Gigabyte aims a shrink ray at GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti

Nvidia's GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti graphics cards pack a lot of graphics punch into a small power envelope. Not to be outdone by MSI, Gigabyte is now capitalizing on those cards' low thermal and power footprint by packing them into half-height PCIe cards. The Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 OC Low Profile 2G and GTX 1050 Ti OC Low Profile 4G cards can transform a pre-built desktop or SFF machine into a very capable gaming and media playback platform. The cards don't need a six-pin PCIe power connector, so owners of small systems should be able to plunk these cards in without a PSU upgrade.

Gigabyte's miniaturized GeForce GTX 1050 has a base clock of 1366 MHz and a boost clock of 1468 MHz—a handful of MHz faster than the GTX 1050 reference specifications. The mighty mite GTX 1050 Ti has a base clock of 1303 MHz and a boost clock of 1417 MHz, also just a bit faster than reference spec. Both cards have GDDR5 memory clocked at 7 GT/s. The GTX 1050 card has 2GB of onboard memory, while the Ti version doubles that capacity.

Both cards use the half-height form factor, but they still have dual-slot coolers. Each card has a pair of HDMI ports, a DiplayPort jack, and an old-school DVI-D connector. Physical measurements are 6.6" x 2.7" x 1.5" (or 16.7 cm x 6.9 cm x 3.7 cm), no matter which card buyers choose.

Gigabyte didn't offer pricing information for the GeForce GTX 1050 OC Low Profile 2G and GTX 1050 Ti OC Low Profile 4G,  but these mini-me cards tend to go for few bucks more than their full-size equivalents. For reference, MSI's half-height GeForce GTX 1050 Ti card sells for $155 at Newegg, while that manufacturer's least expensive GeForce GTX 1050 Ti implementation goes for $150.

Comments closed
    • Nomgle
    • 3 years ago

    Forum thread is [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=94408[/url<] if anyone else is looking for a decent low-profile card !

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    Drop this in a refurb business SFF, plug in a FLIC and you have a decent HTPC with mild gaming chops for about $325 USD.

      • llisandro
      • 3 years ago

      one problem is that at least on Dell (*020 series and the like), the x16 slot is at the very bottom with an x1 above, so there isn’t room for a double-width card 🙁

        • Lord.Blue
        • 3 years ago

        That’s what dremels are for…

      • mikepers
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve had that thought as well. Maybe something like these:

      3rd gen i3 with 8GB for $219:
      [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883798878&ignorebbr=1[/url<] 3rd gen i5 quad - 4GB for $231: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883797415&ignorebbr=1[/url<] 3rd gen i5 quad - 8GB for $249: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883795783&ignorebbr=1[/url<] All have Win10 pro included. Slap in a card like the ones here and they would make a decent PC for not that much money. My only concern is the odd size power supply if you ever had to replace it. Thought there is a 3rd gen i5 quad 4GB tower for $235: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883797473&ignorebbr=1[/url<]

      • Concupiscence
      • 3 years ago

      “Mild”? The 1050 Ti’s nearly as fast as a Radeon 7970 and sips power, and the vanilla 1050 will wallop a 750 Ti by a cozy margin. Assuming it don’t throttle like crazy in a small case, the Ti will manage medium or high details in newer titles at 1080p. I’ll agree that it’s not without the possibility of compromises, but [i<]mild[/i<] is not the word that came to mind reading this article. Good on Gigabyte for making these.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    I had a 45W TDP [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102874<]AMD 5570 low profile single slot GPU[/url<] back in the day that was whisper quiet. These cards are 75W TDP, so I wonder how quiet that same size fan is running even given the dual slot heatsink.

      • Topinio
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, sadly there are no more dGPU’s in that power bracket anymore. I guess it’s because they’d be performing at a similar level to high-end iGP’s, but I can’t help feel that NVIDIA and AMD are missing a trick.

      Sure I’m wrong and they’ve both done the analysis, but it just seems that there are plenty of systems which have older or lower-tier iGP’s.

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        I think you’re right about the sub-75W TDP comment. Once you go below that level of performance (currently) the difference between a dGPU and IGP narrows to the point of irrelevancy. I owned my 5570 back when onboard graphics were REALLY awful or non-existent, and if you wanted to play even the lightest games, you needed a dGPU.

        I think that given price parity, I’d go with MSI’s dual fan low-profile cards, less likely for those little fans to be screamin’

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      I’m hesitant to call the vanilla 1050 a 75W part in the real world, given that the timing of this coincides with the mobile 1050 and 1050Ti launches, and the mobile 1050Ti is a sub-75W part running at vastly higher clocks (up to 1620MHz) and that’s with all 6 of the GP107’s SMPs active.

      The vanilla 1050 only has to run 5 SMPs at 1354MHz to qualify so I’d hope that the reduced clocks and the disabled logic are good for at least a 15W power reduction over the 1050Ti’s upper limit of 75W.

      Conjecture, I know – but in the absence of power consumption testing by hardware sites, we’re not going to get anything better for now.

        • Topinio
        • 3 years ago

        A lot of 1050’s have a bit of an OC to take them close to the power ceiling. Doesn’t look to be much headroom, guess the laptop chips could be cherry-picked.

