Report: Early Ryzen benchmarks show promise

The AMD-provided benchmarks for the company's upcoming Ryzen CPUs have painted the chips in a very favorable light indeed. Wiser heads know to wait for third-party data before making any judgements, though. As it turns out, some of that data is already trickling out. A reddit user posted what is reportedly a leaked image taken from the newest issue of French tech magazine Canard PC, presenting benchmarks of what appears to be a Ryzen engineering sample.

I'll cut to the chase: in synthetic and productivity benchmarks like video encoding, 3D rendering, and CAD, the Ryzen sample sits comfortably between the 6-core Core i7-6800K and the 8-core i7-6900K. Meanwhile, in gaming benchmarks, the Ryzen sample sits between the Core i5-6500 and Core i5-6600 CPUs. All in all, not a bad showing for an engineering sample of AMD's new chip.

The performance of this chip is impressive considering that Canard PC says its sample runs at a base clock of 3.15 GHz and a turbo speed of 3.3 GHz. That's significantly below the 3.4 GHz base clock that AMD promised in a recent presentation. While Canard PC doesn't state it outright, the low clock rate likely stems from the fact that the CPU in question is an engineering sample. Higher clock speeds on the final parts might enable Summit Ridge to catch up with Intel's faster Skylake parts in gaming benchmarks.

Another notable fact is that the Ryzen CPU reportedly drew about 90W under load, after accounting for losses in the motherboard's voltage regulators. That puts the engineering sample that Canard PC tested smack into the same efficiency range as the Core i7-6900K, a CPU that drew a bit more power in exchange for more performance.

Going by these numbers, it looks like Ryzen might be the leap forward that AMD needs to become a contender in the high-end CPU market again. Not only does this chip appear to hold its own against the blue team's competition, it utterly annihilates the four-year-old Piledriver-based FX-8370 processor in both performance and efficiency. Of course, given that these are unverified benchmarks of an engineering sample for an unreleased processor, keep the salt shaker handy. In any case, we're eager to get our hands on one of the new chips to put it through its paces.

Comments closed
    • Kaleid
    • 3 years ago

    He has…ryzen?

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 3 years ago

    I missed something. What happened to Zen? Or is Ry*Zen* the Zen I’d been hearing about?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      I wrote a nice little article explaining the change: [url<]https://techreport.com/review/31105/amd-crests-summit-ridge-with-ryzen-cpus[/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        It’s just like when a caterpillar goes into its chrysallis and comes out as a BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLY!!

        Except you don’t call it a butterfly, you call it a Ry-Caterpillar.

        • southrncomfortjm
        • 3 years ago

        How delightfully useful. You get a thumbs up for this.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    Does anyone else find it interesting that a 3.3Ghz Turbo Zen was keeping pace with a 3.9Ghz Turbo i5 in games? That suggests a higher IPC than Intel parts, which no one is expecting.

    Or will this be like all those leaked Bulldozer benchmarks…

    • wingless
    • 3 years ago

    AMD will never defeat Intel! I enjoy paying monopolistic prices for Intel CPUs! It makes me feel so ELITE!!!! ……….oh wait

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I’d hate to douse your excitement guys but for those who’d like to stick with Windows 7 (or 8) you may want to wait and see how ‘Zen (and Kaby Lake) do with Win7.

      • mesyn191
      • 3 years ago

      It’ll work just fine with either OS. Those OSes just won’t support some of the latest CPU features is all.

      Win2000 for instance didn’t properly support Hyperthreading but it would still run just fine on a P4 though I believe it was generally recommended that you would disable that feature in the BIOS when running that OS.

      That was a issue specific to Win2K and Hyperthreading though. There is no reason at this point to believe you’d have to disable anything in the BIOS when using Zen and Win7 or Win8.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        I’m more concerned about drivers and missing functionality or suboptimal performance. But work? Yeah I’m sure Zen will let me boot Win7.

        Ze[u<]7[/u<]n.

          • ptsant
          • 3 years ago

          The OS has to do surprisingly little. Power management is probably the thing that changes the most between CPUs, but standard states are dictated by APM/ACPI and are universal between processors.

          There is some stuff on the CPU hat used to be exotic and require OS support like the programmable IRQ controller (APIC), but this is very very old news or the NX bit, also old news or support for virtualization, also very old news.

          Anyway, I surely hope that AMD will provide Win 7 drivers.

