Windows 10 Game Mode will prioritize games for smoother play

Remember that "Game Mode" feature that Twitter user WalkingCat found in Windows 10 build 14997? When we first heard about it, we were left wondering exactly what it did. Windows Central got to speak with Kevin Gammill from Microsoft's Xbox team, and the short version is that Game Mode is an OS feature that should slightly improve performance consistency in both UWP and Win32 games when it's activated.

Image: Windows Central

Primarily, Game Mode is intended to make game performance more consistent. By preventing system tasks and background tasks from stealing resources away from foreground games, gamers can avoid the hitches and stutters that come with multi-tasking while gaming. Microsoft says that players should see fewer dropped frames as a result of limiting CPU thread contention between games and system processes. The company notes that the ideas behind Game Mode are borrowed directly from the Xbox One.

Game Mode is controlled via the Xbox Game Bar. For those unfamiliar, the Game Bar is the small window that pops up in Windows 10 to ask if you're running a game or not. Telling the app "Yes, this is a game" brings up a window where you can set up the Game DVR feature on a per-title basis. The Game Mode feature will now be controlled from that window. Folks who have the Game Bar disabled—like yours truly—won't be able to use Game Mode.

That news doesn't break my heart, though. Windows Central asked Gammill which games will see the largest benefits from Game Mode, and unsurprisingly, the company says that while the feature will work for Win32 games, titles built on the Universal Windows Platform will see the largest gains.

Tweakers who have experience giving one application system-wide priority will no doubt be aware that doing so can cripple the performance of the rest of your machine. Thankfully, there should be no such issues with Game Mode, as it'll automatically disable itself when the game in question is minimized or loses focus. Developers don't have to do anything to support Game Mode, either, though Gammill says Microsoft is working with game developers to see how they can better make use of the feature.

Windows Central says that Game Mode will first appear in Build 15019 on the Windows 10 Fast Ring. By Tom's Hardware's reckoning, that should be the next build, planned to reach Windows Insiders around this time tomorrow. Folks who aren't part of the Windows Insider program will have to wait for the Creators Update coming this Spring.

Comments closed
    • BIF
    • 3 years ago

    When I read this headline, I wondered why Windows would need a ten-game mode.

    I mean, who plays ten games all at the same time?

    • trieste1s
    • 3 years ago

    A far better program to manage this will be Process Lasso.

    [url<]https://bitsum.com/[/url<]

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      I use it on my workstation. The UI never has any lags, no matter what else is running.

    • Mat3
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t need this for gaming, I need it in the first several minutes after a reboot! I want all user specific tasks to be given the highest priority (like me opening windows or programs) and all other tasks like loading background programs, Windows updates, the anti-virus wanting to run a system scan (at work, no control over this), or whatever else to take a backseat. I want them to stop immediately when I do something and only return when the system is truly idle.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 3 years ago

    There’s an interview on RPS too, with that Gammill dude.

    [url<]https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2017/01/25/windows-10-game-mode-explained/[/url<]

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]company says that while the feature will work for Win32 games, titles built on the Universal Windows Platform will see the largest gains.[/quote<] Did anyone else's red flag go up when they read this? Microsoft is admitting that UWP games are running unrelated various background tasks while you're playing them.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Well, not quite. What they’re actually saying is that UWP games are more self-contained and thus easier to bring to the “foreground” (figuratively speaking) of the OS. Win32 games can hook into all sorts of system libraries and even load up their own services and spawn all sorts of child processes and do all kinds of wacky things that Game Mode may not handle well.

      [i<][edit][/i<] To be clear, I don't use or support UWP apps or the Windows Store, but MS isn't being quite as nefarious here as it seems, that's all.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    I’m most hopeful for how this would impact the mobile/laptop/surface pro crowd. My surface 3 really struggles with DOTA2.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t expect miracles from this.

      It might reduce the number of “hic-ups” but that’s pretty much i.t

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    I remember programs that did this in the pre consumer multicore days, and even then the benefit wasn’t huge. With lots of RAM, cores, and bandwidth, ‘a few percent’ is in line with the upper bound I expected.

    And if it hadn’t been like that, I’d wonder what Microsoft was doing all that time!

    That said, I’d be curious what it does for low end hardware, i3 or 880k builds and the like.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Cool.

