Report: Dell UP3017Q OLED monitor has been canned

Remember that fancy Dell OLED monitor? According to Francophone tech site les Numériques, it won't be seeing the light of day. The site says it spoke with Dell personnel at CES, and that it was told the UP3017Q was canceled due to unresolvable image quality problems. Specifically, according to les Numériques, the issue was color drift when viewing the monitor off-angle.

The cancellation isn't all that surprising. The UP3017Q was first shown over a year ago at CES 2016, and nary a peep has been heard about it since. The scarcity of OLED TVs and monitors appears to indicate that there still may be some technical challenges to contend with in those arenas, something that gerbils in our forums were quick to point out. Still, it's always sad to see a new product fail to hit the market—especially one this cool.

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    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    what is the difference between OLED of the past decade and the QLED that is supposed to be rolling out in 2018?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      “QLED” is [i<]not[/i<] an LED display just like the "LED" displays you see at Best Buy aren't really LED displays. These displays are just LCDs that use LED light sources instead of the older compact flourescent light sources. The quantum dots -- at least as used in practical displays -- serve as an improved light source that can produce a much purer white light output compared to conventional LED light sources. The standard LCD elements then filter this improved white light to produce a higher quality output. Additionally, since the quantum dots are arranged in a big array accross the TV instead of being a single bar light, the LCD TV should in theory be able to reproduce blacks better than a conventional LCD.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 3 years ago

        so the QLED will still separate the panel from the backlight while OLED has the pixel as self illuminating.

    • TwoEars
    • 3 years ago

    Makes me wonder how those Thinkpad and Alienware oled laptops will fare..

    • Wirko
    • 3 years ago

    All that’s missing in OLED monitors is per-pixel calibration or per-pixel reverse burn-in once a year. The latter could be performed automatically every day if TVs had usage counters for every (sub)pixel. Will be invented, maybe as soon as 2018.

      • mcnabney
      • 3 years ago

      Uhm no. All of the sub pixels deteriorate fairly quickly, however the blue pixels at a far higher rate. What you are talking about is a perpetual calibration – which only accelerate the erosion of the blue pixels. I guess that might work for phones you replace every two years, but most of us keep our monitor well over five years and have it on many more hours a day.

        • Wirko
        • 3 years ago

        You can’t counter the decay but you can make all pixels equally bad, which is much better than nothing.

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 3 years ago

    At last! Err, oh wait.. I guess not yet.

    • Billstevens
    • 3 years ago

    Its shame OLED tech is so hard to get right.

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 3 years ago

    Does anyone know how LG is getting around burn-in issues with their OLED TVs, such as a news ticker? I’m also curious as to whether they have any plans to bring their OLED technology to the monitor space.

      • stdRaichu
      • 3 years ago

      LG are pretty much the only game in town for OLED so chances are this Dell monitor would have been using an LG panel.

      Pretty sure there’s no real “getting around” it; their current panels are rated for a 100,000hr lifetime but it’s basically a measure of half-life, after 50,000hrs they’re at 50% brightness (and different colours degrade at slightly different rates so you get an accompanying colour shift as well). Personally I’m waiting OLED out for a few more years to see how these potential issues get tackled – loss of brightness I can live with but wonky colour gives me a nervous tic.

        • Wirko
        • 3 years ago

        Is that hours of use or total (on+off) time?

        • rudimentary_lathe
        • 3 years ago

        I think I read a comment here yesterday on another story that said the LG OLED panels are using WOLED technology – that is, all the pixels emit white light only, and that light passes through a film that determines the colour. So assuming nothing happens to the film’s performance over time, I’d think the colours should deteriorate at the same rate.

        50,000 hours is 8.5 years. I’d be totally fine with that. I usually have my monitors set to below 50% brightness anyways.

        Really curious what’s keeping this technology from the monitor space when it’s having so much success in TVs.

        • Jigar
        • 3 years ago

        Even if i use OLED for 8 hours a day daily, it would take 17 years to complete 50,000 hrs. I can’t complain to that.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 years ago

          The issue isn’t the total lifespan of the pixels, the issue is two pixels next to each other deteriorating at different rates.
          If they can get to a point where the pixels only drop to say, 99% brightness after 50000 hours, the deterioration would be negligible enough to not matter.
          So long as one pixel can drop by more than a couple of percent compared to a neighbouring pixel, there’ll be serious burn-in issues. Overall brightness is no big deal, but it’s very easy to pick up differences in relative brightness.

      • Dr_Gigolo
      • 3 years ago

      I personally have the LG B6V that came out last year and that is currently being raved pretty much everywhere right now.

      There is no burn-in, however, there is some image retention that can sit there for a few minutes of there is the same static image for a very long time (although I have yet to see it myself). The TV alleviates image retention by using a feature called Pixel Shift, where it moves the picture a little to the left and then a little to the right (or something like that). It does this with certain intervals. If you pay very close attention, you may notice it happening (personally I have noticed it once).

      The other feature it has, is that after the TV has been turned for 4 hours, it will cycle all the pixels. Like a clean up. So if you had image retention before turning the TV off, it will be gone when you turn it on again, as long as it is more than 4-5 hours after you last turned it off. You can also initiate a cycle like this from the menu, manually. However, it takes about an hour to complete.

      I got my TV exactly one month ago, and couldn’t be happier. I was one of those guys who loved plasma and had 3 different models from 2005 untill 2013 when I moved into an apartment with large ass windows and a lot of reflections from the neighbours bright white building, resulting in an extremely bright apartment, where the Plasma’s brightness just didn’t cut it.

