Rumor: AMD Ryzen CPUs to launch before March 3

AMD has a lot riding on Ryzen. The company's CPUs and SoCs haven't been able to compete with the performance of Intel's mainstream desktop offerings in most workloads for some time, and competition with the blue team's high-end desktop and server chips has been further out of the question. To say that the red team has a lot riding on Ryzen would be something of an understatement. Anandtech reports that the description of a presentation that AMD will give at the Game Developer Conference gives away a launch date some time before the end of of the conference on March 3.

GDC is scheduled to begin on February 27 and end on March 3. Anandtech has a screen capture of the presentation description that reads, in part: "Join AMD Game Engineering team members for an introduction to the recently-launched AMD Ryzen CPU followed by advanced optimization topics." The page has since been altered to remove the phrase "recently launched." If Ryzen CPUs do in fact launch before March 3, the launch will have taken place well in advance of the end of AMD's first fiscal quarter at the end of March.

AMD fans and anyone looking to put together a machine for content creation has been looking forward to the new chip's launch ever since the company first put the new architecture on its roadmap back in mid-2015. AMD CEO Lisa Su has been promising a Q1 2017 launch for chips based on the Zen architecture since an announcement in the shadow of the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco in August.

Comments closed
    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    I wouldn’t read too much into this. It is entirely possible that the expected release date slipped after the original slide was prepared.

    I do have my fingers crossed though. (Both for the launch date and for it to meet expectations in terms of performance and power usage.)

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      I think the release date has been quietly slipping. Wasn’t it originally supposed to be out in 2016? Then I think it became early Q1 and now we don’t even have a firm launch date, no firm info on the lineup, no firm pricing info, no die shots, just a few pretty slides and that New Horyzen event. Reminds me of the dearth of info from the incoming Trump administration regarding how they plan to make America great again this close to his inauguration.

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        Make AMD Great Again!

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 3 years ago

        AMD has a good shot at basic competency this time around, but lets not set [i<]too[/i<] high of expectations for them. It will be astonishing to me if they can hit the IPC, clockspeed, efficiency, price and volumes that people are talking about any time in the first half of 2017.

    • Lordhawkwind
    • 3 years ago

    I really have thought a lot about Ryzen but I’m 99% certain on getting a new 7600k, Asus B250 Prime mobo and 16gb DDR4 ram for about £440. Ryzen is a new architecture new chipset new socket new everything and ATM I’m looking for an upgrade that works out of the box, OC’s well and Kaby Lake seems to fit my bill. I basically use my Windows PC to game so can’t really see the need for 8/16 Ryzen or even 4/8 i7. I will also hopefully be pairing it up with a Vega GPU if it’s performance matches up to replace my Fury Pro. Bring it on!

      • 1sh
      • 3 years ago

      Some games do benefit from more than 4 cores. So a >4 core cpu will be more future proof.

        • travbrad
        • 3 years ago

        People said the same thing when Bulldozer came out, and those benefits never really showed up. Obviously Ryzen will have a lot better IPC and a more balanced design so it shouldn’t suffer so badly in games, but I still doubt it will be able to match Kaby Lake.

        It could be a good chip for people who do a mix of gaming and heavily-threaded stuff though, or if they offer some cheaper SKUs/models than Intel has, especially for overclockers since Intel locks down most of their CPUs. I would hope a 4/8 Ryzen can beat Intel’s new $180 unlocked i3, for example.

          • 1sh
          • 3 years ago

          In a game that places a significant load on 4 cores, I am sure a 4/8 Ryzen will beat a i3 2/4.

          But there are games that only place a significant load on 2 cores which is where the new i3 will most likely win.

          • kuttan
          • 3 years ago

          Some 10 years ago people said Duel core Core 2 Duo E8500 was a better CPU over Core 2 Quad Q6600 for gaming due to E8500 high clocks. That initial advantage with E8500 vaporized withing a year or two when games started using more than 2 cores back then. Today is no different either having more than 4 cores CPU in 2017 is a plus point for future proofing.

