Dell’s new 8K monitor is $4,999 of awesome

When I got my first 1080p monitor, I felt like I had so much room for activities. How could you ever need more space than that? Now, Dell is offering up 16 times more pixels with its new UP3218K display, the company's first 8K screen—and probably one of first on the market.

Aside from the almost unbelievable 7680×4320 resolution, the UP3218K sports a pretty impressive look and set of specs. Dell says the 10-bit display covers 100% of the Rec.701, sRGB and Adobe RGB color gamuts, and that matches up with the audience it's aiming for. Professionals in visual industries like design, architecture, and video editors working with 8K raw footage will be able to take advantage of this screen. Gamers, on the other hand, will want to wait—and not just because this display is incredibly expensive.

Product manager Michael Turner acknowledged flat-out that 8K gaming "is not practical, not yet," when speaking to PC World. The current batch of GPUs might be able to draw 8K images, but they take their time doing it. Turner implied that the next geneartion of GPUs, based on Nvidia's Volta and AMD's Vega archictures, might be able to handle the high resolution much more deftly.

The display offers a pair of DisplayPort 1.2 ports on the back, and that's it. HDMI 2.1, which brings proper 8K support to HDMI, was only just announced at CES 2017 and won't be on the market until later this year. The display also packs four USB 3.0 ports. The aluminum build, small bezel around the four sides, and the ability to adjust both angle and height all make sure the monitor is as attractive and flexible as anything else on the market.

Dell says the display will ship in limited quantities on March 23, and the cost is almost as high as the resolution: $4,999.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Can’t wait for 512K monitors to come out. /s

      • meerkt
      • 3 years ago

      Waiting for 640K.

      • demani
      • 3 years ago

      Nobody will ever need more than 64K.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    This release is a bit sparse on details. I’m still dubious if 8K matters at all for anything. 4K seems the point of diminishing returns. Can’t imagine seeing a dif between 4K and 8K on a 32″ monitor. Now if it was 40″ we could start having a conversation… maybe. and only for a very niche market.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    This monitor it meant purely for professionals that need as much screen resolution as possible (medical imaging, engineering firms and certain scientific lab work)

    8K makes no sense for [b<]computer monitors[/b<] for media consumption. 4K is already running towards the limits of human visual acuity on small screens a.k.a computer monitors. 8K only begins to make sense for media consumption on large displays (40"+) and the benefits are much more apparent with huge displays (70"+).

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 3 years ago

      …or you can just say that you are not impressed?

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      This will follow the same acceptance curve at 4K did a few years ago: professional usage at first with professional prices. Then a few companies offering ‘value’ displays to drop prices down. GPU manufacturers will start using this as the new benchmark resolution as when they’re able to provide adequate 4K performance.

      I would argue that 8K does make sense on large displays, mainly for high DPI modes for vector based items (text rendering etc.) while the majority of the content would remain 4K. I have a laptop with a 15″ 4K display and it is surprisingly good for those mundane things. For example, subtle differences like serif vs. san serif versions of a font are sharp and easy to distinguish at a glance.

    • Tristan
    • 3 years ago

    Dell state that ‘starting at 4.999’. So they may add other variants with HDR for 8K$

    • Tristan
    • 3 years ago

    what happened to their awesome 4K OLED presented on previous CES ? M.I.A
    This is also probably to be another M.I.A, as there are none volume 8K panels, only few experimental prototypes

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      Sharp has been manufacturing an 8K panel since July I believe. The catch is that no one was shipping a display as the display controllers weren’t availible in volume until recently. There were rumors that Apple would build their own display controller and utilize this panel for an 8K iMac at the end of 2016.

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    Any word on the refresh rate and color depth? With dual DP 1.2 inputs, it would be limited to 30 Hz.

    Also has it been double checked that the inputs are only DP 1.2? With dual DP 1.3, it could be driven at 60 Hz at 10 bit per channel. A single DP 1.3 port should also be able to drive this at 30 Hz with the full color gamut and 60 Hz with loss of some chroma. Due to the color depth and the refresh rate limitations, it does make sense to have a second DP input as well as supporting both DP 1.2 and DP 1.3 so that older video cards could at least drive this display.

