ROG Strix Impact is a simple mouse for serious gamers

We're coming up on 45 years of the video game in 2017. A lot of older folks, even ones who played games in their young adulthood, have trouble with modern game controllers. All those sticks and buttons and levers and knobs are confusing. Can't we go back to the days when you had one stick and two buttons? If you share a similar sentiment about gaming mice and their myriad manipulables, then have a look at Asus ROG's new Strix Impact mouse.

This device is nearly as simple as it gets. A left button, a right button, and a clickable scroll wheel are the entirety of the Strix Impact's inputs. There's also an extra button on top to flip through DPI settings. The Impact offers an optical sensor capable of tracking with up to 5000 DPI resolution and 30 gs of acceleration, and like any quality mouse it uses durable Omron switches for the primary buttons. Those specs in an otherwise basic mouse could be an attractive package for gamers on a budget, or folks who simply prefer a simpler mouse.

Asus says that since the buttons' surfaces aren't connected to the main body of the mouse, the buttons will be easier to press. The company is also proud of the fact that the ROG Strix Impact weighs just 91 grams without its cable. That's half-again the weight of MadCatz' RAT 1 mouse, but this thing probably won't snap in half if you rest your palm on it. It has Aura Sync RGB lighting for the Strix logo on the back, and Mayan-inspired textured accents on the rear quarter and the scroll wheel. Best of all, it includes two ROG logo stickers.

Asus didn't announce pricing or availability for the new mouse, but we'd expect this one to come in around the same $50 price point as the ROG Sica it appears to replace.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    They don’t list the sensor, which is the single most important feature of a gaming mouse. It might be a good sensor, but if it was, they’d proudly display it on their specifications page.

    It feels like when a monitor manufacturer doesn’t list the panel type. If it’s a good panel type like AMVA+ or AH-IPS, they’re happy to put that information front and center. When it’s TN, they either omit the information altogether, or disguise it like this behind weasel-wording:

    [quote<]Panel Type: Clearview LED Horizontal viewing angle: 170 degrees Vertical viewing angle: 160 degrees[/quote<] Yeah, I don't know what sensor this mouse has, but if it was worth listing it would be listed.

    • Hattig
    • 3 years ago

    Well, at least it’s simple and hopefully robust.

    They could have added one thumb button though, surely! Although getting it in a good location for everyone is difficult, certainly I sometimes find them placed too far forward for my mouse grip style.

    I have no idea how you would use a Roccat Kova though, those buttons must contort your thumb seriously, and how do you hit the buttons on the other side (maybe my little finger needs some training up?)…

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      People have wildly varying hand and finger geometries. That’s one of the things I think a lot of people miss when talking about mouse preference.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    Mayan? Like what–a cut off head or or cut out heart, a jaguar or winged snake thingy?

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      The world ends when it reaches the end of warranty.

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    They’ll sell more units of a serious mouse for simple gamers.

    • videobits
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] Can't we go back to the days when you had one stick and two buttons? [/quote<] TWO buttons? I started with just one, thanks: [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Atari-2600-Wood-4Sw-Set.jpg[/url<]

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      That’s the four switch, lightweight 2600. My single-button joysticks were attached to an [url=http://www.the-liberator.net/site-files/retro-games/hardware/Atari-2600/atari-2600-6-switch-woody-rev-a-1978-sunnyvale/Atari-6-Switch-Woody-Sunnyvale-CA-Standard-001.JPG<]original six-switch[/url<], heavy base VCS (it wasn't called the 2600 until later). Summer of Star Wars, Christmas of VCS: 1977 was a [i<]very[/i<] good year. 🙂

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        I was not quite born Christmas of 1977, but I got the tiny 2600 around 7 years later and it still evokes wonderful memories.

      • Growler
      • 3 years ago

      The Commodore 64 and 128 used Atari joysticks. It took me a while to get used to using the Nintendo game pad, let alone the three(!) buttons on a Genesis game pad.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 3 years ago

        Anyone who gamed much using the Atari 2600 joysticks realized that a Wico bat handle, although twice as expensive, was about ten times better.
        [url<]http://www.ebay.com/itm/121991158720[/url<]

    • LostCat
    • 3 years ago

    Hmm. Might buy it. Might not.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t buy any mice that lack the 4th and 5th buttons. Having “back” under your thumb is a huge ergonomic improvement.

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      Funny, I’ve remapped the 4th and 5th to copy and paste, respectively. And then forgot they were there (I literally just had to look up what those buttons are mapped to… and I’ve been using that mouse long enough that my thumb has worn through the soft grippy stuff immediately beneath the 4th and 5th buttons). You can lead a horse to ergonomic improvements, but you can’t make him click on them.

        • Froz
        • 3 years ago

        Oh, I used them for copy and paste as well, except I really use them, all the time. I’m always annoyed when I have to switch back to keyboard shortcuts when I’m on another device.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      I hit “back” by accident far more than I do on purpose.

        • EzioAs
        • 3 years ago

        You’re probably not using the correct mouse for your hand. I’m using a Logitech G400S for work and a CM Storm Recon for my main rig, and I don’t really have that problem with either of them. The G400S is more of a palm-grip while the Recon is best when you claw grip it.

        Additional note(s): The Recon is ambidextrous and has additional 2 buttons on each side (ie. 6th and 7th button) but I disabled the two on the right since I accidentally clicked them when using using it with my right hand. It’s really nice though for people looking into ambidextrous mouse.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          I’ve been using the same mouse for like 7 years: a Logitech MX518. I did replace it (with another MX518) a month or so ago, but it’s always been the case. I just may never get used to it.

        • superjawes
        • 3 years ago

        You’re clicking it wrong.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Depends on the mouse. On my kova, the fwd/back buttons are surrounded by a raised lip of plastic that prevents accidental clicks. Some ppl say it rubs their hand raw, but I’ve never had an issue with it, it’s probably grip and hand size related.

        As RAGEPRO said, ppl have different hand sizes and grips, it’s a shame with online buying that we don’t get to try mice before buying them, and reviews only get you so far.

        • ColeLT1
        • 3 years ago

        Same here, with my microsoft wireless. At home, my deathadder (have used them for over 10 years) I have no issues. Button placement is key, but I would rather just not have them.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      Agreed; that’s the button that’s wearing out on my Taipan. Also nice for games to have some combination of reload, block, use, and sheath/holster readily available.

      • ozzuneoj
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, I’m so used to this that its almost as noticeable as missing a scroll wheel when I have to browse the web with a “standard” 3 button mouse. I’ve had 5 button mice since the original MX500 13-14 years ago.

      • HERETIC
      • 3 years ago

      Problem I find is they’re not really under the thumb any more,
      They seem to have been moved back too far on most mice these days.
      Even reversing back and forward-still have to move hand to use back,
      which I easily use over 100 times a day…………………

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      I find those buttons hugely useful for binding melee/special attacks

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      Agreed. I’m spoilt on my roccat kova with additional ‘Smartcast’ buttons on either side of the main buttons and 10 buttons in total, with up to 22 programmable functions using the shift button. You’d think one wouldn’t find a use for 22 button functions on a mouse, but life finds a way, life finds a way.

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      I have a back button, but I also love Vivaldi (and previously, Opera) for having a button chord input that lets you navigate fwd/back with the two main buttons.

    • thedosbox
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Best of all, it includes two ROG logo stickers.[/quote<] I can *feel* the sarcasm.

      • Ultracer
      • 3 years ago

      You know, it’s still a lot more usable than the other 2 sticker from that company 😉

      • tanker27
      • 3 years ago

      Dude, Brand stickers are gold and are a good currency for bartering.

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