    Why (for the love of all that is sacred) are background tasks in Windows 10 not [b<]ALWAYS[/b<] given lowest priority and prevented from interrupting foreground activity? [b<]WHY, MICROSOFT, MUST THIS BE LIMITED SOLELY TO GAMING WITH YOUR STUPID XBOX APP THAT ADDS YET ANOTHER DAMN UNWANTED OVERLAY TO INTERRUPT OUR FULLSCREEN GAMING EXPERIENCE?!![/b<]

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 years ago

      Because it lets them “persuade” you to enable the XBOX App even if normally you would have it disabled… which then enables them do anything else they want on your system through said app…

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      I have an unverified source that is totally legitimate that says there is documentation regarding the development of this feature that claims and I quote:
      [quote=”Unverified Source”<]The lack of proper background task priority in the Windows OS, limitation of this new feature to games, and subsequent integration of this game priority feature into the XBOX app was done for the sole purpose of rendering one [b<]Chrispy_ from techreport.com[/b<] insane. All other benefits are considered windfall and further casualties are considered acceptable losses.[/quote<] Sorry bro. That just how the cards were dealt.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Your source sounds totally legitimate indeed 🙁
        I accept my fate and will sit here seething with fury and foaming at the mouth.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    This is forcing CPU affinities on easy mode.

    Nothing new here. It is really meant for old games that were coded before multi-core CPUs were commonplace or background applications that are just poorly coded in general.

      • puppetworx
      • 3 years ago

      Altering process priorities and power management plans is also highly likely.

    • Oriflamme
    • 3 years ago

    Game bar? Really?

    I disabled that because it wouldn’t let me bind to the guide button in my games.

    Also, it kept popping up that stupid message, asking if it’s a game on things that weren’t games.

    Let me manage that outside using the gamebar, please.

      • EzioAs
      • 3 years ago

      It will be in the Windows 10 Settings. They’ll add a new Game settings there.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        That looks like the Xbox app settings screen in the screenshot.

          • EzioAs
          • 3 years ago

          It’ll be available on both seeing as Microsoft is aware that the Xbox app is not super popular. Personally, I think they can design the app better, since they have some beautiful apps in my opinion, like Weather. The flat look of Windows doesn’t really grow on me but thankfully, they’re aware of that and has a newer UI concept in the work (Project Neon).

            • K-L-Waster
            • 3 years ago

            [quote<]It'll be available on both seeing as Microsoft is aware that the Xbox app is not super popular[/quote<] Do you have hard data on that, or is it an assumption? MS has a history of attempting to force unpopular UI changes on users, so it being unpopular isn't as much of an impediment as we would like...

            • EzioAs
            • 3 years ago

            If you’re referring to me pointing out that there’s a new option in Settings, here’s where I found them: [url<]http://www.windowscentral.com/windows-10-insiders-will-see-beam-streaming-game-mode-and-more-tomorrow[/url<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            So it’s the Xbox app’s settings moved into the control panel. That means you’re still using the Xbox app, it just gets a fresh coat of paint.

            • EzioAs
            • 3 years ago

            Yes and no. You’ll have access to the Xbox App settings but not the games and social features directly, I assume.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Also, it kept popping up that stupid message, asking if it's a game on things that weren't games.[/quote<] My favorite example of this was presenter mode in PowerPoint 2013.

        • Meadows
        • 3 years ago

        “You think this is a game?”

        • NTMBK
        • 3 years ago

        You don’t want that blazing framerate to drop!

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    It sounds like it just makes the OS “nicer” to games.

      • DrDominodog51
      • 3 years ago

      Well done. This is my favorite pun so far this year.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 3 years ago

        I feel dumb. You’re going to have to explain this one to me.

          • exilon
          • 3 years ago

          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nice_(Unix)[/url<]

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 3 years ago

        … that’s a low bar 😛
        EDIT: That is to say it’s early in the year.

        • BIF
        • 3 years ago

        But he has +17 (at this writing). That’s almost the lowest priority. 😉

    • willmore
    • 3 years ago

    A lot of good game mode will do if Windows will still do an upgrade and force a reboot while you’re in the middle of a game.

      • curtisb
      • 3 years ago

      Stop beating that horse…it’s been dead for far too long. Configure your active hours and you won’t have a problem. I have never once had Windows 10 force a reboot while I was using my system.

