine at up to 1,000 cd/m². That's far too bright for normal use, but the company says the new panels are directly targeted at industrial and commercial applications. Brightness that high should make these new displays clearly legible even in direct sunlight.

It's difficult to blame Panasonic for going after the high-margin special-purpose market, but we hope these displays hit the mainstream market sooner rather than later. This technology will almost certainly make for displays that are more expensive than run-of-the-mill LCDs, but its stellar contrast sounds ideal for reproducing HDR content, and it's possible they'll still ring in for less than still-exotic OLED displays.

We obviously haven't seen one of the new displays in person yet, but we might not have to wait all that long. Panasonic says the new displays can be produced on existing manufacturing equipment, and that it will be shipping samples in January of next year. Hopefully we'll get to see one at the Consumer Electronics Show. Hat tip to Anandtech for the news.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    That’s cool and all, but looks complicated and expensive, as well as potentially introducing some processing lag, just as there always is with screens that employ local backlight dimming.

    If the benefit of a variable monochrome LCD shade is that it darkens the glow and backlight leakage without affecting the maximium brightness, then can’t we get a cheaper fixed version that [i<]does[/i<] affect the maximum brightness instead? I mean, 1,000 cd/m²?!! I'd rather have a low-cost, lag-free, simple filter that reduces the light output by 75%. That would reduce the black levels to 1/4 what the would otherwise be, making it comparable to the epic black levels of VA panels, whilst simultaneously dropping the brightness to 250 cd/m² which is still a bit too bright but much closer to a realistic value.

    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    Be nice if all panel makers offered an A-TW polarizer on their monitors.

    “Some IPS panels in high end displays are coupled with an Advanced True Wide (A-TW) polarizer which helps improve blacks from wide viewing angles, and reduces some of the pale glow you can normally see. ”

    [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/content/panel_technologies_content.htm#h-ips[/url<] old technology, too bad didn't see it more often.

    • adisor19
    • 3 years ago

    If it’s not too power hungry, I expect this in a future Apple laptop, that is assuming Apple will still make laptops at that time.

    Adi

    • sreams
    • 3 years ago

    What are my chances?
    Not good.
    You mean, not good like one out of a hundred?
    I’d say more like one out of a million.
    So you’re telling me there’s a chance. YEAH!

    • Wonders
    • 3 years ago

    Love the writing in this article! It is smooth, clear, and precise. Great voice coming through.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Thanks very much for your compliments.

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      I just looked at the pretty pictures and immediately skipped to the comment section

    • Mikael33
    • 3 years ago

    Not sure if I’m still spoiled by using CRTs years ago but I’m disappointed in the black level of my BenQ 3200pt, with a calibrated contrast ratio of around 3000 according to tft central. The bright scenes in movies and TV shows look fantastic but the blacks still aren’t dark enough at night. I think the bezel being dark black really accentuates that.

    • TwoEars
    • 3 years ago

    This is big. Could make IPS a valid option to oled in the future. Let the games begin.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Still miss the true “blacks” on CRTS and Plasma displays. LCDs simply cannot match them. You can clearly this with proper source material.

      • Mr Bill
      • 3 years ago

      I’m pretty pleased with my 24″ Asus PA248Q IPS. I have the angel nebula on it as a background and the blacks look pretty good.

      • rechicero
      • 3 years ago

      I have a “good” plasma TV (Panasonic) and never had “true blacks”. For some reason, just some brightness means the cells are always on.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        That’s most likely the signal being fed to it and the brightness settings on the TV itself.

        One of the biggest culprits for this sin is “Limited-range RGB” where broadcasts are sent with 16-235 instead of 0-255 bits per colour channel. It means that your TV was asked to produce 16,16,16 (dark grey) as black instead of 0,0,0.

          • rechicero
          • 3 years ago

          I dont’ think so. I’ve used calibrating media and used both 16-235 and 0-235 (clearly different with the typical schemes to calibrate media… and I mean media sent from the PC and BluRays like Spears & Munsil and DVE. It shouldn’t be the quality of the media and, as I told you, the color range doesn’t change this effect. The only thing that makes the blacks darker is the brightness setting… but you need some brightness. Even with some brightness (meaning, not real blacks), you end up clipping the black level and losing several levels (there is nothing wrong in losing the first 16, they are not supposed to be there, but when you are losing the 30s… that’s not acceptable).