      • wingless
      • 3 years ago

      It’s almost 2017. It’s time to give up your decade old OS and embrace the Dark Side!…I mean Windows 10.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Well, not a decade old yet, but 2009 is a long time ago in PC years. It’s like running Snow Leopard on a Mac. Come to think of it, both OSes have kind of gone downhill since that time…

    • Unknown-Error
    • 3 years ago

    Still skeptical but moving towards cautiously optimistic. It seems Canard PC has some more benchmarks that are quite promising even surprising. Core speeds are 3.15 (Base)/3.3(All-core)/3.5(single) GHz but they may not have the latest BIOS from what I have heard. There is also supposed to be an SMT bug in the early versions as well. So with a newer BIOS, newer revisions, even with the same clock-speed, they might be able to squeeze some more performance. Very least all-core boost can be expected to be 3.4 GHz or higher at launch.

    These bench marks are far more promising than the initial Bulldozer leaks, which performed worse that earlier Phenom II CPUs in gaming and single-threaded benchmarks.

    The problem is when is the actual Zen retail availability? We will probably see some more stuff during January CES but will it be in shops by February or March?

    • Pancake
    • 3 years ago

    Here’s hoping the leaked benchmarks aren’t a canard!

    • Welch
    • 3 years ago

    So is it just me or does anyone else see the Ryzen chip’s ability to “Turbo” with the new mesh network of who knows how many thermal sensors as a way of saying…

    “Hey, you don’t need to manually overclock, we can do it faster, better and more stable.”

    That is my take on it, and if it is done properly, I think that manual overclocking might be a thing of the past with the exception of the random enthusiast who feels the need to be in 6th gear 100% of the time.

    Seems like AMD and Intel with “Turbo Clocks” have been attempting to kill the getting something for nothing mentality for some time. This newest and supposedly more accurate attempt from AMD may just be the final word.

      • mesyn191
      • 3 years ago

      Its quite possible the “auto overclocking” that Zen is supposed to be doing is more conservative than what a manual overclock can wring out of the chip. Personally I suspect that Zen can qualify just fine at higher clockspeeds than what they’re willing to launch with, just not within the ~90w TDP that they’ve set, and this is their way of trying to offer people some extra performance to differentiate their stuff from Intel’s.

      Given how cheap and reliable AIO watercooling units have gotten it could be a nice feature for those of us who want more performance without having to do the tedious process of trial and error typical of manual overclocking. Personally I don’t mind doing it, but that is just me.

      Apparently lots of people are perfectly fine with a chip that is only stable enough to run Prime95 for 10-12 hours if it gets them a great overclock too. Yeah they’ll have more BSOD’s and reboots but in a desktop home machine it might be worth it.

        • Welch
        • 3 years ago

        No doubt that a good manual overclock may result in a higher clock speed. I’d say you are dead right. Thermal driven overclocks aren’t a new thing, most GPU board manufacturers have their own flavor, MSI afterburner to name one. A lot of them let you set a “Fast, Faster, Fastest” type settings. The major difference is AMD’s mesh of sensors and the chips ability to change clock’s per core within fractions of a second.

        Now if you can set a hard ceiling integer of say… 4.5 and it will attempt to do that on an aggressive OC profile, i’d say that manual overclocking is going to become a rare beast.

        Out of box, no doubt it is going to be conservative and favor stability. How much control AMD gives you and I will determine how enthusiasts receive these new features. As a general user/gamer type someone may be happy to go from base 3.4ghz to 3.6ghz. An enthusiast who put on after market cooling would rather push the 4.0+ barrier and now not have to do anything but set an aggressive profile, knowing it will cool down when it doesn’t need the OC.

        Exciting prospects, software implementation will be everything with this feature. Perhaps it will give the impression to us consumers that we are truly getting something extra with auto and hands off OCing. Again, assuming they implement it properly.

      • CuttinHobo
      • 3 years ago

      I must say I really like the sound of this new turbo scheme, and I appreciate AMD pushing the envelope. We hear about people overclocking to 4.5GHz+ all the time, yet TurboBoost is so very conservative. That white-knuckle grandma doing 61.5MPH in a 60 zone…

      More aggressive Turbo is going to be the single largest improvement we’ve seen in poorly-threaded applications in ages, I bet.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Lisa said there are literally hundreds of sensors all around the chip. HUNDREDS!!!