            • chuckula
            • 3 years ago

            Right now a dual core i3 is clearly better than an 8 core FX-8370 in the vast majority of games, and that was before the unlocked i3 7350K @ 5GHz launched.

      • tay
      • 3 years ago

      What are you updating from? Curious.

    • unclesharkey
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder how quickly AMD will phase out the old FX processors?

      • Vhalidictes
      • 3 years ago

      Are any still selling now?

        • ozzuneoj
        • 3 years ago

        There are still people buying AMD FX because they look at clock speed and core count, rather than looking at reviews.

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        I imagine there are a few types of users still buying them:

        1. People who have a first-gen Bulldozer core CPU and are upgrading to an FX-8350 or FX-8370 as a last gasp upgrade because they plan to hang on to their existing system for a while yet.

        2. People who have a use case that can effectively leverage the 8 cores, are building on the cheap, and don’t mind the power/heat.

        3. People who want to throw together a cheap server with ECC support.

        4. People who don’t realize it’s a CPU with sub-par performance/watt on an outdated dead-end platform, and (as ozzuneoj says) are buying based on clock frequency.

        All of that said, in spite of being pretty affordable, I think the FX CPUs are rather overpriced these days for what they are, and don’t represent a good long-term value for most people. I would’ve expected larger price drops by now, especially with Ryzen about to launch. Either supply is already getting thin (justifying keeping prices near historical levels in spite of low demand), or there’s going to be a lot of unsold stock of FX CPUs a few months down the road. The latter scenario could conceivably make for some halfway decent deals if mobo vendors do a fire sale clearance of their remaining AM3+ boards and you can live with the outdated platform…

          • DrDominodog51
          • 3 years ago

          5. Extreme overclockers who want to hit 8 Ghz on liquid nitrogen.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 3 years ago

      It’s probably going to take a year for all the crappy A-series APUs down the line to be replaced.

        • MOSFET
        • 3 years ago

        Newgg was trying to sell a lot Trinity APUs on Black Friday weekend. This surprised me (well, only a little) since I realized it’s been 3.5 years since I bought a couple of Richlands (which are still in use as reasonably low-power office systems. The one with no dGPU and one SSD idles at 25W, an A8-6500 65W TDP APU. The other is a 100W A8-6600K which OC’s well.))

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Technically Vishera has been phased out for a while now, or should be. But of course since AMD has nothing to replace it with just yet it had to soldier on for years.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      It’ll take them a while since nobody wants them as it is.

    • Coran Fixx
    • 3 years ago

    What year?

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    i’m not really interested in extreme performance. i’m mainly interested in what they have to offer in comparison to the $250 mainstream 6700k.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 3 years ago

    Going by the all the leaks, I am optimistic and looking forward to this launch. Word of caution to the extreme-fanbois! Don’t expect miracles, instead expect a back to competitiveness. Competitiveness does not mean SkyLake killers but giving customers a reasonable alternative.

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    If the rumors we’ve been hearing are even remotely true, it sounds like the CPU itself should at least be competitive on the performance and performance/watt fronts. The big question marks are price/performance, and the quality of the other bits that make up the platform. If the native USB3 support sucks, or you need to buy a 3rd party HSF because the retail one is too loud, that effectively takes the price/performance down a notch or two because those represent added up-front costs.

      • adamwzl
      • 3 years ago

      Not necessarily, it only takes the extra cost away from the consumer intel chips. But all of x99 chips do not come with a HSF and are just the CPU themselves. By the looks of the info released so far on Ryzen it seems to be going after the broadwell x99 CPU’s. I’m sure their 4c/4T CPU’s will most likely incorporate a HSF option. But with their higher end offerings it will be similar to intel as majority of everyone uses their own cooling solution.

      • freebird
      • 3 years ago

      Because Intel’s CPU built-in USB3.x support is so good? oh wait, they don’t even have it…

        • just brew it!
        • 3 years ago

        At least Intel has chipsets that do it decently. The rumor that Zen’s USB3 support was designed by ASMedia does not inspire confidence.

