Phanteks Glacier gear flows into the water-cooling market

Phanteks took the plunge into the depths of custom open-loop cooling parts with its July release of the Glacier G1080 water block for Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 FE graphics cards. The company is now expanding the liquid-cooling section of its catalog and has unveiled the Glacier C350i CPU water block and Glacier series water cooling fittings.

The Glacier C350i is built around a nickel-plated, solid-copper cold plate with 0.4-mm channels. The block is topped off by an acrylic cover and an aluminum trim ring with a choice of satin-black or chrome finishes. Viton seals fill the seams between the block and the cover plate. Since it's 2017 and the C350i is a high-end cooling product, it has embedded RGB LED illumination. Phanteks says the RGB LEDs are compatible with the company's RGB LED-equipped cases and can be controlled through Asus' Aura or MSI's Mystic Light Sync software. The C350i is prepared to perch atop Intel LGA 115x or 2011-v3 CPUs. AMD CPUs are not supported. 

Phanteks' Glacier series G1/4 fittings are available for use with hard-tube or soft-tube coolant lines. The fittings come in multiple varieties: for small and large tubes, as 45° and 90° rotary fittings, and stop fittings. The hard-tube offerings are more numerous by necessity, since soft-tube systems tend to need fewer fittings. All Phanteks fittings use Viton seals and are machined from solid brass. Buyers can get them in satin black or mirrored finishes.

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    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    I want someone to talk me through the process of building my own custom-loop cooling rig. But first I need them to buy me the Sandy Bridge-E and Volta GPU upgrade that I’d want to put under the blocks.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Connect pipes, fill system, prime system, use system.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah I gotta be honest this stuff scares the crap out of me.

          • Redocbew
          • 3 years ago

          It’s not nearly as scary these days as it used to be. Compression fittings have taken most of the chance of leaks out of the equation, and if you use Tygon or some other decent PVC tubing that’s flexible it’s fairly easy to hook everything up. Don’t mix metals, and use a biocide to stop gunk from growing in your blocks and tubing and you shouldn’t have any surprises.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            I look at what people build and it’s super cool, and I’ve read [url=http://www.forbes.com/sites/antonyleather/2016/10/31/how-to-build-a-liquid-cooled-gaming-pc/4/#4703b53f2013<]this thing on Forbes[/url<]. But then I look at NZXT makes adapter to install Krakens on graphics cards and I think "man that looks so much easier." But it'd still be really cool to build a custom loop. It's on my bucket list, so to speak.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Sandy Bridge-E[/quote<] I was going to say that you misspelled RyZen there. But then I remembered: RyZen is so efficient it doesn't need water cooling.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        YOUR JOKES ARE SO EFFICIENT THEY WRITE THEMSELVES

      • juzz86
      • 3 years ago

      It’s great fun Ben, your first run with a GPU under a custom loop will blow your socks off temp-wise.

      – A good rule is 120mm of radiator to start, plus 120mm of radiator for every component plumbed into the loop – if you’re chasing low temps. If you’re happy with marginally better than air-cooler temps, I’ve run a 3930k and two 780s off a single 280mm radiator.

      – Fitting/block plating, tubing and Acetal/Delrin is usually rated to 60C – don’t let your water ever get that hot.

      – Don’t mix your metals too much.

      – Skip cheap unknown pumps – D5 vario all the way.

      – Skip bayres’ with pumps attached – they vibrate too much.

      – Push/pull fans are rubbish except on the thickest rads with the highest FPI.

      – Distilled water with some biocide is fine for coolant, if you’re after long-term low maintenance (or some colour) radiator coolant is also fine.

      – Flush all your bits after you receive them and before assembly.

      – Build your loop , fill and just run the pump for a bit, putting paper over GPU/fans etc to check for leaks.

      – Don’t start with hard tubing.

      – Buy second-hand where you can, because it’s an expensive hobby.

      – If you can get away with it, skip the fancy rotary fittings – they’re just another fail point. Only use them where fitment is tight.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Looks like you’re confirming that soft tubing is the way to go to start at least. I figured it’d be more forgiving if it’s a tad long or whatever.

        If I seriously build a Ryzen box this summer I’ll look more into it.

        edit: took me a couple days to notice another auto-correct catastrophe.

          • juzz86
          • 3 years ago

          Personally hopeless with the hard stuff – but I’m also a sucker for the curves of a soft tube loop mate, so a bit biased 🙂

      • DarkUltra
      • 3 years ago

      I can recommend a Maelstrom 5 1/4.” It is completely silent if I connect it to my CPU fan header and control the speed with Asus Fan Xpert 3.

      [url<]http://www.swiftech.com/MaelstromBayRes.aspx[/url<] But mount it horizontally or you have to use duct tape to prevent the fillport from leaking. I found it much better to add a third tube to it to fill it up just by removing the side panel instead of screwing the thing out when I need to refill it. Also go with a Haswell E they OC better than Broadwell. But wait until Ryzen is out to get much better prices. More here [url<]http://jooh.no/index.php/2016/07/03/building-gaara-i7-5960x-gtx-980-ti/[/url<]

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