          Either the real blacks of the tech is not so real, or the circuits can’t manage them. Anyway, they are not there (and I insist, with a really good Plasma TV)

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            So it’s terrible circuits/firmware in the TV then; If you can get true blacks by decreasing the brightness setting yet you run into clipping, that’s just a firmware or design fault of the television and not a problem of plasma tech as a whole. There’s sound logic behind it too: Plasma technology is “off” unless current is applied. The current excites the plasma which emits UV to excite the phosphors in front of each plasma cell. Think of each pixel of a plasma panel as a miniature cathode ray tube and phosphor screen. No current, no emission – it’s that simple.

            The only plasma I have access to now is a decade-old 50″ NEC but it is very much black in a pitch black room. It would be invisible were it not for the status LED.

            Just like with a poorly-regulated, or badly-adjusted CRT monitor that shows black as a grey, a plasma screen can suffer from the same faults.

            The same actual issue always seems to get in the way of sensible discussions about TN/IPS/VA technology as people always use their often single experience from one monitor to sweepingly generalise all other monitors with the same tech as alike. However, there are good and bad TN panels, good and bad IPS panels, and good and bad VA panels. As always, the theoretical limits of the technologies are rarely reached as most companies will prefer to cut corners for lower costs/higher profits. In general, most TN monitors are too cheap and if you picked ten TN panels at random from the market, eight or nine of them would be dire. IPS and VA panels are generally better because manufacturers scraping the bottom of the barrel for lowest-possible production cost don’t touch them – needless to say that cheap IPS and VA monitors are still ruined by uneven backlights and poor design and assembly that causes backlight bleed where the panel gets crimped, bent, mishandled etc.

          • rechicero
          • 3 years ago

          Ok, after your post I checked a bit and I can confirm “black” levels in plasma are not so black. IF we take 12Gen from Panasonic, the panel started with 0,03 Cd/m2 (not so black, but good), and change after a few hundred days of use to 0,06 to finally settle in 0,12. [url=http://panasonic.mironto.sk/<]AS you can see here[/url<]. It's funny because these "true blacks" are actually brighter than blacks from modern quality LED TVs, even at it's best (According to rtings, Vizio P Series has 0,018, Samsung KS8000 0,016 and Sony X800 0,026). So much for the true blacks... The good thing is it looks like I can make them like a modern mid-range LED TV again.

            • meerkt
            • 3 years ago

            I’m not sure you can compare measurements from different people. Don’t know if it’s due to using different gear or what, but you see different results.

            Panasonic ST60 (unknown size) gets here 0.011 cd/m^2:
            [url<]http://ca.rtings.com/tv/reviews/panasonic/st60[/url<] 0.005-0.007 cd/m^2 here (42"): [url<]http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/panasonic-tx-p42st60-201303312779.htm[/url<]

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 3 years ago

            You were correct earlier. Plasma technology is perfectly capable of producing real black. I’ll leave the details, but I spent a fair amount of time finding a true black projector for a research lab to replace their CRT projector with. LCD isn’t black. DLP had shimmering. Plasma can be black if you get the appropriate model.

            Long story short, most plasma models started keeping low levels of current in the cells to improve response time and lower power consumption. The level selected depends on manufacturer response time and power targets, but it can be changed in firmware. It is much more efficient to drive an already active cell to a different brightness than to drive the necessary current to turn the cell on and then adjust to the brightness you need. This small change was apparently the dominating factor in reducing the power consumption of plasma TVs by about half.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      In a pitch black room, yes – CRT and plasma were black.

      In a lit room – even a dimly lit room – the surface of most CRT’s and plasmas was grey and that was as black as they could ever go.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, hopefully OLED will prompt reviews to switch to measuring contrast until lit conditions rather than in total darkness so it’s a more accurate reflection of how most of us use our monitors and TVs.

        • GrimDanfango
        • 3 years ago

        So you’re saying what we really need is not just OLED, but OLED overlaid on a backing of Vantablack?

      • Mr Bill
      • 3 years ago

      Never mind. Static contrast beats dynamic contrast.
      [url<]https://www.asus.com/us/Monitors/PA248Q/[/url<]

    • TheJack
    • 3 years ago

    Nice!
    Make a reflective display and that would be impressive.
    It’ about time too.

