Cryorig’s QF140 fans offer a choice of silence or performance

Cooling company Cryorig has unveiled a pair of new fans based on its existing QF120 series, but in an enlarged 140-mm form factor. Where Cyrorig offered three models in the QF120, though, the QF140 line is shaved down to two simple choices: QF140 Performance or QF140 Silent.

The QF140 Performance is the one you really don't want to stick your fingers into. The fan can rotate from 600 RPM to 1,850 RPM, and should output 128 CFM of air with 38 dBA of noise when running at the maximum speed. Cryorig suggests pairing this fan with 280-mm radiators and systems in need of especially high airflow.

At the other end of the range, the QF120 Silent can run from 200 RPM to 1,000 RPM while pushing a more modest 42 CFM. With a noise range from 9 dB to 19.5 dBA, it seems like the QF140 Silent should live up to its name when compared to its noisier sibling.

The basic internals of the QF140 fans are similar to those of the QF120 line. Like its predecessor, the QF140 has air intakes spots in each corner of the fan's rim. Cryorig claims this allows the fan to take in extra air and increase overall output. The new model also keeps the "High-Precision Low-Noise" fluid bearings and rubber vibration absorption pads that Cyrorig claims help make its fans quieter than the competition.

Both the QF140 Performance and Silent are on sale right now at sites like Newegg for $14.99 each.

Comments closed
    • Klyith
    • 3 years ago

    > the QF140 has air intakes spots in each corner of the fan’s rim

    these seem completely nonsensical. if the fan is oriented for push (on a heatsink or as an exhaust fan) they’re only going to be useful in the most confined of spaces. but if the fan is on pull (intake) they’re going to _reduce_ net airflow.

    • Michaelzehr
    • 3 years ago

    Is there a way to tell what the CFM and dB of the performance fan is if one limits it to 1000 RPM?

    I’m sure there’s a difference, right? Is the pitch of the blades different in the fans? I’m not very knowledgeable about fans, but I’m assuming a silent fan is different than a performance fan with a limit on the RPM.. but I don’t know what it is.

      • Freon
      • 3 years ago

      Your guess is probably right, but it’s very rare to see that kind of super thorough testing with calibrated mics, frequency spectrums, etc.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Nope. With variable speed fans they always just list highest CFM, lowest dB, and highest static pressure. Obviously those numbers correspond to completely different fan speeds. Your best bet is to find a review of said fan. I’ve seen many fan reviews that will show the full rpm vs ___ curves.

      Add: In the absence of reviews, many companies make variable rpm fans alongside fixed rpm fans with the exact same physical design. Those can provide a helpful data point.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      You are 100% right but empirical testing is the only way to know.

      Any given fan with fixed blades will have a 4-dimensional graph plot since the noise and airflow are dependent on both the RPM and the static pressure.

      What’s even more complicated than a 4-dimensional graph plot is that I’m describing the [i<]simplified[/i<] model, because in reality the static pressure changes in relation to the RPM of the fan too, so you need 5-dimensions to represent the results accurately. Some kind of inception graph-in-a-graph-in-a-graph-in-a-graph....

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    No RGB? What year is it?

      • Theolendras
      • 3 years ago

      I wouldn’t pay a dime for RGB, so there must still be a market for sober or value assuming I’m not alone…

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      It’s right there on the hub sticker. What more do you want?

        • ColeLT1
        • 3 years ago

        Red, Green, Blue, and YELLOW, this is some future tech right here!

        You heard it here first; RGB??… you may as well be doing the Macarena, drinking a Surge, wearing Umbro, while driving your Geo Tracker.

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          Didn’t Sharp do that in their TVs a while back?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            Yes, with George Takei pitching them.

            • UberGerbil
            • 3 years ago

            Oh [i<]my[/i<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            and that’s how I remembered the commercial.

            • jessterman21
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah, George Takei told me about it.

        • BillyBuerger
        • 3 years ago

        They even upped the game with RGBY.

        • tsk
        • 3 years ago

        I want my PC to look like a damn discoball on acid.

      • curtisb
      • 3 years ago

      You jest, but fans with white blades pair well with systems that have RGB lighting in them. I discovered this with one of my kids machines. As you would expect, the fans will reflect whatever color the lighting is set to so no more searching for fans that will match a color scheme.

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