Cherry silences the typing storm with Silent MX keyswitches

If you use a mechanical keyboard around other people, chances are you've gotten at least one complaint about the noise. If folks around you can't bear the tak-tak-takking of your flitting fingers, keep an eye out for keyboards using Cherry's Silent MX keyswitches. Formerly exclusive to Corsair's Strafe RGB keyboard, the switches are now openly available stateside in Black and Red varieties. They're also available with clear switch housings for LED-backlit keyboards.

Boards using Cherry MX keyswitches make up the majority of the mechanical keyboard market these days. There are several solutions for muting the cacophony that heavy-handed typists produce on an MX-equipped keyboard, like using shock-dampening rubber O-rings around the keystems. Cherry says its new silence solution is patent-pending and doesn't interfere with keystroke feel. Keep your eyes peeled for new finger-exercisers featuring the silent switches.

Comments closed
    • hechacker1
    • 3 years ago

    Wait, I thought reds didn’t have any audible click to begin with? I have both a red keyboard at home, and a brown at work.

    The reds only makes sound if you bottom them out. The browns are definitely clicky and loud, but I don’t care about my coworkers. How are these different?

      • Wall Street
      • 3 years ago

      These are dampened so they don’t make a sound when you bottom out or when you release the key and it reaches the top of the return stroke.

    • hasseb64
    • 3 years ago

    First there were IBM, keyboards held for ages, but people hated the noise and the resistance in the keystrokes. Then the domes came, people loved them, everything was fine until someone reinvented the IBM board again. I say that 80% people only follows others.

      • VincentHanna
      • 3 years ago

      If you aren’t an inventor, and a producer of everything you have, then yes, by definition, you must be a follower. Saying so doesn’t make you smarter than the next guy doing the following, nor does pretending to be counter culture while sipping non-starbucks imported coffee in tight jeans while wearing an anti-GMO shirt “ironically”. Sorry.

        • garbagedisposal
        • 3 years ago

        That’s not the type of following he’s talking about. You have a lot of problems.

    • mkk
    • 3 years ago

    As a Strafe RGB Silent user I’m eager to try some no-frills keyboard with these switches. I cant stand the noise of regular Cherry MX of any kind, but find the “silent” bearable. I dont need the lighting though and my Strafe keyboard has some intermittent problems that might be firmware related, but occurs too rarely to be easy to RMA.

    Now I hope for some manufacturer to pick these switches up for some product without Christmas lighting built in. A sturdy, simple keyboard that just works please.

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    Aw damn it, there goes my ASMR buzz..

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Loud and proud.

    I want everyone in a 100-foot radius to know that I’m typing faster than them, and on a higher quality input device.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 years ago

      My friend calls it “machine gunning.”

      • AMD64Blondie
      • 3 years ago

      I feel the same way,typing on my classic 1991 IBM Model M.

    • BillyBuerger
    • 3 years ago

    Alps had dampened switches many years ago. Matias QuietClicks continue this. These Cherry switches are basically the same design. So the “patent-pending” thing sounds like marketing crap. Not that they couldn’t get a patent for it but not because it’s something new.

    And if someone is looking for a different way to silence your MX switches, ZealPC.net has their new Zealencio clips that mount on Cherry and most other MX style switches that give similar results. So you can still have your tactile switch of choice without all the clack.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      I think Cherry is talking about its specific method of silencing the switches, not the idea of a silent mechanical switch.

        • BillyBuerger
        • 3 years ago

        Sure, you could say the way they incorporate the dampening material into the switch is different. But they are still putting a soft material into the stem which is what the other dampened switches do. So it’s not a new idea.

        I’m not saying it’s not a good idea for Cherry to do this. I’m glad their finally doing something like this. And if they were available in something other than a Corsair board, I might have bought some switches when they first came out. But I’m not a fan of linear switches and there are other options that now exist.

      • VincentHanna
      • 3 years ago

      Patent pending is legal BS, not marketing BS.

        • BillyBuerger
        • 3 years ago

        True that. But then is used for marketing purposes. We’ve got a patent (or patent-pending) so that means it’s better.

    • Airmantharp
    • 3 years ago

    Where my Browns at?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      With the bump, it may not be possible. Mine seems to make a bit of noise at the actuation point.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 3 years ago

        I’ve installed [url=https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FNJQGQO/<]o-rings[/url<] to dampen the clatter of my MX Brown keycaps. The sound of the keys hitting the top of their travel after I release them is still significantly louder than the sound of the keyswitches activating.