    • Redundant
    • 3 years ago

    These new monitors already have me wearing sunglasses and tapping my foot to Corey Hart. Guess with this one a welding helmet is required.

    • cynan
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]It's difficult to blame Panasonic for going after the high-margin special-purpose market, but we hope these displays hit the mainstream market sooner rather than later. [/quote<] Fat chance of that. And I thought this might actually mean that Panasonic LCD TVs might actually soon contain Panasonic panels...

    • GrimDanfango
    • 3 years ago

    Huh, well I didn’t see this coming. I wonder if it in any way alleviates the “IPS-glow” effect while it’s at it.

    If so, this might be worth picking up as a stop-gap while I wait another 10-20 years for a decent affordable OLED monitor with G-Sync.

    Edit: The 1000 cd/m² is far too bright for regular dynamic-range use, but along with that contrast ratio, it would probably make for a fine HDR display overall.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      I give G-Sync less than 3 years before it no longer exists.

        • GrimDanfango
        • 3 years ago

        Well, if it does indeed die out, then I’ll gladly take the open standard instead. For the time being, nVidia have backed themselves into a bit of a corner… they can’t even optionally support the open standard as it would collapse their entire G-Sync ecosystem overnight. If the G-Sync business does indeed bottom-out, only then will they make the leap.
        Until that day, and so long as I prefer to stick with nVidia cards, my only adaptive refresh option is G-Sync. At least for now it offers a couple of minor advantages.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 3 years ago

          FreeSync offers a couple of tangible advantages over G-Sync: Two additional Benjamins in your wallet. LOL.

            • tanker27
            • 3 years ago

            I’ll give you that, the premium for G-sync is deep.

        • tanker27
        • 3 years ago

        And your reasons are………………….

          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 years ago

          I presume the $200 premium for an otherwise identical monitor.
          I like G-Sync, but at the same time, I certainly won’t be sad to see it gone in favour of a far cheaper open standard.

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            also, [url=https://techreport.com/news/28865/intel-plans-to-support-vesa-adaptive-sync-displays<]Intel intends to support VESA Adaptive-Sync displays[/url<]

            • Airmantharp
            • 3 years ago

            Article from August 2015, mentions ‘after Skylake’; do we know if Kaby Lake is going to support the VESA extension?

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            “I confirmed we’re not getting any kind of FreeSync or VESA Adaptive-Sync support with this generation of chips, either.”

            [url<]https://techreport.com/review/30587/intel-kaby-lake-cpus-revealed[/url<] maybe coffee lake? who knows. I wonder whether they have to tread extra carefully here to avoid lawsuits from nvidia

            • Airmantharp
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah I dunno. The implementation seems fairly trivial from hardware standpoint, so either Intel has planned their product line so far ahead that changes were impractical, or you might be right.

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            Intel didn’t update their display controller with Kaby Lake since it was mainly a respin of Sky Lake fixing some early errata and getting a few hundred more Mhz within the same power envelope. This was also the first ‘optimize’ step in Intel’s new Process-Architecture-Optimize model replacing the nearly decade old tick-tock cadence. I really don’t think Intel had major plans for Kaby Lake since it was kinda rushed to market to fill a hole in their roadmap for 2017.

            Similarly, DisplayPort 1.3 wasn’t included with Kaby Lake though Intel has indicated that it will be coming in Cannon Lake. That is where I’d expect variable refresh support to be included.

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            let’s hope so!

            • K-L-Waster
            • 3 years ago

            I’ll be honest, I have a hard time seeing Intel supporting Freesync making much difference one way or the other. The only real advantage of adaptive sync is smoothing out gaming — how many people are there who a) care about smooth gaming but b) rely on Intel IGP instead of getting a discrete card?

            I’m sure those people exist, but I can’t imagine there are enough of them to make much difference in monitor sales.

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          Do you think AMD is gaining market share in the dGPU market just from their lower Perf/Watt and equal Perf/$ compared to Nvidia?

      • meerkt
      • 3 years ago
        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago
          • meerkt
          • 3 years ago

          Not sure how it was voted on because these empty messages seem unopenable.

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            It’s a secret!

