Lian-Li PC-O11 chassis is big and beautiful

I was pretty interested in that Lian-Li PC-O10 tempered-glass case until I realized it required an SFX power supply. I didn't tell the company, but apparently somebody did, because Lian-Li just released the PC-O11. This dual-chambered tempered-glass tower case is almost a copy of the O10, just wider and deeper. The PC-O11 is huge, and Lian-Li goes so far as to call it "titanic."  As a result, it will accept standard ATX power supplies and motherboards up to E-ATX size.

Like its predecessors in Lian Li's PC-O line, the PC-O11 encloses the motherboard and graphics cards in a tempered-glass cage, while a separate aluminum-encased compartment holds the power supply, drives, and wiring. Despite the dual-chambered design, the case has more-or-less standard tower dimensions at 20" x 18"x 11" (or 50.6 cm x 45.7 cm x 27.7 cm) The case has no external drive bays, though its front panel sports a USB 3.1 Type-C connector along the usual audio and USB 3.0 ports.

There's plenty of room for drives inside. Builders can mount up to four 3.5" HDDs and four 2.5" drives in the PC-O11. The case has a total of eight expansion slots openings to properly support the E-ATX form factor. Builders with a penchant for vanity can opt to sacrifice the last four slots and use an optional riser-and-bracket kit to mount a graphics card parallel to the motherboard.

Cooling shouldn't be much of a problem in the O11. The case doesn't come with any fans, but builders can attach a 360-mm radiator to the top and bottom of the case. Additionally, Lian-Li includes a removable bracket to mount a 360-mm radiator in the front of the case behind the tempered-glass panel. Of course, any of the radiator mounts can instead accept a trio of 120-mm fans. Unusually, the rear panel of the case only has mounts for 80-mm fans.

Those who like big glass sheets can grab the PC-O11 in from Newegg for $230 in a black finish.

Comments closed
    • K-L-Waster
    • 3 years ago

    Nice clean design if you’re into gigantic cases.

    Personally I’m moving more towards “case the size of a six pack” than “case the size of a beer fridge”, but this looks like a good option for people at the other end of the size spectrum.

    • sluggo
    • 3 years ago

    Motherboard manufacturers need to bring a “re-pin” product to market, with all the power, SATA and fan cable headers mounted on the back side. I think it would sell well for users who would buy a case like this one (and others). Very clean look, and a lot less tight angle cable bending.

    They wouldn’t have to change anything about the production process up until backload. The bill of materials doesn’t change, except that they’d have to toss in a crossover cable to account for the power supply keying. Stock two otherwise identical SKU’s – ATX and ATX “re-pin”.

    The motherboard tray would require new passthroughs, but that seems an easy hurdle. I’d pay the premium if the product were available.

    EDIT: Of course, enterprising gerbils with soldering skills can do this themselves.

    • hansmuff
    • 3 years ago

    This case is wide, why not make it wider to hold 140mm fans in the front and 120mm in the back?!? That’s just beyond me; and you call that “Titanic?”. And it doesn’t come with fans, so the effective price is at least $50 higher to have a few decent fans, probably more.

    The 2nd compartment isn’t any use. Why not have the PSU on top to draw hot air out? Corsair’s Carbide 600 got that right, and still manages to hide the PSU cable mess.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      PSU is the component in your system *most* sensitive to heat. It’s definitely preferable to have it removed from the hot components.

      The case is designed for bottom-up airflow, which is why it can take six 120mm fans between the two. This is a nice design that works with the natural tendency of hot air to rise.

    • tanker27
    • 3 years ago

    noob question……How is that video card flat against the MOBO? is there an adapter for that?

    Edit: I should read first 😛 I wonder if you can use that in other cases.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      A number of other cases, like [url=https://techreport.com/news/30911/thermaltake-brings-tempered-glass-to-its-core-p5-line<]these[/url<] [url=https://techreport.com/news/30575/thermaltake-view-27-case-offers-a-birds-eye-view-of-builds<]Thermaltakes[/url<], also have that feature. It's also common in ITX and slim-MicroATX cases. You can buy just the riser to DIY on Newegg. Amazon, etc.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      You have to buy the [url=http://www.lian-li.com/en/dt_portfolio/o11-1/<]O11-1[/url<] riser kit separately.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, you can spend extra to make all your other slots completely pointless by blocking them with a graphics card.

      At which point, with your “single-slot motherboard” you might find yourself thinking “why in the hell didn’t I buy mITX?!”

        • K-L-Waster
        • 3 years ago

        It might get agoraphobic in this case tho….

    • juzz86
    • 3 years ago

    I know these sort of boxes get ragged on a bit here because nobody should have a window or LED lights, but if you need to build a classy showcase machine and not have it look like an aquarium or child’s toy (a la Thermaltake The Tower 900), this is the way to do it.

    Price is more reasonable than I expected, too. Beautiful bit of kit, shame there’s no 140mm mounts though.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, I thought the price was pretty nice too given what it is, although unusually for Lian-Li the inside of the case is actually a steel frame. The thing weighs like 50 lbs.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 years ago

      I have two Lian Lian like cases totaling over $550 and I think the corsair 570x and 460x without LED fans is far superior in style, air flow, cable, design, and price.

      Lian li is a dinosaur brand stuck in the 90s like most of you.

      Sup?

        • juzz86
        • 3 years ago

        Dude/ette I haven’t seen you about for a bit. I miss your sass sometimes 🙂

        The Corsair cases you mention are good, but make the same mistake a lot of tempered glass cases of that form factor make – who wants to see the ‘cable side’ behind glass? I’m a true pedant around the back of my tray, and I’d still hate to stare at the bloody thing.

        This one’s glass where it matters, slab where it counts. Interesting that it’s a steel frame, but that no doubt is why it isn’t the $399 I thought it would be.

        The classic look isn’t quite dead yet. I don’t mind a bit of bling in my toys but there’s still something to be said for understated – I agree with the Old Guard on that 🙂

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        We Lian-Li fans simply prefer our cases with a bit of class, sir, unlike you. 🙂

        • Khali
        • 3 years ago

        And you sir want to go back to the 80’s where cases were crammed full, had heat issues, and any peripherals had to be external and scattered all over the desk top.

      • Thresher
      • 3 years ago

      The thing about this case is that you can make the interior as wild or as muted as you want it. The case itself is fairly demure, so if you want to leave it clean looking, it’s a solid option. Not so with ones that have all the lights in them, weird shapes, etc. I just don’t care for the GAMER! aesthetic. I game, but I also want something that will look classy. More BMW and less Pontiac Fiero with ground effects package.

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