HandBrake reaches version 1.0.0 after 13 years of development

The HandBrake project has reached version 1.0.0 after 13 years in development. Originally started as a convenient DVD ripping software for BeOS, the project has grown in recent years to become one of the foremost video transcoding software packages. The new version comes 14 months after the 0.10 release, and includes over 1700 individual source commits added since then.

Naturally, the 1.0.0 release comes complete with a bevy of bugfixes and new features. The biggest items on the list are probably support for Google's VP9 video codec, hardware-accelerated HEVC encoding on Intel Skylake and newer processors, and a complete overhaul of the default presets. Handbrake 1.0 also adds the Opus audio codec to its support list, well as 10- and 12-bit video with the appropriate codecs. The full changelog can be found on GitHub.

HandBrake's documentation also received a much-needed rework. While the new docs are still a work in progress (the project blog refers to them as beta), they're meant to be less technical and easier to read. The new documentation includes step-by-step guides for common tasks to make it easier for new users to get started with video transcoding. Grab the new release at the official HandBrake website.

Comments closed
    • maroon1
    • 3 years ago

    How to encode to 10-bit H.265 ?! I don’t see any option !!

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    THIRTEEN years to get to version 1.0.0??? Boo!! These guys are LAZY!!

    You guys should learn from Firefox and Chrome! Those guys ROCK!!!

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    This has to be one of the best examples of how great open source software can be. Congrats to the community and their long road to this milestone.

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    Eh…. Still no vapoursynth/avisynth support, and no AMD/Nvidia encoding block support.

    StaxRip or MeGUI may not be as pretty, but once you get used to either, it makes this release of Handbreak feel obsolete.

      • zealeus
      • 3 years ago

      But they’re both Windows only support unless I’m missing something?

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, that’s the catch. Avisynth is the ultimately tied to Windows, as are some other useful tools/filters.

        I’m pretty sure there’s a vapoursynth editor for Linux, which is perfect since any Linux users tend to be familiar with scripting anyway.

    • bowman
    • 3 years ago

    I love this app. Great compression without destroying the video, and convenient and simple interface. I’m glad to see it’s being actively developed.

    • jstern
    • 3 years ago

    Speaking of next gen codecs. The future, as in next year is AV1. As in AOMedia Video 1. It will encode roughly .25 of an .mp4 file, with the same quality. And it’s being supported by Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, Amazon, NetFlix, ARM, AMD. Better than HEVC, open source with the goal of avoiding patent battles.

      • Airmantharp
      • 3 years ago

      Thanks for the update!

      Looks like AV1 might actually be the everyman codec; also, it might overcome the barriers to acceptance that were built into HEVC and quickly gain widespread consumer electronics acceptance.

      Would love to see some 4k REC2020 support in consumer cameras, for example!

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      mp4 is a container, not a codec, so its size depends on a plethora of parameters. AV1 will be as good as its community, as long as there’s hardware support from manufacturers. If nobody encodes with it, it’s not going to last long. HEVC is still struggling adaptation since hardware support is limited.

        • jstern
        • 3 years ago

        I’m comparing HEVC to AV1. HEVC has lost a lot of support from major corporations like Microsoft which was going to support it in Windows 10. While all major corporations are flocking to AV1. Google essentially donated VP10 to them, and plans on supporting VP1 on YouTube 6 months after the final specs are finalized.

        • UberGerbil
        • 3 years ago

        You’ve got two groups with conflicting goals, each championing their own competing standard. The traditional media companies (via MPEG) are lined up behind HEVC; the tech companies and “new new media” companies are backing AV1. Part of the reason HEVC is struggling is because the latter don’t want to have to [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding#Patent_licensing<]pay to license the patents[/url<]. Once upon a time, the content providers had all the leverage and could call the shots, but these days the tech tail is wagging the content dog. And once upon a time, discrete devices (eg video players) and content packaging (ie discs) determined which codecs actually mattered, but those days are done. Today a codec will succeed if it has the support of the important streaming providers (Youtube aka Google, Netflix, and Amazon) and the major browser makers (Mozilla, Google, and Microsoft). That's pretty much all you need, and AV1 has them all.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<][The Alliance’s founding members are Amazon, Cisco, Google, Intel Corporation, Microsoft, Mozilla and Netflix. [/quote<] [url<]http://aomedia.org/press-releases/alliance-to-deliver-next-generation-open-media-formats/[/url<]

    • torquer
    • 3 years ago

    Will it run Crysis?

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      I bet it can encode a Crysis gameplay video just fine, so the answer is a resounding “yes.”

    • joselillo_25
    • 3 years ago

    can this sofware use the GPU to encode?

      • ermo
      • 3 years ago

      Per [url=https://handbrake.fr/docs/en/1.0.0/technical/video-codecs.html<]the manual[/url<], Handbrake supports H.264/AVC using intel quicksync (Haswell or later recommended).

        • snowMAN
        • 3 years ago

        Intel Quicksync is fast, but produces worse quality than x.264.

      • xeridea
      • 3 years ago

      I think there is limited support, the GPU can be used to accelerate decoding of source content, but this only gets a minor speedup for BluRay, and I think just on slower CPUs. It is difficult to code GPUs to do video encoding, due to complexity, and some limitations of memory access, and OpenCl. HSA would make it significantly easier though.

      If you are talking of say QuickSync, it does support that.

        • the
        • 3 years ago

        OpenCL and CUDA encoders do exist but these tend to be included as part of a full fledged editing package. Something like this can be developed from scratch for Handbrake but no one seems interested.

        There are also libraries for using the hardware encoder found on recent AMD and nVidia GPUs too but there are issues using them with Handbrake from my understanding. Intel got Quicksync support because Intel pretty much wrote a good chunk of the code. They needed a good use-case example for QuickSync and this was an excellent example.

          • DragonDaddyBear
          • 3 years ago

          Xerida mentioned HSA so I did a quick search to see if that was coming. In the process I found the link below. I have no idea how to use it, though. The anandtech article is from 2012, but Phoronix says it OpenCL was in 0.9.9 in 2013 as a beta feature (as was quicksync)

          Anyone know how to enable that or tested it?

          [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/5835/testing-opencl-accelerated-handbrakex264-with-amds-trinity-apu[/url<] [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/5835/testing-opencl-accelerated-handbrakex264-with-amds-trinity-apu[/url<]

      • HERETIC
      • 3 years ago

      Known fact-GPU encode is inferior to pure CPU encode.
      CPU only encode generally provides better quality per file size………………………

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