            • meerkt
            • 3 years ago

            On my browser I don’t see a way other than changing the HTML to make the click target accessible. But an ever greater puzzle is why all the clicks of approval on this sub-thread.

            • Firestarter
            • 3 years ago

            Tip: You can use the A/Z keys to walk threads.

            • meerkt
            • 3 years ago

            Aha! Now I can finally vote with ease on all them empty messages!
            I guess you wouldn’t want my custom-CSS. 🙁

      • oldog
      • 3 years ago

      I’m interested to know why you think OLED would be a great gaming monitor. I have an LG OLED TV and it looks incredible with true 4k TV source material (Grand Tour anyone?).

      OTOH Xbone games look pretty lousy and seem sluggish v. my old LCD TV.

        • Airmantharp
        • 3 years ago

        ‘Lousy’ and ‘Sluggish’ are associated with the television that the panel is used in, not the panel itself. I.e., there’s processing going on that is molesting the signal from the Xbone and probably adding some input lag too.

        An OLED monitor (hopefully!) will not be saddled with such issues.

        • meerkt
        • 3 years ago

        Same reasons you like it for movies. Real blacks, no picture degradation due to viewing angles, and no artifacts due to slow pixel response times or overdrive overshoot.

        If by sluggish you mean high input lag, try to:
        * Enable “game mode” if it exists.
        * Upgrade firmware.
        * Use 4:2:0 color instead of 4:4:4.
        * Disable all picture processing options.

        There’s helpful information on lag in the various OLED TV reviews here:
        [url<]http://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg[/url<] What's "lousy"?

          • oldog
          • 3 years ago

          Lousy was admittedly a poor choice of words. By lousy I meant that I had hoped that gaming would look similar in sharpness to my old LCD TV. This does not seem to be the case.

          There are likely several reasons for this, possibly related to my set up and general stupidity in these matters. But it is not a given in my mind that an OLED screen in and of itself is the holy grail of monitors.

          I just found it more pleasant to go back to gaming on my PC and to watch high quality movies and TV on the LG.

            • GrimDanfango
            • 3 years ago

            Any TV is only as good as the media you feed it with, and the higher quality the screen, the more its going to show up the flaws of an imperfect input. Consoles typically run at nudged-down resolutions and with a lot of visual corners cut to maintain a consistent framerate on a box that only costs a few hundred dollars… I’m not surprised it doesn’t do an OLED screen justice.

            • oldog
            • 3 years ago

            Well yes and no. Yes high quality source material looks absolutely fabulous on the set. But in general the LG does a much better job getting a “good” picture with a mediocre feed. This was the major reason I upgraded to this TV. I was very disappointed by the way LCD sets looked with poor source material.

            The LG is hands down better in this regard and reminds me of my belated Pany plasma.

    • Shinare
    • 3 years ago

    Well, with 65 “+ TV’s falling below the $999 mark, they have to figure out another way to charge $1,500-2000+ for next year’s model.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      OLED

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        But LCDs have healthier margins.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      They already have that in the bag… “HDR”

      It’s a great tech advance that really needs to happen at the high end of things, but that won’t stop them reeling out a mass of half-baked budget crap with HDR as the latest gimmick to attempt to shift yet another wave of almost-the-same old rubbish.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] the company says the new panels are directly targeted at industrial and commercial applications.[/quote<] Yeah...don't get your hopes up for a usable gaming monitor featuring this tech anytime soon.

    • VinnyC
    • 3 years ago

    I recently replaced my aging TN panels with IPS. I must say, while they do have some benefits, the lack of an adequate black level was immediately noticeable. Hopefully this will lead to some consumer grade IPS with better blacks as well.

      • Froz
      • 3 years ago

      You say that TN has better blacks than IPS? This surprises me. I have TN in my laptop and it doesn’t do blacks at all. My IPS monitor is way better in every aspect, including blacks (but I also admit it was more expensive than the whole laptop – still, I was under impression that TN panels were in general similar to what I have).

        • MrDweezil
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, I haven’t used any TN panels that did a half decent black. I admit I haven’t used that many though.

          • BurntMyBacon
          • 3 years ago

          They do exist. Most of the monitor models that use TN use it as a way to cut cost and therefore use cheap panels with loose tolerances and drive them with cheap circuitry. If you want a good example of what TN can do, you’ll want to find a pricier model that doesn’t cut as many corners. In today’s market, that would be the high refresh rate “SYNC” capable monitors. That all said, I still prefer IPS for other reasons, but it certainly isn’t a magic bullet.