        • travbrad
        • 3 years ago

        That’s nice if you are always using your PC within the same exact 12 hours of the day (the maximum amount of “active hours” you can set), but that isn’t true for everyone.

        It’s just stupid in the first place too. If Windows sees there is a fullscreen program (usually using their own API, Direct3D) running and using a bunch of resources it should just automatically know to wait for the update until that program is done running. Whether it affects you personally or not it’s just badly designed/implemented.

          • VincentHanna
          • 3 years ago

          If you are incapable of predicting your busy videogame schedule because it is just too chaotic to pin down to one single 12 hour window, then: …

          Use policies to partially disable the auto update features,
          Schedule your updates individually for times when you aren’t using your PC
          Check the box to defer updates indefinitely and then install them manually instead
          Manually update BEFORE sitting down to a 13 hr gaming session
          Check the box to defer updates indefinitely and then never install them because you are a rebel and way too tough to worry about things like security and new features anyway…

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 3 years ago

            [quote=”VincentHanna”<]If you are incapable of predicting your busy videogame schedule because it is just too chaotic to pin down to one single 12 hour window, then: ...[/quote<] Why should I have to justify myself to my computer in the first place? I figured with it being a device that I spent a potentially large amount of currency on for my work and/or entertainment that it would be subject to my whim instead of the other way around. [quote="VincentHanna"<]Schedule your updates individually for times when you aren't using your PC[/quote<] I did this in Win7/Win8 by having Microsoft notify my of updates and then starting the update process manually when the computer was done with its current set of tasks. It didn't matter if it was when I got done playing a game in 30 minutes or when it got done with a render in 30 hours. [quote="VincentHanna"<]Check the box to defer updates indefinitely[/quote<] From Microsoft: [i<]"Some Windows 10 editions let you defer upgrades to your PC. When you defer upgrades, new Windows features won’t be downloaded or installed for several months. Deferring upgrades doesn’t affect security updates. Note that deferring upgrades will prevent you from getting the latest Windows features as soon as they’re available."[/i<] [url<]https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/instantanswers/20a98a29-df85-b9e9-f04e-e7812bc903f6/defer-upgrades-in-windows-10[/url<] Only some versions of Windows 10 allow this in the first place. This setting does not defer indefinitely as you state. (Though that should be plenty of time to get it done manually) This setting only affects new features and does not defer security updates. Therefore, this does not eliminate the reboot problem.

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            -I didn’t ask you to justify yourself, just pick a time. Any number on the clock when you will likely want to schedule updates.

            -I really don’t have much sympathy for people who do “real work” on a system licensed for home use. It’s up there with people who are too arrogant to be bothered to learn how to use a system. Caveat Emptor. The cheap comes out expensive. The only one you have to blame is yourself. Yadda yadda.

            -Security updates DO install either without restart, or the next time you turn off your PC. It doesn’t force a restart… so it kindof does eliminate the reboot problem.

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 3 years ago

            [quote=”VincentHanna”<]-I didn't ask you to justify yourself, just pick a time. Any number on the clock when you will likely want to schedule updates. [/quote<] I know [b<]you[/b<] didn't ask me to justify myself, but I view the fact that I have to work within the bounds of my Operating System's workflow rather than the other way around a bit backwards. Windows 10 will act without my approval or even interaction (it is certainly not justifying itself to me). If I want to delay, I have to take extra step and Windows 10 still limits what steps I can take. This is perhaps more of an ideological issue than a practical. [quote="VincentHanna"<]-I really don't have much sympathy for people who do "real work" on a system licensed for home use.[/quote<] Fair enough. I don't personally use a windows 10 system for business purposes. We are still using Windows 7 where I am employed. I was using "work" in the general sense to refer to non-entertainment tasks you might be doing rather than specifically employment oriented tasks (though, it could still potentially generate revenue). That said, there are a plethora of small businesses for which Windows 10 (Home) pre-installed laptops are the tool of choice, but that is a different story that you clearly have little sympathy for ;'). [quote="VincentHanna"<]-Security updates DO install either without restart, or the next time you turn off your PC. It doesn't force a restart... so it kindof does eliminate the reboot problem.[/quote<] I have several Windows 10 systems that do in fact restart on their own for some security updates. Granted, I saw it first on my Wife's system and she leaves it on all the time, but it was running Windows 10 Pro same as my other machines. I let some of the other systems sit on an update just to make sure it wasn't a fluke. So, I'll have to disagree with you there based on personal experience. Perhaps it is simply a difference in the way the systems are set up vs the systems you use. Of course, even with the feature updates, you've only deferred until the next upgrade period. While this should provide several times more than sufficient time to find a gap in your schedule and get the system updated on your own, it still isn't indefinite (nitpick I know).

