Print your own Kaby Lake CPU delidding tool

Delidding Intel CPUs is a somewhat dangerous task with meager benefits for most users. Traditionally, the process required pliers, a vise, a blade, a little sweat, and no small measure of skill. It doesn't have to be that way, though. We previoulsy reported on Rockit 88's Haswell and Skylake delidding tool a few months ago, and now YouImagine user Chri has uploaded a 3D-printable design for a Kaby Lake delidding tool.

Image source: YouImagine.com

Delidding CPUs has become a popular past-time among competitive overclockers and people who just can't leave a working CPU alone, ever since Intel stopped soldering the integrated heat spreaders (IHS) to the dies on its consumer-grade CPUs. Desktop chips after the second-generation Core Sandy Bridge models have come with thermal paste filling the gap between the ceramic CPU die and the aluminum IHS.

Image source: YouImagine.com

Rockit 88 has previously stated that delidding a Haswell desktop chip resulted in a 10°C reduction in CPU temperature when overclocking. User testing has shown less-encouraging results, but as with everything related to overclocking, your mileage may vary. Owners of Intel workstation-grade LGA 2011 and 2011v3 CPUs don't need to bother with delidding, though, since good ol' solder still lies beneath those chips' heat spreaders.

We should note that even with a delidding tool, the user risks damaging the CPU during the process. Once complete, the heatsink installation is also a little riskier and somewhat reminiscent of the bad old days of installing heatsinks on the first socketed Athlons.

Chri acknoweledges that he or she has yet to actually try and use the delidding tool, though. Chri also recommends printing the plans with a very precise 3D printer and using at least three perimeters and 30% infill. After looking at the design, I wonder if using a "maker-grade" CNC machine to cut a delidding tool from hardwood might make for a more reliable, sturdier tool.

Comments closed
    • John p
    • 3 years ago

    350usd and we get poor tim. why do we get poor tim ?
    cause intel doesnt care

    • etana
    • 3 years ago

    Somehow i read that as: “Print your own Kaby Lake CPU diddling tool” and thought that fanboy-ism had reached a new plateau.

      • daspendejo
      • 3 years ago

      Lmao. CPU diddling tool… fanvoyeur-ism. But seriously I might have to delid one of these.

    • Pwnstar
    • 3 years ago

    BIG warning sign when you mentioned the creator hadn’t ever used his own tool.

    • Bauxite
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]We should note that even with a delidding tool, the user risks damaging the CPU during the process. Once complete, the heatsink installation is also a little riskier and somewhat reminiscent of the bad old days of installing heatsinks on the first socketed Athlons.[/quote<] Actually, these days most people who delid put the lid back on, zero change to heatsink mounting methods. You gain almost as much as a naked core just using better TIM and (more importantly) fixing the horrible gap their bulk assembly glue usually creates. The only real risks are the 'violent' delid action itself or fumbling really bad during your TIM application and relid. It is rather pathetic that even K cpus (which are just arbitrary unlocks to begin with) are sloppy crap these days, considering they saved a few bucks more by no longer including a crappy heatsink. But hey, being a fully armed and operational [s<]battlestation[/s<] monopoly is grand!

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, biggest improvement isn’t so much the change of TIM (although of course you’re going to it put back with better TIM in there) – it’s the fact that you are reducing the gap size that the old TIM was filling.

      I ground the top and bottom of my lids flat (and also the base of my heatsink on the same wheel whilst I was at it). technically it’s possible that the lid no longer protects the core but it just a metal sandwich filler to maintain heatsink mounting compatibility. I don’t care;

      I hot-melt glue the IHS back in place with a small dab on each side (not on the bottom) just to hold it in place whilst I’m reinstalling it. I think the hot-melt glue decrystallizes at about 90-110C but there’s no way the IHS would reach that temperature without the magic smoke escaping from the processor anyway.

    • xeridea
    • 3 years ago

    Since masses are going to such great lengths to fix the stupid thermal interface on high end CPUs, you would think Intel would get the hint and stop selling crap thermal setups, instead of denying it is an issue.