          • anotherengineer
          • 3 years ago

          [url<]https://www.techpowerup.com/229594/intels-skylake-and-kaby-lake-based-systems-vulnerable-to-usb-exploit[/url<]

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      I would certainly hope that AMD plans to bundle the Wraith cooler with all of the Ryzen offerings, but maybe they won’t. TR found the Wraith to be [url=https://techreport.com/review/29691/amd-wraith-cpu-cooler-reviewed<]half-way decent[/url<].

      • Concupiscence
      • 3 years ago

      I think the Wraith solved the problem of janky coolers for AMD. It may not be the quietest HSF around, but it purrs instead of whines, and the noise level’s pretty invariant. But as you say, time will tell if they get the motherboard logic right…

    • Mat3
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]To say that the red team has a lot riding on Ryzen...[/quote<] Is AMD as a whole considered the "red" team?

      • nico1982
      • 3 years ago

      Shortly after the ATi buyout, I think? It is both unique and consistent. Intel is blue, AMD is red, Nvidia is green. Much better than having AMD green when talking about CPU and red if the subject are graphics.

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      well they’re consistently in the red

        • Dysthymia
        • 3 years ago

        Too real, Firestarter.

        • [+Duracell-]
        • 3 years ago

        Because they run red hot?

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 3 years ago

    Don’t we know somebody who works for AMD…?
    😉

    I’m like Ars Technica staff, I wanna believe and I want a compelling reason to buy too, but I’m not into giving to AMD as a charity, either.

    So back to my first statement, does AMD feel confident enough to start reviews before launch instead of parking everyone on a DAY 1 NDA?

    Also – if AMD is reading these comments, February 28th this year is Mardi Gras. And if they truly have a competitive CPU and chipset – I don’t need an Intel-killer, just a competitor – then please use the Fat Tuesday theme. Because if it is a dog and they’ve been fibbing to us, it will be Ash Wednesday for AMD.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      In general, NDAs ensure that everybody who receives a chip to review is on an even playing field with regard to information about the product and time to test it. It’s not about “AMD feeling confident enough” about the product to issue review samples, it’s about making sure that the press gets what it needs to publish the best reviews possible and that any errors discovered during the review process can be addressed.

      Contrast that with the recent spate of Core i7-7700K reviews that went up without all the details, and I think you’ll rather have that day one NDA lift.

    • gmskking
    • 3 years ago

    I was going to upgrade to Ryzen but not now if I have to wait 2 more months.

      • JAMF
      • 3 years ago

      You waited this long and can’t wait six or seven weeks? Go on then, buy it quick!!!

      😛 Smart Intel buyers will wait 6 or 7 weeks to see if their object(s) of desire drops in price.

      • nico1982
      • 3 years ago

      You wanted to upgrade to Ryzen before its launch? :S

    • not@home
    • 3 years ago

    Paper? Hopefully not.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Pricing.

    We have a rough idea of performance – we’ve seen SOME tests and we know it’s 40% better IPC than the current cores. Whether it beats or loses to Intel isn’t actually that important as long as it closes the huge gap that currently exists.

    So yeah, what matters is how much it’s going to cost. If 8C/16T is truly competitive with Intel’s $1100 6900K, I don’t think AMD are going to sell it for $300. They’re not a charity, they’re trying to make profit.

      • freebird
      • 3 years ago

      $500 for top end 8-core 95w+ OC TDP friendly FX edition
      $349 8-core 95w standard ed. OC capable but crap shoot on how much.
      $250-280 6-core 65w OC capable (may have more OC than $349 8-core standard)
      $175-200 4-core 65w.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Is that your speculation or do you have a source?

          • ptsant
          • 3 years ago

          I have heard the same rumors, obviously: $500 for a “special edition” part and $350 for the “base” model 8c16t.

          If the leaks we are seeing are legitimate, I think the $350 price point is very reasonable. It’s not going to beat the 7700K in single threaded, but the multi-threaded advantage gives it a reason to ask for the same amount.

          The $500 price point is an open question. If there is such a chip, it will have to bring sufficient added value. I would guess a special “wraith” cooler, maybe extra 100MHz and/or cherry picking. We know that all Ryzen are unlocked, so it can’t be that.