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            Well, if you want to nitpick,
            [quote<] [super<]indefinite [in-def-uh-nit] adjective 1. not definite; without fixed or specified limit; unlimited: an indefinite number. 2. not clearly defined or determined; not precise or exact: an indefinite boundary; an indefinite date in the future. 3. Grammar. indefinite article. indefinite pronoun. 4. very numerous or not easily counted. indeterminate.[/super<] [/quote<] [quote<] This is perhaps more of an ideological issue than a practical.[/quote<] Indeed.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            [quote<] -I really don't have much sympathy for people who do "real work" on a system licensed for home use. [/quote<] This is BS, you could do any sort of work from home. School/Uni work is real work. Responding to emails (if you're self employed, for example) from home is real work. "Real work" is defined by the person doing the work, not by random internet comment standards. And I think it's absurd that one must pay a significant premium over the home version of windows (which isn't cheap itself btw) just to defer updates. It's arbitrary product segmentation and MS making money off trivial features. To add insult to injury, the ability to pick updates has been a feature of every home edition of windows - revoking that update, especially for people who accepted the "free upgrade" to Win 10 is stupid.

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            Yes, but “home” doesn’t just refer to the location of the laptop, it refers to the type of license you have purchased from MSFT. A “home” license is specifically a license not designated for commercial or professional use.

            Did you know that MSFT could, in theory, sue you for a percentage of every dollar you earned while using an improperly licensed system? Same thing goes for MSFT office and using home/student licenses. Same thing for other software produced by other parties and people who aren’t MSFT. (and for the record, legal standard, not internet comments standard)

            PS, you could join the insider program, which comes with a free upgrade to pro, if you don’t want to “pay the significant premium to get the defer updates checkbox”. That’s free. Did I mention free?

          • curtisb
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]the same exact 12 hours of the day (the maximum amount of "active hours" you can set)[/quote<] The maximum changes to 18 hours with the Creators Update. As I stated in another reply, it's not difficult to change the Active Hours before you start gaming or working on something important. I don't disagree that it's a hassle and they went a little draconian with the update settings. People wanted Windows updated more often rather than once a month and this is what we got. They're (and we're) damned if they do, damned if they don't. You do have the option to defer updates, too. Provide feedback through the Feedback Hub so it can be voted on. I'm sure if you search "Active Hours" or "Windows Updates" there are already other entries that can be voted on and you can add your comments to.

        • rahulahl
        • 3 years ago

        I do shift work. I can game at 1pm, 1am, 8am, 8PM or pretty much any time on random days of the week. How am I supposed to set my active hours?

        What I need is a script that will dynamically update every hour and make the next 6 hours active hours. Can we manage this via command line somehow?

          • VincentHanna
          • 3 years ago

          Set them to install from 4am to 4pm, because that is probably, statistically the most accurate option, and then just reschedule the updates when they happen to be scheduled in a non-ideal way?

          • curtisb
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]How am I supposed to set my active hours?[/quote<] Change it before you start gaming. It's not like they put a limitation on how many times you can change your Active Hours, nor is there a lag time before the change takes.

            • travbrad
            • 3 years ago

            That is a solution. The problem is it’s a solution for a problem that shouldn’t exist. It’s pretty silly that you would need to change Windows system settings every time you want to play a game, encode some videos, etc.

            This sort of stuff seems very similar to the Apple “you’re holding it wrong” philosophy, but I guess it’s okay for Microsoft to do it?

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            The only people who really have cause to complain are people who leave their computer performing a task without supervision (or maybe, at the extreme end, people who don’t save their work before they get up to make a sandwich) and come back to find that the computer has performed an update, however, that situation is a known quantity, and for those people, there are other options.

            If you routinely leave your computer running calculations or rendering 3d scenes or whatnot, then it would behoove you to not allow that behavior in the first place by clicking the defer upgrade checkbox.

            If you routinely draft important 100page long legal briefs, it would be a great idea to save your doc before going and grabbing that sandwhich.