        [url<]https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GTX_1050_Gaming_X/25.html[/url<] [url<]http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1050-ti,4787-6.html[/url<]

        • Concupiscence
        • 3 years ago

        In addition to the reduced clocks and disabled logic, the 1050’s also being fed by half as much RAM. Cumulatively that has to add up.

        • HERETIC
        • 3 years ago

        “Conjecture, I know – but in the absence of power consumption testing by hardware sites,”
        TPU has them listed at 54W and 57W during gaming. OC models can go as high as 100W
        [url<]https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GTX_1050_Ti_Strix_OC/27.html[/url<] As to Abrasions earlier post- These cards sip power for multi monitor-listed 7W with 2 monitors. If you find a model that fan is off at low temps-Underclock/restrict clock speed. You end up with a silent low power card for non gaming applications..........

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          Awesome, good find.

          I’m also super pleased at my “at least 15W less than stated” guess. That also bodes well for the laptop parts being cherry-picked and configurable down to 45W.

            • HERETIC
            • 3 years ago

            If lappies allow the same control as desktop parts you may be able to configure as low as 34W.
            or even lower.
            [url<]http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-gtx-1050-ti-passive-cooling-mod,4837.html#p2[/url<] What I liked in that article was the 21% performance loss at 60% power usage. Somewhere between there and full is a sweet spot...........................................

          • renz496
          • 3 years ago

          AFAIK pretty much every 1050ti on the market including the factory overclocked model were limited to draw 75w only. that asus strix was the only exception where asus remove the “limiter” and allow the card to draw as much power as possible for overclocking purpose.

    • Shinare
    • 3 years ago

    Any mention of an actual half-height bracket? I’m not seeing one on the website links. T’would be a pitty if they didn’t come with one.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      I would hope both Gigabyte and MSI are including low-profile brackets in the box. Otherwise it would defeat the purpose of a low-profile card.

        • Shinare
        • 3 years ago

        You know what they say about when you assume something… 🙂

          • Shobai
          • 3 years ago

          No, I don’t.

          =P

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        It really wouldn’t be the first or the last time Gigabyte and MSI have defeated the purpose of their own products.

        • Lord.Blue
        • 3 years ago

        I do know that the MSI versions come with both. Not sure about the Gigabyte.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      I came here to ask that question.

      I have been burned too many times. The only reason someone would purchase this over a larger, better-cooled 1050 variant is because it’s half-height.

      It’s bad enough that the full-size bracket it fitted and pictured by default for a “low profile” product, but I’ve been burned countless times by products that say low-profile and then don’t include the bracket. Sadly, many stores don’t even list if the low-profile bracket is included or not, which doesn’t help.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        In this case, the product pages don’t have that information, either.

          • Klimax
          • 3 years ago

          Based on image estimation (about five DP/HDMI can fit side-by-side) I am getting ~70mm.

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            Nonononono, the pictured bracket is normal height. We’re talking about the half-height bracket that is sometimes (but not always supplied in the box) for use with low-profile cases.

            To clarify, the sole point of this card being shorter than the bracket is so that you can swap it out for the low-profile bracket and fit it in a low-profile case.

            [url=http://en.community.dell.com/cfs-file/__key/communityserver-discussions-components-files/3513/3884.bracket.jpg<]This explains the two sizes nicely[/url<].

            • Klimax
            • 3 years ago

            Ehm, I know difference. I measured it against full-height bracket on one of many cards I have around. 70mm is not full-height. (BTW: If at least you’d link to image with sizes…)

            per quick search:
            [url<]http://digital.ni.com/public.nsf/allkb/016489CD8467390A86256FF5005A92D2[/url<] Card as pictured would fit half-height. BTW: It just looks odd. It doesn't even look like full-height. (too few vent holes)

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            It’ll just be an optical illusion; There are [b<]only[/b<] two expansion slot sizes that I'm aware of, and I've been working with consumer and server hardware since floppy disks were actually floppy.

            • Klimax
            • 3 years ago

            I know there are only two types of brackets, but I screwed up initial estimate. (Underestimated spaces between ports)

            Nothing to see here, move along…

      • Bauxite
      • 3 years ago

      They do, which you will see when these show up sites like newegg that take extra product pictures.

      Every single [b<]retail[/b<] release of HH cards from these OEMs and similar has included the bracket. Not just gpus either, but key word is [b<]retail[/b<].

    • firewired
    • 3 years ago

    Not bad, but I would like to see more single-slot designs in this price bracket.

    GPU’s in these price ranges run cooler due to generally lower clock speeds and/or fewer GPU resources generating power and heat. They use tiny fans anyway and the single-slot design should be just as efficient as a dual-slot but more flexible for after-market purposes.

    The perfect example of this would be the ~5 year old Powercolor Radeon 7750’s that had a single-slot standard-height design. I had a few of these and they were fabulous. A more modern GPU on the same PCB and I would be sold multiple times over.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      [url<]https://techreport.com/news/31028/xfx-rx-460-core-slims-down-to-a-single-slot[/url<]

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This