          I’d rather spend $200-250, but if the chip is as good as it seems, it probably won’t be priced that aggressively.

            • BaronMatrix
            • 3 years ago

            But the problem with that price is the mainstream quads won’t be worth anything…

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            Why should a mainstream quad be worth anything in particular? They won’t win on IPC, wattage, clockspeed, features or platform. Price is their selling point.

        • freebird
        • 3 years ago

        Since when in the past year does ANYONE need a source… the media doesn’t check anything before they print trash…
        but I digress..
        Shear speculation on my part, but since Rysen EE samples are running at 3.4 and 3.9-4.0Ghz Turbo for the 8-core 16thread and it being roughly comparable to the 6900K in performance tests.

        I would speculate that one AMD would like to sell a lot and sell them fast, since Revenue can then be rolled back into supporting Naples and Vega rollouts and next generations. They have opportunities but windows close fast in the tech industry, so they have to realize revenue quickly.

        I doubt there is a big market for the 6900K. So undercutting its price significantly seems most likely. That and I doubt Intel will match $500, but who knows.

        For ex. there may be only 100K people willing to spend $1000 for 6900K performance, but there may be 1Million people willing to spend $500 for the same performance, so it would behoove AMD to drop it in the sweet spot to maximize revenue specially near term.

        Not sure on where exactly some of the pricing or performance falls; I’m pretty sure Lisa Su mentioned a “performance” OC friendly version, which also implies a standard run of the mill version.

        So a 8-core/16 thread 95w 3.4Ghz – 4.0 Turbo seems to be the standard right now, from the latest EE samples, which should sell well in the $349-400 range, if comparable to 6900K.

        I see a FX OC friendly version then selling for $450-500.

        and pricing the 6-core and 4-cores depends on if they can speed bump them up much.

        Supposedly 6core will take on i5 and 4core i3, if so they need to be priced accordingly that also depends on how far out the 4 cpu zen APUs with Vega? cores later this year come out.

        Another dependency is yield and # of wafers they can process. If they can make more than they can sell at these prices then prices may drop…

        Thanks for playing how much money can we make on CPU performance xxx and yield yyy!!!

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 3 years ago

    RELEES DA COARZ!

    Hopefully by release they mean plenty of supply and meeting MSRPs right out of the gate. A soft launch in March would be extremely disappointing. I was hoping for later this month…

      • Welch
      • 3 years ago

      They have already been quoted about a soft/paper/white launch of Ryzen. They stated that they have done that in the past and weren’t going to play around like that this time. I believe it was Mark Papermaster who made the comments stating that Day 1 they will be available for purchase, not just pre-orders.

      I’d assume that is why we now have a Feb 28th release supposedly, it gave then Jan/Feb to actually get product into the hands of retailers. I’d assume that was the reasoning behind the full Zen (RyZen) detailed release at the dead start of January.

    • bfar
    • 3 years ago

    AMD seem pretty confident about these products. Here’s hoping they price these up against Z270 and Kabylake. That should give Intel something to smoke in their pipe.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Just release it already.

    • kvndoom
    • 3 years ago

    I want to believe!

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    I’ve said a lot of mean things about Zen and hope to eat my words.

      • freebird
      • 3 years ago

      Are those 8-bit ASCII or Double-byte Unicode words? It makes a difference you know… ;D

        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago

        it’s UTF-8 and you wouldn’t know until you get a crunchy bite

    • jts888
    • 3 years ago

    I’m nearly sold on Summit Ridge/Ryzen at this point, mostly since I’d like a fair number more int-heavy cores and don’t particularly need the AVX-crunching powers (or nontrivial expense) of a Broadwell-E. It’s also been a long while since I’ve cared about anything remotely in the “enthusiast” bracket, but the potential of decent overclocking with a solid motherboard power subsystem has me at least thinking on that front again.

    I’m looking forward greatly to the reviews!

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      I’m open to it, too, since I can utilize the cores and Intel has withheld all advancement on that front for years. We’ll see though, single thread performance can’t suck.