      Having gone to a LCD with IPS tech, I hated the non-uniform backlight where every solid colour had a lot of inconsistencies and lets not forget the black levels. This TV just brings it all back together. No more inconsistent back light, no more un-uniform colours. Everything is just like you would expect a high quality TV to be. Perect viewing angles and black levels to kill for.

      A lot of LCD evangelists are calling the brightness on these OLED’s. Sure, they don’t reach 1000nits yet. Yes, that is true, but most people will still be watching REC709 for the majority of time, and there the brightness is blinding.

      I played Wither 3 in 4K this weekend by hooking up my desktop PC. Albeit, the TV doesn’t have G-sync, and I couldn’t lock in 60 fps, even with my GTX 1080, so the framerate stuttered a bit, but damn. Going back to my ROG PG279Q was a biiig disappointment. The colours looked washed out by comparison. Like there suddenly was a veil over the monitor.

      It’s too bad we don’t have PC monitors with OLED yet. I want one, and I won’t pay 2000 dollars to get the new ROG monitor with 4K, Gsync, HDR and FALD. That’s more than what I payed for mye LG TV.

      • psuedonymous
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Does anyone know how LG is getting around burn-in issues with their OLED TVs[/quote<] They use the WOLED process. Instead of fabbing separate red, green and blue subpixels using purely red, green and blue emitting mixes, they instead make every subpixel a white emitting subpixel using a mixed emitter. They then layer red, green and blue filters over this to create the primary subpixels. Downside is, you lose 60% of your emitted light, so efficiency takes a dip (though still beats LCD). Upside is, all subpixels degrade at the same rate, so there is no colour shift. And because there is only one chemical deposition pass, there are fewer opportunities for defects to occur, so yield is higher.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Both my OLED phones were beautiful when new, and both suffered burn-in (actually, burn-out of the blue OLEDs)

    OLED is the solution that is perpetually hampered by this issue, it has been “almost ready” for a decade now and as far as I can tell, there has been no real progress.

      • Magic Hate Ball
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, I had the Nexus 6 which used AMOLED and after about 9 months I could see faint burn in where the menu buttons persisted.

      And that’s only 1-2 hours of screen time a day.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 3 years ago

        I still have a Nexus 6 and use it for many hours a day for quite awhile now and there is 0 burn in whatsoever. I’m the kind of person who gets annoyed from a single dead pixel so I’d be pretty sure I’d notice this. I’ve never seen burn in on OLED even from some of my ancient small devices with 1inch displays that used the early tech. Actually the only thing I ever saw burn in on were kiosk CRTs.

      • jihadjoe
      • 3 years ago

      Samsung actually did things right with their Pentile layout and button bar. The blue (and red) subpixels are larger to compensate for eventual wear, and the button bar means the bottom of the screen doesn’t get burned out from displaying the home buttons.

    • ludi
    • 3 years ago

    My long-lasting OLED monitor will be powered by low-cost fusion energy. And it will run Crysis…in glorious 16K resolution.

    • NTMBK
    • 3 years ago

    Too beautiful for this world.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Wow. I can’t believe Dell canceled a monitor model. Big news indeed!!

      • CheetoPet
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t worry, they will have a new OLED model on display at CES 2018 with a release date of March 2018 which will then proceed to slip sometime into 2019. Wash, rinse, repeat.

    • Tristan
    • 3 years ago

    imo, these drifts come rather from burn-in than angles. OLED is weak tech, doubt if it be ever general replacement for LCD. QLED may be better.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Anybody who has ever used a phone with an OLED display and a static UI widget of some kind (like a notification pull-down) knows this to be true. I had some pretty substantial burn-in on my HTC One S (used around 18 mos) and my Galaxy S4 (used for about 2 years) both. I don’t want to replace a monitor that frequently.

        • sreams
        • 3 years ago

        “Anybody who has ever used a phone with an OLED display and a static UI widget of some kind (like a notification pull-down) knows this to be true.”

        Indeed. Search your feelings.

        • meerkt
        • 3 years ago

        Samsung phones probably use their own OLEDs. LG’s may be different. Also, it’s still an evolving technology.

        According to Rtings retention is not permanent, though I don’t know how long they leave stuff on to burn. For example: [url<]http://ca.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/e6[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Whenever I think of OLED’s I’m reminded of the old phrase: The future will be better tomorrow!

      • JAMF
      • 3 years ago

      Shame that ‘the furture’ is on 55″ and higher TV, 6″ or lower smartphone, a few 9.7″/12″ tablets and one 14″(?) laptop… but not on the 27-32″ monitor market. Oh, and in VR headsets.

      Maybe there’s a bunch of cheap 5.7″ 2560×1440 touchscreens going on the cheap, which can be glued together and hacked into a nice screen? 🙂

        • Tristan
        • 3 years ago

        it is not about size, but OLED material durability. This tech can’t withstand static images displayed for long periods of time.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        No way I’d buy an OLED TV until burn-in is solved (edit: sufficiently stifled so that it’s not noticeably burning out inside of two years).

          • nico1982
          • 3 years ago

          [url<]http://televisions.reviewed.com/features/what-to-know-about-oled-screen-burn-in-problems-causes-image-retention[/url<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            I don’t use my TV like a “normal” TV. Almost everything I do on a TV is gaming-related, and so there will almost always be static elements. That just doesn’t apply to my usage patterns.

            And now Dell is working on something that will absolutely show static elements almost all the time. The Windows taskbar isn’t going anywhere.

      • rwburnham
      • 3 years ago

      Thank you, Dan Quayle!

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