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      From what I’ve read, the chip integrates a bunch of sensors all over the silicon, a sophisticated predictive model of power consumption/temperature and reacts in sub-sub-second speeds to adjust to the maximum potential frequency all the time. It’s driving itself as hard as possible.

      You can only turn two knobs (frequency, FSB ratio). How can you beat the turbo-algorithm?

      Yeah, OK, I’m oversimplifying because presumably you can push even more current/voltage, add exotic cooling etc. But having done some epic overclocking as a poor PhD student, I’m happy I no longer need to do that and can rely on the wisdom (?) of AMD/Intel engineers.

      PS Undervolting is fun though.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 3 years ago

    If the numbers so far are accurate, it looks quite promising.

    Now, if they attach the heat spreader with a good TIM (SOLDER IT) so that heat transfer isn’t an issue and if they the clock speed is flexible with proper cooling… this could be a monster.

    I somehow don’t see AMD pricing it so that it is too expensive to be competitive either, so I’m optimistic that this will work out well.

    If IPC was similar I’d opt for a 4C\8T version myself, especially if it allowed for higher clocks and a much lower price.

    EDIT: Also wanted to mention that they’d better not mess this up by having a significant problem in the chip or the chipset. With such a promising looking product they simply cannot afford to blow it by releasing something that is bugged. Intel has done it more than once, but they could afford to… AMD needs to take all the time they need to be sure this thing is spotless in this regard.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    Depends on their price point. If they are selling their chip at $500-$800 as many sites have mentioned, then that’s not much savings over intel’s cpus. How well AMD can market the product and get their old customers back is a totally different story. Nobody wants to be left hanging for almost a decade.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      If it really does trade blows with Broadwell-E, it won’t be cheap. That’s a lot of silicon and a lot of R&D backing it up. That said, if this is the case it means that AMD has vastly improved IPC and could spin up a more economical 4-6 core CPU to compete with Intel’s lower end stuff.

        • travbrad
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah if they want design wins in a lot of pre-built consumer PCs competing with Broadwell-E isn’t the way to do it. That is a niche market and way more performance and cores/threads than the average person needs, so hopefully their 4-6 core designs are good as well like you said. Maybe they will even clock a bit higher since less cores usually means less heat/higher clocks. Even if those “prosumer” CPUs are a niche market at least AMD will have something to offer there now too. When is the last time anyone could reasonably justify spending $500-800 on an AMD CPU?

        They should be able to make some good Zen-based Opterons for the server market too, which tend to have pretty good profit margins compared to consumer chips. It’s been almost impossible to justify AMD for servers in recent years because of their lackluster performance and massive efficiency/power/heat disadvantage compared to Intel.

      • BaronMatrix
      • 3 years ago

      There will be quad…

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I think I read somewhere that AM4 is already out but I’m not sure which chipset it launched with. So how’s the proper chipset for ‘Zen shaping up? It would be great to see a non-Intel chipset do everything well, or at least better than AMD’s tired old chipsets anyway. Don’t get me wrong, I think my 990FX chipset works fine but I’m not sure everyone is entirely happy with it.

      • terranup16
      • 3 years ago

      AMD launched OEM APUs on a lower-end variant of the AM4 chipset. We can’t really draw many conclusions from that yet because it would be like trying to compare the Z170 chipset to the H110, if even that.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      The 990FX/SB950 chipset does an adequate job. The problem is, it was never updated to add USB 3.0 support, and this meant mobo vendors tended to pair it with craptastic ASMedia USB chipsets.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        And rumors saying Asmedia was contracted to do the chipset for Zen is cause for concern for some also. Not me though. Heck, I’d be open to a SiS or VIA AM4 chipset if they are on the list too.

          • maxxcool
          • 3 years ago

          Ah the good old days.. I remember ALi chipset being very decent.

            • just brew it!
            • 3 years ago

            The best Super 7 board I owned (Micronics C200) was ALi based. It gave me many years of faithful service (even worked with K6-III+ mobile chips after flashing a hacked BIOS), before eventually joining Starfalcon’s collection.

    • cybot_x1024
    • 3 years ago

    I will only believe it when I see actual benchmarks from credible sources.
    I remember when bulldozer leaked around the time it launched there was this rumour going around saying that it was 50% faster than the Phenom 1100T. It was really disappointing to see what it turned out to be.
    That said I really can’t wait to see what it can do when it launches.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    2004 – AMD: “Welcome to AMD64, Intel.”
    2008 – AMD: “Welcome to the world of IMCs, Intel.”
    2017 – Intel: “Welcome back to the land of the living, AMD.”