    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    Just launch it already so we can compare it with 7700K. I need an upgrade.

    I am more worried about VEGA. The new gen shaders with new gen memory are probably a hard challenge for the driver team. Launch performance could be a disappointment.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      I expect the Vega 10s to be competitive with GP104 silicon and have more future potential. GP102 cards are going to rule ultra high-end though. I suppose that AMD could attempt a dual Vega 10 solution to take the ultra high-end card like they have done in the past.

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        GP104 is a 314 mm² chip, while Vega 10 looks like a 500-550 mm² one, with further elevated costs for HBM2 modules, an interposer, and more complex assembly.

        I know a lot of that die is going towards enterprise features and enhancements like the double-throughput fp16 ALUs, but if the product can’t thoroughly outclass overclocked GTX 1080s at launch, it’s going to be a huge disappointment.

        Frankly, it needs to come close to Titan X(P) in gaming even before future software like fp16/fp32 hybrid shaders come into play.

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          The point is that performance gaming GPUs are not the massive cash cow anymore. The real money is in general compute. Nvidia has been moving in this direction too.

            • jts888
            • 3 years ago

            I agree, though it feels like Vega 10 is trying to push in both directions at the same time on the same silicon, at the expense of area.

            4x int8, 2x fp16, and huge virtual address spaces (with HBM as a transparent cache?) are still of unproven value in the gaming space, and more robust geometry setup and binning rasterizers don’t do much for general compute.

            GP100 spends its silicon on enormous register files, half-rate fp64, 4x HBM2 interfaces, and tons of external PCIe/NVLink IO, and all of which Vega 10 seems to lack equivalents to despite not being that much smaller. I hope for AMD’s sake that NCU, etc., prove to be compelling.

        • Aranarth
        • 3 years ago

        But will you then be impressed?!

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      The driver guy, you mean (everyone’s favorite intern).

        • K-L-Waster
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, give him (or perhaps it will be a “her” this term…) until at least early July to get up to speed on their work term before expecting a driver release. 😀

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        No this is AMD. It’s Nvidia who have been utterly useless at making stable drivers for the last 12 months

      • Liquidiam
      • 3 years ago

      I wonder if that is the reason why they aren’t more aggressive with their launch plans. Nvidia has has more than two years optimizing their software for the kind of stuff Vega is aiming to do. Deferred rasterizing, tiled rendering, fp16 etc. Dealing with the memory situation can’t be easy either.

      • ColeLT1
      • 3 years ago

      It’s (the 8 core chip) not going to directly compete with the 7700k, but the socket 2011 v3 chips. I was in the same boat, waiting for results, but then I realized if I wanted a lower ghz 6 or 8 core chip for gaming I would have bought a 2011 chip somewhere along the way instead of 1155/1150/1151 chips.

        • ptsant
        • 3 years ago

        I would have bought a 2011v3 chip if it weren’t that expensive.

        Local price for the 6850K is $650-700, which I could probably stomach. But then you need the $300 MB (way more expensive than Z270) and the 4-channel RAM ($400?). Total $1400, rounding up, without getting the “best” chip.

        A Kabylake upgrade would probably end up at $350 plus $400 for the platform ($200 RAM + $200 MB) for $750-800.

        If the Ryzen “extreme edition” 8-core is at $400-500 and the platform is at $400 ($200 RAM + $200 MB), this is $900 for the top chip and 2 extra cores (8 vs 6 for the 6850K).

        People don’t get 6c and 8c intel chips because the price gap from the 4c platform is huge.

          • ColeLT1
          • 3 years ago

          I would not have. We each have our own goals, and I love competition, but the money is not the issue for me. I simply want the highest FPS/smoothest gameplay. Buying into last years architecture also turned me away from fat-intel chips, I have built a few, but not for me. I also had a socket 1366 I7 back when the big chip lead the way.