      • BillyBuerger
      • 3 years ago

      Are you sure the better blacks on your old TN panels was due to TN versus IPS and not other parameters? Could be other factors at play. I’ve never heard of black levels being something that’s inherently different between TN and IPS.

        • juzz86
        • 3 years ago

        Blacks on IPS panels do glow – it’s inherent to the way the planes switch in the panel, and it’s not as effective at blocking the backlight as TN and, to a much larger extent, VA. Local dimming in backlights helps a lot (especially at corners), but it is still evident – provided you switch between panel techs a bit.

        If IPS and ‘crappy’ TN (which accounts for about 99% of them, laptops included) or older CCFL-lit TN is all you’ve used, you’d be forgiven for thinking Vinny was wrong. However if you line the techs up alongside each other, a ‘good’ WLED-lit TN panel does do blacks more deeply than a WLED-lit IPS (and absolutely trounches a CCFL-lit IPS), while getting a handy serve from both CCFL- and WLED-lit VA.

        LED-lit IPS is a great all-rounder for the vast majority. Colours are beautiful, group viewing is better and they’re now on-par price-wise with everything else.

        * Anecdotally, I’ve just replaced a (calibrated) HP WLED-lit IPS on my desk with a (calibrated) TN ROG Swift and I am much happier with the blacks myself. You DO need a good panel to see the difference, though.

          • VinnyC
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, my TN panels were WLED lit. The blacks on them are significantly better than my IPS monitors. It was a bit of a disappointment honestly.

            • juzz86
            • 3 years ago

            It would not be a lie to say that IPS is quite over-dramatised and misunderstood from a general PC enthusiast point-of-view.

            If you want a monitor for lovely poppy colours that can be very accurate with a bit of fiddling – go right ahead.

            If you’re after deeper blacks (so, chasing the contrast ratio) and quicker response above about 60Hz though, you generally need to look elsewhere.

            TN: Quickest response, better blacks, worst angles, fair colours*
            VA: Slowest response, best blacks, better angles, good colours*
            IPS: Slower response, fair blacks, best angles, good colours*

            * Assumes out-of-box, no calibration

            • Sabresiberian
            • 3 years ago

            I think you are using “VA” in the original sense, which I believe is “MVA” in today’s panels, so your advice looks good to me. But for those not aware AU Optonic’s answer to IPS is “AHVA” and isn’t the same beast, but really IPS with a slightly different technique. Similar to Samsung’s PLS in that regard.

            [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/panel_technologies.htm[/url<] As far as "response time" the commonly reported G2G times are only part of the picture, and will not explain the actual lag you might notice in the monitor. A good explanation and comparative results can be found in this article: [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/asus_rog_swift_pg279q.htm[/url<] If you look at the "Average Lag Comparison" chart in the above article you will see the ROG Swift PG279Q (AHVA) actually beat out the rest of the monitors tested at the time, including the ROG Swift PG278Q (TN). Comparing panel types give you a general idea but specific monitors may be better or worse than their general panel type. A TN monitor might be better than some IPS monitors, or vice versa in uncalibrated color or black level. As in the example in the above article an IPS-type monitor might have a better lag time than most TN monitors. Not everything is about the panel, the controlling circuitry matters and can have a significant effect on how the display performs.