    • mkk
    • 3 years ago

    I’d like to see some dirty motherboard shots rather than more benchmarks at this point. Even the exact prices are less intriguing, but then again they pretty much had me at the 8C/16T announcement…

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      Board info is a good point, because aside from the per-core performance gap AMD has been plagued with poor boards and chipsets for quite a while. The mere fact that OC memory and even DDR4 brought only minor performance increases gives a good indication of how far ahead the blue team is right now. Hopefully they’ll pull it off, but it would not surprise me if it takes another iteration for their OEM partners to get it right.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 3 years ago

    Let’s hope they release a 4core part with significantly higher clocks that competes better against a 6700k.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      The 4-core part will come later and won’t be faster in single-threaded. At best same frequency. Although you may be able to achieve better OC.

    • ermo
    • 3 years ago

    Would it be churlish to suggest waiting 6-9 months for the release+1 CPU stepping (which will likely yield +200 MHz base clocks or so) and properly debugged and developed ASMedia chipsets?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      +3 for use of “churlish” in a comment.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      If the last few years haven’t been long enough for ASMedia, what’s another 6-9 months going to do? 😉

        • ermo
        • 3 years ago

        I would suggest that fielding a new chipset to the enthusiast PC market is more likely than not to expose any remaining hardware/software bugs not caught during internal validation, and as such, 6-9 months ought to be sufficient time for any potential issues to be exposed and worked around/resolved?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          Probably true, but ASMedia has had years to get their SATA and USB controllers to work as well as the Intel built-in equivalents. So far they’ve failed.

          The good news is that “chipsets” on motherboards these days aren’t much more than that along with some PCI-Express lanes, since the memory controller and most of the PCIe connectivity is built into the CPU.

      • Kougar
      • 3 years ago

      AMD fans have been waiting nine years so what difference will nine more months make, right? 😉

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      I think it will probably take 6-9 mo just to develop the product vertically from the top-end at launch (8c/16t) to the 4c/8t 6-9mo later. Then the APUs are coming. There is a lot of excitement in the next 9 months, enough to not need a new top-end product.

      I would expect a new stepping maybe 12 mo later, at best before holidays 2017 but with availability jan-feb 2018.

      Anyway, I can barely wait until feb-march: my M/B no longer keeps BIOS settings and has to be CMOS cleared every day. Yes, I changed the CMOS battery.

    • barich
    • 3 years ago

    This is promising. I haven’t built a system around an AMD CPU since 2004 and I had never built an Intel one until the Core 2 Duo came out in 2006. Intel clearly needs competition at the high end to keep their pricing in line and strive for more than just incremental performance improvements.

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    Looks promising, hopefully they can offer better value while also substantially uplifting their margins. Sink or swim time folks, they may have enough in the bank to float for a while more, but nothing in the pipeline has as substantial an impact as this.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    The only thing so far that would make me upgrade from my FX-8350 is Thief 4 which I picked up back in 2014 and it was only a few days ago that I began to take it seriously. Back then I think it didn’t run as well as I wanted it to but after 2 years of collecting dust in my closet it seems to run very well, averaging something like 55fps and topping out at 70fps with my HD7770 at 1280 x 720 (720p). Maybe it’s Mantle which is now supported or maybe Eidos managed to make the game itself utilize more cores this long after release. Task Manager says all 8 cores are running although there’s one main thread maxing out one core (~90%) and all the other cores are running at something like 15-20%. Not too shabby. Finally got a use for all those cores. I never transcode videos or compress stuff, at least not for a long time.

    So all in all, it looks like the only reason for me to get Zen just got canceled. I know Bulldozer suxxx but I just love this unique core design. Maybe I’ll be OK until Zen 2.0 or Zen 3.0 hits.

    Edit – It seems someone isn’t happy that I’m still happy with my 8350. Really.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]I know Bulldozer suxxx but I just love this unique core design.[/quote<] Aww, c'mon... it doesn't [i<]suck[/i<], it was still a decent bang for the buck (assuming you didn't pay MSRP at launch), even if it didn't live up to the hype. But "unique" doesn't always mean "better"... sometimes it just means "different".