          On a side note, I have 3 7700k’s sitting here at my desk, delid them 2 days ago. Just started overclocking, the first one appears to be a freak, on a hyper212 evo has done:
          4.9ghz on 1.200v (stock) 73-67-72-68c max
          5.0ghz on 1.275v (ran 14hrs last night) 84-77-83-79c max
          5.1ghz on 1.350v currently in loop 8 of x264 stress test 89-90-91-84c max

          The best of the 3 is going to be put in my case/custom loop. My previous best of 5.0ghz on a 4790k@1.45v finally broken! I wonder if I will get 5.2ghz out of one on water…

            • ptsant
            • 3 years ago

            I agree about the fact that the E-series is always 1-2 generations behind. It is a disappointment, but given the meager improvement over generations, it’s not that big a deal. I Plus, it’s offset by the advantage of 4-channel DDR.

            I no longer overclock and I have a mixed use pattern with frequent multi-threaded workloads. I would gladly give up 10% gaming performance for +30% multi-threaded performance.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Sell your AMD stock before then.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      Interested in buying AMD stock?

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        Not at this point in the game. I’m definitely a pessimist, but Zen is getting hyped to the same level Bulldozer was. So quickly people forget the past. TBH, Zen demos are looking more “realistic” than Bulldozer, but I’m going to stay in the “I’ll believe it when I see it” camp. The way I see it, AMD stock won’t increase significantly at launch since the optimism is pretty high already, especially after CES, but it does have the possibility of tanking if it turns out AMD over-hyped and under-delivered again. Also, will they launch on time? Will they launch more than 1 SKU initially? Or will it be another supply shortage situation like the RX480 launch?

          • sircharles32
          • 3 years ago

          As long as people remember that the original target (remember that magical 40% number thrown about) was basically Sandybridge IPC, no problem. But, if people go off the deep end, and expect AMD to magically meet or beat Skylake, then there will be a problem.

          I will call this a success, if AMD can show “Zen” to match IPC of Sandybridge. Clock rate will take care of the rest. If they can release a 4 GHz (base frequency) quad-core (8 threads), then I’d also call that a success.

          Nobody expects AMD to beat Intel with “Zen”, just be much more competitive, than it has been over the last decade.

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      “Buy the rumor, sell the fact” Old advice but probably smart, unless someone knows something we don’t… There’s been enough leaks though that I don’t think there will be any huge surprises.

        • NeelyCam
        • 3 years ago

        Yes. I’m thinking that Ryzen has been priced into the stock already. Any surprises left would be negative (e.g., delayed launch, poor yields, confusingly low price etc.). Now might be a good time to sell

          • freebird
          • 3 years ago

          What about Naples & Vega are they “priced” in also?

      • rudimentary_lathe
      • 3 years ago

      After it’s massive run up last year, AMD now has a market cap of ~$10B. Intel has a market cap of ~$175B, and Nvidia ~$54B. Now obviously there are major differences (Intel has its own fabs, Nvidia and Intel have arguably premium products that deserve fatter margins), but you could make the argument that AMD has a lot of room to run if it can execute and regain market share. Execution remains the key.

      On one hand I’m kicking myself for not taking a flyer at AMD at $2/share, but then I remind myself that I don’t speculate like that :).

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        I would speculate like that for AMD. You gotta hand it to them, their marketing department can polish a turd exceptionally well (not saying Zen will be a turd). As long as you sell before product launch, you could ride the marketing hype fairly consistently in their past few GPU/CPU architecture launches (not rebrands obviously), maybe not to the tune of 300%+ growth like we’ve seen with Zen, but within reason.

        • nico1982
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]On one hand I'm kicking myself for not taking a flyer at AMD at $2/share, but then I remind myself that I don't speculate like that :).[/quote<] Same here. I have been on the fence for months. Never pulled the trigger :\

      • Welch
      • 3 years ago

      Lol, I hope you’re wrong Pete. I was saying buy AMD at 2.40 range and people laughed. So far it’s kicking ass for me. Let’s hope for my stock and the computing world as a whole it keeps doing that.

      • freebird
      • 3 years ago

      That would be a “suckers” bet.

    • flip-mode
    • 3 years ago

    Yay!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This