            And if you get a popup that says “hey, i’m going to restart in 30 minutes (and again 20 minutes later)” and you find that to be inconvenient to you, I recommend simply telling the computer “no thanks” and setting the update for another time that will be more convenient… and if you cannot possibly predict it, because you are a free spirit, an unbridled stallion who cannot be pinned down to any “schedule” then, well pick a time anyway and then repeat the process as necessary while you continue to be “unpredictable.”

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            That is certainly the nonsense red herring here that certain people would like to imply.

            Nobody is suggesting that every time you sit in front of a computer, you must, first, give it instructions “okay now, i’m going to be using you for the next 6 hours, don’t restart a bajillion times.” Not unless you are an idiot, or simply derive pleasure from the experience for some reason.

            In actuality, you set some preferred “active hours” [b<]one time[/b<], and if, by some chance, you are using your PC when it goes to update, simply reschedule the update. Simple as that.

        • Rurouni
        • 3 years ago

        This just happen to me around last week. My PC is always on since it also serve as a file server at my home. I was in front of my PC while my PC was doing important task (rendering) and then a message popped out that my PC WILL restart in x minutes! Initially I’m not panicking since I’m pretty sure those smart guy at MS have something to cancel the process or delay it more, but NO, apparently they thought that it was the best to just force restart regardless of whether your PC utilization is high. So I was panicked and search the net to stop the process and eventually have to install an app from somewhere to stop the reboot process probably less than 5 minutes before the PC rebooted.

          • VincentHanna
          • 3 years ago

          When a restart is scheduled, this option is available to temporarily override active hours and schedule a custom time to finish installing the current update(s). Make sure your device is plugged in at the scheduled time.

          settings -> updates -> restart time…

          Just saying

            • SuperSpy
            • 3 years ago

            [quote<]When a restart is scheduled, this option is available to [b<]temporarily[/b<] override active hours and schedule a custom time to finish installing the current update(s). Make sure your device is plugged in at the scheduled time. [/quote<] So after every update, you have to redo that setting. Sounds fun. /s

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            The permanent option wasn’t good enough. He was looking for a temporary override.

            There is a permanent one too, it’s called “active hours.” You schedule it, and then, it installs while you are away from the PC. You don’t have to redo it after each install.

            • SuperSpy
            • 3 years ago

            Active house is useless if your usage window is either larger or more erratic than the 12 hours it allows.

            • VincentHanna
            • 3 years ago

            All scheduling schema are “useless” if your schedule is erratic and unpredictable, by definition. So yeah, if you can’t predict weeks in advance when you will want to install your updates, then that feature is not very helpful. So? What is your point? You want a weekly popup that is going to remind you to reschedule your updates for that week? now that sounds annoying.

            Turn off auto updates, Do It Yourself, stop whining about the mean scary MSFT forcing you to patch your software and protect your sensitive information from hackers and thieves, and get over it. Problem solved.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            I would have no problem with this if it actually spent 3 lines of code checking to see if the system is being actively used (even outside the insane 12 hour window it allows you to set).

            A 20 hour window would make no difference to updates, yet be infinitely easier to schedule. It should still PROMPT for reboot regardless of the setting if the machine has an active interactive user.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            BUT THE USER CAN’T BE TRUSTED! THE OS KNOWS ALL!

          • Ifalna
          • 3 years ago

          Okay, seriously? They didn’t even give the “restart later” thing an active user could click like back in the day?

          Well that’s idiotic.
          Won’t ever happen to me, because I have the habit of restarting almost immediately after an update and turn off my comp every night, but still. The OS should not behave this way.

          • Wilko
          • 3 years ago

          Your post reminded me of this: [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxXs0Yy5-0Y[/url<] Escalates really quickly!

        • duke_sandman
        • 3 years ago

        Let’s say I actually do “work” on my Win10 machine — like say coding MATLAB and C++ algorithms for my research. I work 10 hours, then run 14 hours of Monte-Carlo sims. There is NEVER a time that my PC is not active.

        Will game mode prevent my machine from updating and rebooting in the middle of a simulation — losing my work?