        • DancinJack
        • 3 years ago

        Unique [i<]always[/i<] means different.

        • ermo
        • 3 years ago

        Wasn’t it dpaus who noted that for his particular heavily thread java use case, the FX-8350 basically *killed* at its price point? But yeah, those kinds of scenarios were few and far between.

        I’m still sore that we didn’t get to see a 28nm Excavator-derived 4-module/8-core design sans GPU but with more L2 and a big chunk of L3 cache.

          • ptsant
          • 3 years ago

          For my multithreaded requirements, the FX 8350 has been a great buy for me. Plus I have ECC support. Gaming is not the strongest point, but I never had trouble with any game. It gets the job done…

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          He was comparing an FX-8350 to a quad core Sandy/Ivy bridge part from a similar era for that workload. Considering that the FX-8350 — like Zen — was supposed to be a “server chip” first and a desktop chip second, I could see it performing somewhat better than Intel’s quad core parts that are mobile chips first and “server” chips second.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        It doesn’t suck in and of itself. But ‘suck’ is a relative term in the world of computers. I’m not comparing it to Intel’s current stuff, against which it’ll suck, I’m comparing it to all my previous CPUs. And in that regard it’s absolutely fantastic : it’s more powerful and more efficient than ALL my previous chips combined. And it’s probably cheaper than many of them when you factor in inflation.

        So no, how can it suck when it kills all my other chips, many of which were considered proper CPU designs? But look the other way and I think, yeah, it kinda sucks.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 3 years ago

        At launch they could barely beat the performance of their own Phenom IIs. I think that qualifies as sucking.

          • just brew it!
          • 3 years ago

          True… but he’s actually got a Piledriver core CPU, not original Bulldozer.

    • astrotech66
    • 3 years ago

    As an old AMD fan, I really hope Ryzen lives up to all this early hype. I’m planning to upgrade my current i7-2600K build with something new in the first half of 2017. If Ryzen turns out to be competitive with an i5-6600 or better, then I’ll definitely go that way. It’d be nice to be able to build an AMD-based system again without feeling like it’s a compromise.

      • flip-mode
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]As an old AMD fan[/quote<] It has honestly been a while since there has been a Intel/AMD flame war on the actual merits of the tech. 2017 could be the year.

      • Veerappan
      • 3 years ago

      You and me both.

      I’ve still got a Phenom II x6 1055t (2.8ghz) in my home desktop, and I’m building a new machine as soon as Ryzen is out… Whether I buy AMD or not depends on price/performance, and whether AMD finally showed up to the game again.

      I’m willing to accept below absolute max performance, as long as the pricing is acceptable, and the power efficiency is decent. It’s looking like performance/power are hopeful. Now we need to see where their pricing lands them with regards to the logical competitors.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      I broke down and built a high-end Intel system a couple of months ago, so AMD has a very good chance of becoming amazing again. You’re welcome, guys. 🙂

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 3 years ago

    It’s about time. Let the performance wars begin again (and hopefully some price wars too).

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    Here’s hoping that the supporting platform is also decent. It sure would be nice to have onboard USB 3.x solutions that actually work.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      Although I can’t say what Ryzen brings, the AM4 socket APUs provide 4xUSB 3.1 on the CPU (not on the MB).

      See here:
      [url<]http://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/AMD-AM4-Chipset-Features.jpg[/url<] I would expect with a little luck to get 3.1 G2 from Ryzen, but I don't care that much.

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        Hopefully the on-chip controller is decent then. My concern is still relevant, given the rumor that AM4’s USB 3.x support was an ASMedia design. They may have simply incorporated ASMedia’s USB block onto the APU.

        A secondary concern is reliability. I’ve seen cases where USB ports were permanently damaged by a particularly bad static electricity jolt. With a direct connection to external, front panel, hot pluggable ports, are we potentially exposing the APU to an elevated risk of ESD damage? I guess at the end of the day the difference doesn’t matter that much; fried motherboard vs. fried APU is probably about equally expensive to repair either way. Or just live with the fried port (assuming the damage is confined to the USB controller).

    • gmskking
    • 3 years ago

    I will most likely be getting the SR7. Definitely not getting Intel for my upcoming build.

    • flip-mode
    • 3 years ago

    Must…. maintain…. skepticism…. don’t want another…. AMD disappointment.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Let the hype flow through you boy.