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 3 years ago

            [quote=”juzz86″<]It would not be a lie to say that IPS is quite over-dramatised and misunderstood from a general PC enthusiast point-of-view.[/quote<] Very true. Many don't know enough about it to know which panel would work best for them. [quote="juzz86"<]TN: Quickest response, better blacks, worst angles, fair colours* VA: Slowest response, best blacks, better angles, good colours* IPS: Slower response, fair blacks, best angles, good colours*[/quote<] This is a good summary, though I would point out a few things: VA in this summary refers to MVA/PVA and variants. IPS in this summary refers to IPS, PLS, and AHVA (tricky AU Optronics). Second, best blacks in this summary is corollary to highest contrast ratios, which is considered by many to be the single most important aspect of a display. TN was traditionally very poor in black depth, but eventually improved such that they have better black depth, but only slightly better contrast than IPS. The third thing I would like to remark on is color shift, which is related, but not the same as viewing angle. IPS will remain consistent while washing out at extreme angles. TN has worse viewing angles than VA, but less color shifting. VA, while viewable from decent angles, suffers color shifting from minor offset angles. TFT Central calls this off-centre contrast shift. [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/panel_technologies.htm[/url<] I'd also like to note that IPS is now getting much closer on average to TN for response time than VA is to IPS. Some models even display a maximum response time less than the 6.94ms period defined by a 144Hz refresh rate. Note the response time section in the following articles. (I've selected high refresh G-SYNC capable monitors to represent TN, IPS, and VA respectively.) Asus PG278Q (TN) [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/asus_rog_swift_pg278q.htm[/url<] Asus PG279Q (IPS) [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/asus_rog_swift_pg279q.htm[/url<] Acer Predator Z271 (VA) - This model gives me hope for the future of VA. [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/acer_predator_z271.htm[/url<] While I am a stickler for black levels and IPS provides a less than stellar performance here, I'm even more sensitive to color shifting. My requirement is simply that I must be able to look at the screen and not see a shift in color from edge to edge from my normal viewing position. Everything beyond that can be traded off. Lagom provides a nice easy way to find issues with viewing angle. With a properly calibrated monitor (gamma calibration is hugely important here) and running at native resolution, if I don't move, I should not be able to see red or cyan in the lettering on their viewing angle page. Unfortunately, I've never found a TN monitor larger than ~24" capable of this feat. My decision to go IPS for my personal monitors was a result of the combination of my want of a higher resolution (hence larger) display, no color shift from my normal viewing position, good enough speed, and (blacks aside) good color accuracy. It certainly isn't perfect, but it will suffice for the next decade. [url<]http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/viewing_angle.php#angleGrey[/url<]

          • BillyBuerger
          • 3 years ago

          Thanks for the info. I guess I didn’t pay enough attention to the details and just got stuck in IPS = good, TN = bad. And I’ve seen too many bad TN ones that reinforce that.

            • juzz86
            • 3 years ago

            No doubt mate – there’s plenty of them around 🙂

            Happy to help!

      • jessterman21
      • 3 years ago

      This is why I went VA – contrast is more important than extremely accurate colors to me

        • mnemonick
        • 3 years ago

        A really good VA panel can rival an IPS for color accuracy as well. I still have my old VX2025wm kicking around and I’d stack it up against the Dell I’m typing this on. 🙂

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    so they essentially added a second monochrome panel (probably TN) to multiply the maximum achievable contrast? Pretty clever

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      This is basically what I’m thinking they did as well.

      My two concerns over this tech is what is the response time of these cells that can block such a powerful backlight (is this thing going to be terrible for gaming?) and also what is the power consumption we can expect driving a much brighter backlight and blinking two panels worth of cells (is it going to be space heater)?

      • Hattig
      • 3 years ago

      Sounds like it. So there’s a 1000 nit backlight, always on, and a brightness controlling filter, and then fine grained RGB filters on top.

      I hope they’ve done a lot of work on the efficiency of that backlight.

        • cygnus1
        • 3 years ago

        Ideally the super bright backlight is locally dimmable. Then they only need to use the brightness filter to filter that locally bright backlight for the darker pixels in the brightened area surrounding bright pixels.

        My gut says this is going to be slow, and probably expensive to boot. I doubt we’ll see higher than 60hz displays with this tech any time soon.

      • donkeycrock
      • 3 years ago

      Just think what they could achieve if they used a double ips panel. ;p

        • eofpi
        • 3 years ago

        Double glow?

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    Crysis?

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    Kinda odd that they were not showing it off at RSNA. Granted EIZO bought a good chunk of Panasonics medical business but this display technology would align perfectly with that maket. Insane brightness and contrast are desirable traits for that very niche use-case.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Right on. They actually specifically mention the medical market in the press release.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    “It’s a million-to-one, Jerry! A million to one!”

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      So, this panel would be the Master of its Domain?

      • vargis14
      • 3 years ago

      LOL I want…

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      But the chances of anything coming from [s<]mars[/s<] this, is a million to one.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      SO YOU’RE SAYING THERE’S A CHANCE.

        • Mr Bill
        • 3 years ago

        A SMALL chance.

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