Samsung shows off its Exynos 9 SoC built on a 10-nm process

Time for a moment of honesty, gerbils. Is there room in your life to discuss more than one upcoming processor? Yes? Good. Samsung just announced the latest version of its Exynos SoC, and it's primed to appear in a variety of devices in the coming year.

The Exynos 9 Series (8895) SoC is built on what Samsung claims is the world's first 10-nm FinFET process. The company says the new process node lets the Exynos 9 perform 27% faster with 40% lower power consumption than the previous 14-nm offerings. The Exynos 8895 contains an octa-core processor comprising four of Samsung's custom cores and four ARM-designed Cortex-A53 cores. The LTE modem present in the previous-generation Exynos 8890 got upgraded to an LTE-Advanced unit capable of 1Gbps downlink and 150 Mbps uplink speeds.

For graphics horsepower, Samsung turned to a variant of ARM's latest GPU design, the Mali-G71 MP20. Samsung claims that it gets 60% higher performance from this GPU than its predecessor, and that it operates at a lower temperature, too. Naturally, Samsung claims this GPU is a natural fit for use with virtual reality devices.

The Exynos 8895 offers several other intriguing features. The SoC includes a separate security sub-system with its own processing unit and flash memory protector. Samsung added a "vision processing" unit to the SoC, purportedly allowing Exynos 8895-powered devices to detect, track, and recognize objects. Finally, the SoC's image handling supports front and rear-facing 28MP cameras. The Exynos 8895 is currently in mass production, so we expect to soon hear about devices powered by it.

Comments closed
    • RdVi
    • 3 years ago

    G71 MP20 is surprisingly beefy. Makes Huawei’s MP8 still look anemic like their MP4’s of yesteryear were.

      • willmore
      • 3 years ago

      Since Bifrost is a completely different architecture, you can’t really compare them like that, but yeah, the take away is that a G71MP20 should be a beast–especially at 10nm.

      Maybe they’re looking to give Apple a run for their money?

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    Will be intersting to see how this compares to the SD835, might be retiring my Nexus 5 this year.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    Doesn’t really matter too much to most of TR’s audience, though. We’re going to see Snapdragon-based devices in North America.

      • adisor19
      • 3 years ago

      Except for Apple devices and Samsung. Since Apple is suing the bejesus out of Qualcomm, perhaps Samsung will dare bring phones in NA with their own LTE implementation and take advantage of the situation to defy Qualcomm. I mean, they have PLENTY of fab space available now that Apple ditched them for their A10 SoCs so that’s no longer an issue.

      Very curious to see how this new SoC compares as well 🙂

      Adi

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        You really think a lawsuit filed at the end of January is going to cause Samsung to toss the probably-already-very-finalized Galaxy S8 design? It’s not going to [url=http://www.recode.net/2017/1/23/14364550/qualcomm-apple-suit-countersuit-likely<]stop Qualcomm[/url<] from selling its modems to Apple, so I doubt it's going to cause Samsung to run away screaming. In fact, at that same moment in time, Samsung was [url=http://www.theverge.com/2017/1/24/14367594/samsung-galaxy-s8-snapdragon-835-2017<]reportedly hoarding all the SD835 chips[/url<] the company could get its hands on.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Oh, hey, would ya [url=https://techreport.com/news/31486/rumor-samsung-galaxy-s8-specs-detailed<]look at that[/url<]

          • adisor19
          • 3 years ago

          Next model perhaps.

          Adi

    • USAFTW
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder how their 10-nm tech compares to Intel’s 14?

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Slightly denser but very much in the same generation, far closer to Intel 14 than Intel 10.

      [url<]https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/31680415/1-Node-positioning-ICK.png[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Great, just great, now there’s ANOTHER 8-core CPU that will destroy the 6900K at Cinebench!

      • ultima_trev
      • 3 years ago

      If Samsung could make an ARM CPU that’s faster than the second fastest desktop CPU on sale today then AMD and Intel both would have proper reason to sh1t themselves. It would prove x86 is obsolete.

      Edit: First fastest being the 6950X, just for clarification.

        • willmore
        • 3 years ago

        Okay, to dispell this myth that is based on the assumptions 1) ARM isn’t fast enough 2) it can’t be made fast enough 3) if it were it would rule the world.

        1) There is not reason ARM processors can’t be made as fast as x86 processors. There are datacenter chips that are (at leas in aggregate) faster than many x86 processors. And they’re generally produced by companies with one thousandth the budget of Intel. It can be done. Qualcomm has mentioned some efforts in this area, so keep your eyes open.

        2) The reason ARM chips are made to run at the speeds they are is because they’re part of an eco system that imposes strict thermal and power limits. Phones and tablets just can’t handle more thermal dissipation and can’t hold much larger batteries. So, there’s no incentive for anyone on this product segment to make more power hungry chips.

        3) Even if someone like Qualcomm or Samsung were to produce an x86 competetive chip (in speed, functionality, and power) what kinds of machines would it be put in? PCs? Nope, they have to run Windows and Microsoft forgot how to cross platform development over a decade ago. MacOS? Well, maybe if Apple was the one who designed the chip. Laptops are the obvious candidtate and, oh, look, chrome books. Hmm, they sort of are taking over a product segment. Let’s see where that goes? Don’t expect it to happen overnight.

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]oh, look, chrome books. Hmm, they sort of are taking over a product segment. [/quote<] Yeah, and any of the ones worth owning run x86 chips, which are [SURPRISE] just as efficient as anything ARM has in that segment.

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