      • Parallax
      • 3 years ago

      The linked article says 60Hz via 2 DP1.4[!] ports (not sure if both needed at once). Hopefully we see some GPUs with full DP1.4 support soon.

        • Krogoth
        • 3 years ago

        I believe it will first begin with professional-tier GPUs before customer-tier GPU get it.

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        Is DP Display Stream Compression really a flop then? It supposedly provides ~3x compression (so ~72 Hz for 8k@30bpp HDR over a single DP 1.4 link), but I’ve not heard about it being used in a single GPU or display/scaler yet.

          • Parallax
          • 3 years ago

          Hopefully. The potential for abuse made it a bad idea, and added lots of complexity when a little more bandwidth would have solved everything.

        • the
        • 3 years ago

        The Polaris and Pascal based GPUs are supposed to support DP 1.4 but I think that the issue for full compliance is that there were no monitors using display stream compression to test against.

        At the very least these GPUs do support the HBM3 from DP 1.3 to drive these using an uncompressed data stream.

    • Stochastic
    • 3 years ago

    Sometimes I’m thankful I don’t have 20/20 vision. I honestly don’t know if I’d be able to tell the difference between a 4K and 8K display.

      • meerkt
      • 3 years ago

      You’d be unlikely to tell the difference even with 20/20. Unless you sit real close.

      On TVs, that is. On a 32″ computer monitor there’s likely benefit to more than 4K, but maybe 8K is more than needed.

    • danny e.
    • 3 years ago

    Not to rain on any parades.. but I’ll believe it when I see it.

    They STILL have not delivered on their OLED based UP3017Q that was announced Jan 2016

    [url<]http://www.pcworld.com/article/3018710/hardware/dell-unveils-stunning-4k-oled-ultrasharp-display-and-declares-war-on-bezels.html[/url<] Edit: Also, I'd rather have the UP3017Q get delivered. [url<]https://www.monitornerds.com/dell-up3017q-review-120hz-oled-4k-monitor/[/url<] It sucks to have "reviews" for unreleased product.

      • ChicagoDave
      • 3 years ago

      You have to remember that Dell doesn’t actually manufacture their own panels, whether LCD/IPS or OLED. They’re entirely at the whim of the actual panel manufacturers, and at this point only LG is really going forward with OLED for consumers *now*. All of the other panel manufacturers are sticking to IPS improvements like Quantum Dots or IGZO. There was a new one in the news like two weeks ago where they were essentially layering a second LCD screen on top of the first, which then modulated light output on a pixel basis for HDR I think.

      The article mentions Sharp (panel mfg) has demonstrated an 8k display, so I’m guessing Dell is buying the panels from them. These things are sold primarily for the medical field (think MRI scans) where money is no object and maximum resolution is a must.

        • demani
        • 3 years ago

        Sony did just announce an OLED consumer display. So finally we may have some competition.

    • gmskking
    • 3 years ago

    Only $4,999?!

      • Ninjitsu
      • 3 years ago

      Adding another $ would have made it look too expensive, see.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    8k?….on a 32″ screen?…. why?

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      To serve as a hidpi replacement for all of the 32″ 4K monitors out there.

      I don’t know why everyone always goes, “But everything would be too small at that size!”

      Some of these monitors are meant to be run in a hidpi pixel doubled (or tripled) setup. That’s why you see 24″ 4k monitors on desktops or 14″ 3200×1800 monitors on laptops. If you run these monitors at a “standard” dpi, then you’re doing it wrong.

      • floodo1
      • 3 years ago

      I wonder what this monitor at arms reach is equivalent to in terms of a mobile device held much closer to your eyes? The mobile device would need higher PPI but some mobile devices are over 400 pixels per inch (and I think this thing is closer to 260)

      • meerkt
      • 3 years ago

      Not sure. But if it reaches the general public, it will be like cellphones: to lure the uneducated with larger numbers.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Yes, but if you buy the Freesync version it’s only $199.

      • rudimentary_lathe
      • 3 years ago

      I was totally going to buy this monitor, but no FreeSync? Come on now. Without Freesync, how could I enjoy my 1fps gaming experience without screen tearing?

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