      • willmore
      • 3 years ago

      What’s in it for them? They’ve got nothing to motivate them to do otherwise. 🙁

        • xeridea
        • 3 years ago

        They would stop getting bad press over it? Not necessarily huge deal right now since AMD has been lagging so bad, but it will when Ryzen launches.

          • willmore
          • 3 years ago

          What press? Us, here, complaining?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Masses aren’t doing that. A small portion of the consumer base who buy individually boxed CPUs (which is already a small segment to begin with) are delidding them.

      As for the thermal solution, it meets all specifications that Intel advertises for its products. The fact that it’s not theoretically ideal for a high-end overclock doesn’t mean it isn’t doing its job.

        • xeridea
        • 3 years ago

        Not necessarily masses, but a lot. It is widely known that their setup is junk. Even without OC, there is a difference. It would be extremely easy, and cost them nothing for them to do it right, yet they insist on doing it bad, and getting bad press.

          • brucek2
          • 3 years ago

          They changed from the old way to the new way. No company goes out of their way to make a manufacturing change like that without believing there is some benefit to them, whether cost, speed, reliability, ?, I don’t know. My bet is cost, even if it’s pennies.

          As to “a lot” – seriously – what is your best estimate the percent of Intel CPUs sold in the past 2 years that have been delidded. My guess is that 1% of 1% would be a massive over estimate.

    • willmore
    • 3 years ago

    Want to try doing this, TR? I’ll print you one if you do.

      • Arclight
      • 3 years ago

      Comments like this make me realize we live in the future. Also, I’m disappointed by it.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 3 years ago

    Psst… The Original Athlon was Slot A. The Socket A models came later. Socket 370 was just as bad if not worse.

    Even as a fan of vintage\retro hardware I have no desire to ever go back to those days. Are there any options for reattaching an IHS with a better TIM?

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, squirt new TIM on the die and glue the IHS back down.

      [add] you’ll want to scrape as much of the IHS glue off before you re-attach so you don’t add MORE gap between the die and IHS than was there in the first place.

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        I didn’t even bother with gluing the IHS back down.
        I just slapped it back on and carefully placed it back into the socket. The retaining bracket and the heatsink hold it on fine (and it’s been running for over 3.5 years now).

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          Good point. I forgot about the retaining bracket/clip.

          • maxxcool
          • 3 years ago

          I was wondering if this was a thing or not. The paste when appropriately thin is quite sticky on a broad surface.

          This makes me want to try it even more now..

        • Magic Hate Ball
        • 3 years ago

        I’ve seen people use “instant gasket” stuff for automotive engines as glue. No worries about the CPU temperatures ruining the adhesive with something rated for temperatures far higher.

        • ozzuneoj
        • 3 years ago

        But does it make much difference vs. the original TIM? Has anyone attempted any kind if solder method?

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Good point about the first Athlon being a Genesis cartridge. Article corrected on that.

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      462 4 lyfe

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    YOU KIDS AND YOUR 3D PRINTERS!
    BACK IN MY DAY [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=88253#p1167072<]WE DELIDDED OUR CHIPS WITH A VICE, A BLOCK OF WOOD, AND A HAMMER![/url<] UPHILL! IN THE SNOW! BOTH WAYS! AND WE LIKED IT!

      • Magic Hate Ball
      • 3 years ago

      Oh man, the discussion of the Socket A heatsink installs in that thread gave me flashbacks to the first time I was putting my Athlon Thunderbird 1.33ghz rig together.

      That pry down mechanic with direct contact to the core…. *shudders*

      • vargis14
      • 3 years ago

      LMAO

      you forgot in our bare feet 🙂

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      YOU KIDS WITH YOUR FANCY TOOLS!

      [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1a1wHxTyo<]BACK IN MY DAY[/url<] WE DELIDDED OUR CHIPS WITH NOTHING BUT T' BLOODIED STUMPS OF OUR FINGERS AFT' WORKING TWENTY-NINE HOURS 'DAY DOWN T' MILL. AND WE WERE [i<]LUCKY![/i<]

      • wes1099
      • 3 years ago

      You’re only a real OG if you used a razor blade.

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