Lenovo shows off updated ThinkPads with Kaby Lake CPUs

Ahead of this year's Consumer Electronics Show, Lenovo announced that it's refreshed its lineup of ThinkPad laptops. The headline feature for the updated machines is that they're fitted with Intel Kaby Lake CPUs. Lenovo has other tricks up its sleeve, though. Other nitfy features include new touchpads supporting Microsoft's Precision Touchpad, fingerprint sensors, and new connectivity options including Wi-Fi Certified WiGig. In total, there are nine new laptops to discuss, so let's get started.

First up is the ThinkPad X270. This thin-and-trim notebook is 0.8" thick and weighs 2.9 lbs. The base model is equipped with a 1366×768 TN panel, which we suggest upgrading to the 1920×1080 IPS option. Lenovo claims that the X270's battery can power the device for up to a whopping 21 hours. The ThinkPad X270 starts at $909, and will be available in March.

Flexible notebooks in Lenovo's ThinkPad Yoga line are known for their multi-mode operation. The new ThinkPad Yoga 370 packs a new screen: a 1920×1080 13.3" display. It ships with an integrated pen, a Thunderbolt 3 port, and an optional touch fingerprint reader. At 0.7" thick, it's just a little leaner than the ThinkPad X270 above. Lenovo claims that the Yoga 730 can last 10.5 hours between charges, and plans to ship it in March. Pricing starts at $1264.

Need a notebook that can handle some abuse? Lenovo says the new ThinkPad 13 is durable enough to pass military-grade toughness requirements, so it might survive being used by a toddler. It has a 13.3" 1920×1080 display like the Yoga 370, but lacks the Thunderbolt 3 port. The notebook is 0.77" thick, weighs 3.17 lbs, and Lenovo says it'll last 11 hours on battery. The company plans to make the $674 ThinkPad 13 available in January.

Next up are four new T-series notebooks: the T470s, T470, T470p, and T570. At 2.9 lbs, the T470s is the lightest of the bunch, and can be equipped with a 14" 2560×1440 IPS display. It'll ship in February, and starts at $1099. The T470 doesn't offer a high-resolution screen, but has a heftier battery that Lenovo claims will run for up to 18 hours. It'll be available in February as well, with the base model selling for $909.

Lenovo equipped the T470p with an Nvidia N16S-GTR GPU (apparently a GeForce 940MX), and there's an optional upgrade for a 2560×1440 IPS display. It'll sell for $1049 starting in March. The ThinkPad T570 is the last and largest of the bunch. Lenovo offers multiple storage option on this machine, which can be equipped with a 15.6" UHD display. In the graphics department, it's powered by Nvidia's 940MX GPU. Lenovo claims the T570's two batteries should be good for about 16 hours of usage on a single charge. This model starts at $1049, and will be available in March.

Finally, Lenovo is offering two new L-series laptops. The ThinkPad L470 has a 14" 720p display that can be upgraded to a 1920×1080 panel. For its graphics muscle, Lenovo turned to AMD's Radeon R5 M430. It weighs 4.23 lbs, and will be available in March at a starting price of $779. The L570 offers a larger 15.6" display, but otherwise has very similar specs as the L470. Lenovo plans to sell the base L570 model for $809, and it will also be selling in March.

One of the more intriguing features of all these laptops is that they are available with a "Signature Edition" of Windows 10 Professional which contains no trialware or unwanted apps. Lenovo claims that this approach allows the company to optimize the performance of the laptops, eliminate distractions for users, and make life a little easier for the local IT staff.

Comments closed
    • cegras
    • 3 years ago

    Still don’t understand why lenovo doesn’t have an option with iris pro graphics.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    After the security fiascos and their decision to significantly reduce the functionality my Moto Assistant (no longer reads or responds to texts when on Bluetooth) on my second gen X when I got the Marshmallow upgrade (with no warning) I’m done with Lenovo.

    • SoM
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] all these laptops is that they are available with a "Signature Edition" of Windows 10 Professional which contains no trialware or unwanted apps[/quote<] but we'll include our own junk anyways

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    They finally listened: A laptop that’s chunky with a phenomenal 21H battery life!

    Yay! 🙂

    Seriously, the ThinkPad X270 is under 3lbs and you can get it with a 1366×768 [b]IPS[b] screen. That’s actually a decent resolution considering it’s only 12.5″ and native resolution will actually look crisp without the screwup of windows dpi scaling required.

    1TB NVMe storage, 16GB RAM? Man, assuming these don’t royally suck I think I’ve found a new fleet laptop for the VPN road warriors.

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      BIOS backdoors included, no extra charge!

        • blastdoor
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah…. tradeoffs, I guess 🙁

        • dodozoid
        • 3 years ago

        Those were on consumer laptops, not ThinkPads if I remember it correctly

          • srg86
          • 3 years ago

          Yep the same old mistake (by commenters) gets pulled out again and again, the business grade Thinkpads indeed didn’t have these issues.

          Agreed they were stupid things to do, but they were only on the consumer line.

        • psuedonymous
        • 3 years ago

        Wrong product line: Superfish, BIOS sillyness, etc were all confined to Lenovo’s shitty consumer laptops. None of that made its way to the business lines (Thinkpad/Thinkstation).

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      1080p on X250/270 is actually fine (glare on the touch layer being the biggest issue). Now, regarding the dpi scaling – this is another reason to hate MS besides all the privacy concerns abound in W10 (even their software – MSO 2013 – looks like garbage). The fix I’ve found is to set custom scaling – when you open the control panel applet it’s originally set to 125, set it to custom 100 (likely anything), log off/log back in for changes to take effect. Stuff will look too small, go back to the same place, set it back to “custom” 125 (as it’d been before), log off/log back in for changes to take effect. Everything is sized right and the “legacy apps” look sharp while content remains legible without magnifying glass. Thanks MS for screwing another thing.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        I think I’m in the minority in hating scaling at anything other than 100%. Sure, 1080p is fine at 12.5″ if you scale, but by that standard, any resolution is fine at any size. [i<]Without scaling[/i<], 1080p@12.5" is a fairly squinty/uncomfortable at ~180ppi; Ideally you want ~100 for desktop usage, and maybe [b<]up to[/b<] 150ppi at the very most for laptops that you are closer to. Then again, we're a design studio working with a lot of artists and raster images are a huge proportion of the work we do. Honestly, 100% or 200% or GTFO is how I feel about it. Even if Microsoft managed to make everything about Windows and their own software look great with dpi scaling (and like you said, they're still a very long way off that optimistic goal after almost a decade of trying), there's a vast majority of other applications and browsers that don't scale well at all!

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Gasp… does that X270 have a wired Ethernet jack?

    It’s like a coelacanth crapped a rainbow in my brain!

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      I am trying to imagine that scenario–and can’t. But I’d pay to see it!

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]I am trying to imagine that scenario--and can't.[/quote<] I know, it's almost impossible to imagine a notebook made in the last 5 years that has a real Ethernet jack. [quote<]But I'd pay to see it![/quote<] Get your pre-order in with Lenovo then!

      • moop2000
      • 3 years ago

      The T470s ships with a wired ethernet jack as well.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      Having real network interface on x250 was good enough reason not to “upgrade” to y260 mutant. Now the screen on t460 (and I guess t470) is nice – touch gimmickry not getting in the way (=matte screen) is always a plus (when non-touch is not an option because committee decided so).

      • failquail
      • 3 years ago

      Bar Apple laptops, i cannot recall seeing many laptops at all that lack ethernet ports.

      Seems only the ‘thinness at any cost’ types have this issue. 🙂

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