HP issues a recall for 101,000 laptop batteries

Another day, another story about defective batteries. This time, it's Hewlett-Packard recalling laptop batteries and urging customers to stick to AC power until their units can be replaced. The Consumer Product Safety Commission says that 101,000 laptop computers marketed under the HP and Compaq brand names contain lithium-ion batteries that can overheat and potentially catch fire. HP is offering customers a free replacement battery, so gerbils expecting a Kaby Lake replacement for their 2013-vintage Celeron laptop shouldn't get their hopes up.

Affected laptop series include HP's ProBook, Envy, and Pavilion ranges, along with Compaq Presario models. The defective batteries have bar codes starting with 6BZLU, 6CGFK, 6CGFQ, 6CZMB, 6DEMA, 6DEMH, 6DGAL and 6EBVA. Owners of computers with these batteries should visit HP's battery recall web site.

 This round of recalls comes after the manufacturer was forced to recall 41,000 laptop batteries with similar problems in June. In both instances, the batteries contain cells manufactured by Panasonic, though there's no word on the exact cause of the failure.

Comments closed
    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    Crap.

    I have a ProBook, and an EliteBook that uses the same type of battery as the ProBook (though I don’t see EliteBook mentioned). Guess I’d better go check the bar codes.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Looks like I’m OK. Until the next recall anyway…

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    Highly Phlammable?

    • NeelyCam
    • 3 years ago

    It’s over 100,000!

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    The issue has been tracked down to an obscure Safari bug specific to page caching.

      • ludi
      • 3 years ago

      +1 for snark. +10 for getting here faster than chuckula.

      • VincentHanna
      • 3 years ago

      HP has been roundly criticized by TR reporters for not sitting on their hands with their fingers in their ears pretending that the problem didn’t exist, saying that it was unethical to offer a recall before apple had a chance to weigh in on the issue.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    What’s with the extra 1,000 units in both situations? Strange. Such a nice round number otherwise.

      • Kougar
      • 3 years ago

      The executives were fans of 101 Dalmatians when they were kids and wanted to scale it up. And also keep the firedogs employed.

    • Visigoth
    • 3 years ago

    Ouch. :-/ Better safe than sorry though.

    I think the whole industry needs to take another look at the battery manufacturing process more seriously and start implementing concrete changes to prevent these incidences from occurring in the first place, like the promising tech below:

    [url<]http://www.phonearena.com/news/The-future-of-smartphones-fireproof-batteries_id90011[/url<]

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      How much is the average consumer willing to pay in extra design cost or safety features to deter a .00000001% occurrence?

        • ludi
        • 3 years ago

        That’s the point of the tech described in that link, the tradeoffs are supposed to be fairly small.

        Besides, we’re paying for it already; the cost of all these recalls eventually gets folded into the next generation devices. If you can count on the battery to self-extinguish then the recall doesn’t have to be nearly so urgent; you may even be able to just offer extended warranty to cover the few dozen devices that fail during their usable lifespan instead of pre-emptively replacing 100k battery packs on the risk that a few might burn down the house.

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          Hey now, where would the talking heads be if their house hadn’t burnt down?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      How does putting batteries in concrete fix things?

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