          • Airmantharp
          • 3 years ago

          Yup.

          If they were willing to dampen both ends of the key travel, they could make Browns *really* quiet.

          Are you listening Cherry?

    • DancinJack
    • 3 years ago

    Blues or bust. Love that click’clackin’.

      • JosiahBradley
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah I went with blue-type switches for the added annoyance/awesome factor. People can hear me when I use my headset too, it’s so fun.

      • Ethyriel
      • 3 years ago

      Have you tried clears? I love the resistance and the hard bump, without the click.

        • DancinJack
        • 3 years ago

        I have typed on them for like, two minutes. I like the click though!

        I have some Greens and Blues, but Greens are a BIT tough to type on 24/7.

          • Ethyriel
          • 3 years ago

          Clears have by far my favorite stroke, but they are a little heavy. The bump on browns just isn’t strong enough, and I don’t like the suddenness of blues. I might have to try spring replacement one of these days to lighten clears up.

            • DancinJack
            • 3 years ago

            I agree about the browns. Just too light for my taste though, too. YAY BLUES. right in the middle. love ’em.

          • CScottG
          • 3 years ago

          Me too.. but the Blues could be a bit less noisy – but only so long as they have the SAME tactile feel.

          Browns just don’t do the same thing.

          Never tried Greens, but I tend to like the slighter greater resistance of the Chinese Blues (..that however might be a “new” thing, quality control between switches and resistance over time might well change more for the Chinese variants).

            • DancinJack
            • 3 years ago

            You might try some greens if you get a chance. They’re definitely heavier than the blues, but otherwise feel mostly the same. I like them, but I type a little bit slower with them compared to blues so I only use them if I need a second keyboard for something.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Agreed. Blues with the thinner o-rings (for minimal travel reduction) are pretty much my ideal switch to type on.

    • Waco
    • 3 years ago

    Keystroke feel…on red and black switches? They’re already numb. 😛

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      but it’s a different kind of numb compared to ye ‘ol rubber dome keyboards

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      I like my Reds. Use them for gaming and for typing, plenty of feedback and nice, smooth actuation.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        Feedback? What feedback?

        There’s absolutely no change in sensation to tell you when the key registers.

          • DancinJack
          • 3 years ago

          Exactly. I guess if you want to bottom out every single key then that’s good for Reds?

          • Voldenuit
          • 3 years ago

          Well the reds and the blacks have a short actuation distance, so the feedback is pretty much when the key starts to give (there is a small deadzone).

            • Chuckaluphagus
            • 3 years ago

            This, exactly. I use blacks, and I barely need to brush my fingers onto a key for it to actuate. I don’t need a loud click, and I couldn’t stand the “bump” feel of blues the one time I used a keyboard with them for a few days.

            • CScottG
            • 3 years ago

            It’s funny, I have an altogether different reaction with linear switches – I’ll sometimes not press hard enough to get the ky, or more often: get multiple inputs with that keeey.

            I can understand linear switches for multiple presses, as in SPAMING a weapon’s fire-rate during a game or moving more quickly in combat. But for anything else I find it nearly unusable.

            • EndlessWaves
            • 3 years ago

            The same here. In all the time I owned an MX linear keyboard I never managed to reliably hit the keys just the right amount to both get it to register and avoid bottoming out.

            If you only want to brush the keys lightly then why not go for scissor switches? They’re much cheaper.

            • sleeprae
            • 3 years ago

            Different strokes. I purchased and used–for months–keyboards based on MX blues, MX browns, MX reds, and MX blacks. I even have a Topre keyboard in the corner. I don’t game, so we’re just talking about bog standard touch typing here.

            Even though I don’t game, I ended up preferring the Reds to all. The blues are just too loud to use around others or on a conference call, plus I found–despite my attempts otherwise–I was always bottoming it out anyway. Similarly, the since I always bottom out anyway, the feedback of the brown was useless, and just felt like grit on the stroke. Blacks were nice, but I didn’t care for the higher force requirement. I make more mistakes on reds than any others due to the lower force, but I still prefer them–and type faster, overall.

            People ask me for switch recommendations all the time, and I just have to tell them that they really need to try them all to figure out what they like best.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This