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        It’s already to the point that I think there’s hope. That’s quite far enough. There’s hope, but as an old boss of mine used to say, hope in one hand and shart in the other and tell me what you’ve got.

        AND THEN, we all have to keep in mine how slow AMD product launches usually are. Launching in Q1? That’ll be then end of Q1, mister. H1? Same thing. And launching first to OEMs and only for limited SKUs. Available in retail 3-6 months later, also in limited SKUs. Estimated time for full delivery of that particular CPU model you wanted in retail: could be as much as 6-9 months after launch, probably at a couple hundred MHz slower than you thought, with lower boost clock than you thought, and possibly with another caveat or two thrown in. Edit: Ah, skepticism restored!

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]It's already to the point that I think there's hope. [/quote<] A [i<]new[/i<] hope you might say?

            • w76
            • 3 years ago

            But we know what follows that: the Intel Strikes Back.

            • Tirk
            • 3 years ago

            But that means there will also be: Return of the Zen die.

            • chuckula
            • 3 years ago

            Oh no, you’ve already confirmed a rebrand (with Ewoks) before Zen launches!

            • Tirk
            • 3 years ago

            I would definitely buy a rebrand if they promised to shove the guts of Ewoks in them.

            Then it will come full rebrand circle with: The geForce Awakens

            • ptsant
            • 3 years ago

            They better do. Generational improvements at 5% are a joke.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 3 years ago

            [blank’d!]

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<] I think there's hope[/quote<] PLATFORM WARS EPISODE AM4: I THINK THERE'S HOPE It is a period of great anticipation. AMD's CEO, striking from a stage live-streamed on Twitch, has won her first victory in ages against the evil S2011v3 Empire. During the battle, AMD techs managed to steal benchmark wins against the Empire's ultimate weapon, the CORE I7-6900K, a huge CPU with enough memory bandwidth to consume entire worlds. Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Lisa Su races home aboard her chartered flight, custodian of the Ryzen that can save her company and restore choice to desktop CPUs.

            • flip-mode
            • 3 years ago

            Aw man you made me laugh.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            I’m here to help!

          • Spunjji
          • 3 years ago

          Kudos to your boss for a fecking brilliant phrase.

      • blastdoor
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve been feeling the same thing.

      It occurred to me just now that maybe we have become lazy in our skepticism about AMD. Because AMD has given us so much to be skeptical about, we haven’t really had to put much thought into it.

      For example, there’s more to selling a great CPU than just designing it. You also have to manufacture it. Presumably AMD will be relying on… the foundry whose name must not be spoken (hint — it operates globally).

        • SoulSlave
        • 3 years ago

        I’m not so sure that would be such a big problem, as far as I remember, the contract between the two states that AMD must order a minimum number of wafer but also states that GF must be able to supply their demand, otherwise AMD is free to outsource her manufacturing needs elsewhere.

        So, should GF become unable to meet the demand, Samsung would be a natural choice to cover for the missing supply. Their manufacturing process being the same and all.

        And for samsung it would be wildly beneficial as well, seeing as apple does not order as many wafers from them as they once did.

        Here is to keeping our hopes UP!

          • blastdoor
          • 3 years ago

          Even if I could read the contract between AMD and GF, I wouldn’t understand it.

          But for all practical purposes, I doubt that provision (if it exists) is all that useful to AMD. I have to believe that GF only would agree to such a provision if it was heavily caveated. There’s just no way that GF would accept a contract in which AMD could run to Samsung anytime yields dipped a bit. Quite the contrary — I suspect it would have to be an apocalyptic screw up before AMD could really switch to Samsung. And even then — switching would not be painless. Samsung’s processes might similar to GF, but are they really truly identical? I know that was the goal at one point, but my impression that was more of a goal than a reality.

          So…. yeah. I think there’s plenty of room for justified skepticism about GF.

            • SoulSlave
            • 3 years ago

            Well, it is provisioned in their latest amendment to the contract:
            [url<]http://ir.amd.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=74093&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=2198716[/url<] Of course they do not state which products they want to outsource should the need arise. Could very well be console SOCs for all I know. But they really wanted to guarantee their supply. As far as technology goes, I'm not really qualified to comment, but seeing as everyone touts process node techs as really difficult and expensive to achieve (I'm sure it really is) and the fact that GF paid a truckload of money to Samsung for that very tech and expertise it seems unrealistic to me that they would go to such lengths to change the process midway. Also, I remember that deal being somewhat hasted (is that the word? English is not my native language). [quote="blastdoor"<] So.... yeah. I think there's plenty of room for justified skepticism about GF.[/quote<] I'm sure there is. But I'd like to think that AMD has learned their lesson from their past mistakes.

