Kingston DCP-1000 SSDs are ready for the datacenter

As wonderful as it is to have speedy storage on a desktop computer system, the real need for the fastest drives is in the datacenter. Kingston's DCP-1000 line of PCIe NVMe storage devices is designed specifically for the requirements of that market. The DCP-1000 series drives are available in 800GB, 1.6TB, and 3.2TB capacities, all rated to deliver sequential read speeds up to 6800 MB/s. When it comes to sequential writes, smallest model can write up to 5000 MB/s of important business data per second, while the larger models can do 6000 MB/s.

The 1.6-TB model offers the highest random read and write performance, with a claimed 1.1 million read IOPS and 200K write IOPS. Endurance ranges from 187 TBW on the 800 GB model all the way up to 697 TBW on the range-topping 3.2TB unit. A PCIe 3.0 x8 slot is required to run the DCP-1000 at full tilt. In-flight data is protected via ECC memory and "enterprise-class power failure protection," presumably involving the bank of capacitors on the top of the card.

Kingston didn't offer pricing or availability information, but the drives' datacenter ambitions and high performance tell us DCP-1000 drives will be spendy. Whatever the price, the company is backing the drives with a five-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • Kougar
    • 3 years ago

    This thing uses four logical drives to create a single DCP1000… to achieve those performance figures you have to run the card in 4xRAID 0 mode.

    • robertsup
    • 3 years ago

    somebody was drunk in kingston? that small tbw and “data center” in one sentence? some customers drive have bigger

    • not@home
    • 3 years ago

    SLC? MLC? TLC?

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    How hard would it be for the industry to push PCIe SSDs instead of M.2? PCIe is ubiquitous and most folks have a bunch of PCIe slots sitting around doing a whole lot of nothing. Plus, you have practically no issues with PCB size unlike M.2 with all those numerical designations because PCB size can be an issue. Ok, maybe it isn’t as big an issue as some think it would be but PCIe has absolutely no size issue unless it’s the size of a Voodoo5 6000.

      • acquacow
      • 3 years ago

      Have you seen the ioDrive Octal? =)

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        I just Googled it. Yep, a tiny USB flash drive it’s not.

      • Flying Fox
      • 3 years ago

      You have to keep in mind, the lower end consumer boards out there have the x16 slot for the video card, then the rest are basically x1 slots, which defeat the purpose of PCIe SSD in at least x4 mode. You can get more lanes on higher end motherboards, but that usually means diverting (Intel) CPU’s 8 lanes away from the video card, assuming there is a physical x16 slot available on the motherboard.

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