          • VincentHanna
          • 3 years ago

          Use the defer updates checkbox. It would be easier…

          settings -> updates -> advanced -> defer updates

      • Vinceant
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve been on the insider fast ring since the June before launch and I haven’t had this happen since just after launch; and I get a new build about every week or two. Maybe it’s a thing on RTM or live, but at least in later builds 10 is REALLY good about letting you know a reboot is pending and letting you schedule it or whatever, or just do it now.

      I abhor a lot of things about Windows 10, and I thought this was going to be a big issue, but it really isn’t.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Reading up through the reply chain here it seems VincentHanna really really disagrees with you. He’s entitled to his opinions, but my opinion is that he’s wrong and Microsoft are being ass-backwardly lazy in not fixing this stupid behaviour.

      Honestly, I have to sleep for several hours every day. I’d rather not waste time being asleep but it’s an affliction I just can’t avoid. It’s saddening and pathetic that during those periods my Windows installation can’t use a very simple heuristic to work out whether I’m using the PC or not:

      [b<][list<][*<]HAS THE USER MOVED THE MOUSE OR PRESSED THE KEYBOARD IN THE LAST TWO HOURS? [/*<][*<]IS ANY FOREGROUND APPLICATION CURRENTLY ACTIVE? [/*<][*<]ARE ANY MEDIA FILES IN NETWORK SHARES ON THIS MACHINE CURRENTLY BEING PLAYED BY OTHER DEVICES?[/*<][/list<][/b<] If the answer to [i<]any[/i<] of those questions is yes, the machine is in use so [b<]DON'T **** WITH IT PLEASE![/b<]

        • K-L-Waster
        • 3 years ago

        That is a simple, logical, and user-centric approach.

        Which of course means it will only be followed by MS after all other options have been exhausted.

    • Redocbew
    • 3 years ago

    I’m obviously going against the grain in thinking like this and applying it to Windows, but why do we even need a game mode? Is there really that much ambient noise inside the OS that we need widgets on top of widgets in order to manage it all?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      A fair question. I’m very curious to see if this makes any difference at all in a fast gaming PC.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      From reading more detailed explanations on other sites, my understanding is that this feature won’t increase max fps, only minimize spiky frame times.

      Presumably, this is caused by a perfect storm of the game needing the cpu to react to something quickly but a random background app decides that it needs that thread’s cycle to do a periodic check or something. You figure that if you have a couple background apps that are each checking something small a couple times an hour, that kind of perfect storm is certainly possible.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        If that’s what it does, that’s great. It also seems that Redocbew’s question is answered with a “yes, in some cases”

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        [quote=”literally this page”<]Primarily, Game Mode is intended to make game performance more consistent. By preventing system tasks and background tasks from stealing resources away from foreground games, gamers can avoid the hitches and stutters that come with multi-tasking while gaming.[/quote<]

        • p3ngwin
        • 3 years ago

        this is exactly the problem mobile OS’ face, especially Android, in avoiding stutters in the foreground Application.

        It’s not a new problem for PC’s, and mobiles are beginning to get very complex, so they are experiencing a fast evolution through the PC’s past problems.

    • TheRazorsEdge
    • 3 years ago

    So if it stops background system processes and shuts off when applications lose focus, can I enable this for all of my interactive applications?

    Because, honestly, Microsoft’s best guess regarding when a background task should run is pretty horrible.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      You can actually tell Windows 10 that any app is a game by pressing Win+G with the window focused. It seems very likely you will in fact be able to enable this for almost any app, although whether it will work for something like Chrome (which spawns a billion background processes) is anyone’s guess.

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        Presumably it’ll mark the parent process as the game – so any children should “just work”.

        That said, it’s tempting to mark Explorer.exe as a game to see what happens. 😛

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Why would anyone want to give Chrome a higher CPU priority? That sounds like a recipe for an unresponsive system.

    • CampinCarl
    • 3 years ago

    Can someone explain to me how this won’t impact my ability to seamlessly alt-tab between desktop and game? Will this be quickly switch to normal prioritization schema when I alt-tab?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      [quote=”myself, in the post”<]Thankfully, there should be no such issues with Game Mode, as it'll automatically disable itself when the game in question is minimized or loses focus.[/quote<]

        • CampinCarl
        • 3 years ago

        Whoops, my bad! I need to improve my skimming skills!

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 3 years ago

      Changing priority between existing levels is seamless.

      That said, this is a new feature so the only real answer is to wait and see when it’s delivered.

      Speculation and alpha/beta reports are often misleading.

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