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        Heh, yeah, I have not had to put any effort into keeping a robust skepticism of AMD processors for a long time. I’m almost breaking a sweat hanging on to it right now.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      I just hope they HARD launch the thing. I want day 1 availability at MSRP. OK, I’ll settle for a few weeks delay, but not months. And I’m not paying a dollar extra.

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        I’m betting we’ll see day 1 availability in pre-built systems but not retail boxed CPUs. TBH I actually [i<]hope[/i<] this is the case, because it means the big OEMs are interested enough to absorb all of the initial production run. AMD needs those big design wins for Zen to succeed.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like it’s time to Ryzen shine!

      • Sargent Duck
      • 3 years ago

      I see what you did there…

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      The staff already did that joke back when Ryzen was officially announced. No soup for you!

        • Neutronbeam
        • 3 years ago

        Alright, then I attribute it the TR staff and offer it as a homage since it is a classic line. OTOH, I think it’s funnier when I say it. 🙂

          • morphine
          • 3 years ago

          Still no soup for you 😛

            • Neutronbeam
            • 3 years ago

            You are tough my friend…not even a little Caldo Verde?

            • morphine
            • 3 years ago

            Sorry, I offered what I had [url=https://techreport.com/news/31170/tr-12-days-of-giveaways-corsair-huge-gift-haul<]to the TR Santa[/url<].

      • chµck
      • 3 years ago

      Is it supposed to be “rye-zen”? I’ve been going with “risen”

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 years ago

        AMD CEO said Rye-Zen.

    • blastdoor
    • 3 years ago

    This is really encouraging.

    • Techgoudy
    • 3 years ago

    This is the first time I have gotten excited for anything dealing with AMD in a good long while. I’m in the mood to upgrade my i7-2600 and this could be a good contender when it comes around.

      • odizzido
      • 3 years ago

      My processor is even older but intel hasn’t put anything out that is good enough for the price yet. Hoping AMD can offer something that looks good to me.

      • Magic Hate Ball
      • 3 years ago

      I only upgraded from my i7-875k because my coworker sold me his i7-4770K + Rampage IV mobo + 16gb of RAM for $125 total earlier this year when he upgraded to Skylake…

      I feel bad because I wanted to wait for Zen but the deal was too good.

        • Spunjji
        • 3 years ago

        If it helps, you provided 0 direct cash to Intel. Put the savings into a brand-new Zen! 😉

        • odizzido
        • 3 years ago

        I’d have taken that. That’s a good deal.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Insufficient hype levels!

    Incidentally, if this magazine is actually available to anybody, could we get a link to their actual article instead of Reddit?

    [Edit: And yet again we see the easiest way to get downthumbed in an AMD article: Ask for complete information from the original source that is supposedly [b<]good news[/b<] for an AMD product :-P]

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      My understanding is that while they have a website, the meat of their work ends up in print. Could be wrong, but my impression is that there’s nothing to link to.

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        OK. I will hop on a plane and let you know what it says tomorrow then. 😉

      • ultima_trev
      • 3 years ago

      AMD needs this to be true. IPC within 5-6% of Broadwell E and (hopefully) 5% higher (at least) clocks and performance per watt that isn’t too far behind. Prices need to undercut Intel a bit too, albeit they could probably price it above the rumored $500 mark and still sell (hopefully it would not be priced too much more).

      • Yeats
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t trust anything they print, it’s just a canard.

      • njoydesign
      • 3 years ago

      here is the full scan of the article if you can read french

      [url<]http://imgur.com/a/qo9pH[/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        OOH OIE MOUSSIER BAGUETTE BONSOIRI!!

        [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRlcpKu9aqI<]FRENCH TOAST![/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        Interesting read. I’m certainly not fluent in le Frenchie but a technical article is easy enough to decipher.

        The most ironic thing I can see is that most of the post is a big negative piece about Intel with an intentionally loaded question saying “La Fin x86?” while simultaneously devoting a much smaller amount of space to proclaiming how great Zen is… you know, that x86 Zen processor?

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