Logitech G Pro keyboard is small on size and big on customization

Cherry and its colorfully-named products are probably the first thing that pops into mind when discussing mechanical keyboard switches, but several other manufacturers produce those components. Logitech developed its own reduced-travel Romer-G mechanical switches back in 2014, and the unique clickers are used in the company's G Pro mechanical gaming keyboard. Gamers looking for short-stroke keys and customizability will find a lot to like in the G Pro.

The included Logitech Gaming Software lets users configure the backlight colors on a per-key basis. The lighting on individual keys can be disabled in the software, so that only critical keys are illuminated. While many gaming keyboards have modes that disable the Windows keys, the G Pro goes a step farther and lets gamers disable any key on the entire board in order to prevent inadvertent key presses during a gaming session. The software also allows users to add macros to the function-key block. Logitech's product page lists Windows 7 or newer in the system requirements, so fans of Unix-based operating systems like macOS and Linux may be out of luck there.

The G Pro boasts 26-key-rollover. We're not sure if someone at Logitech is a fan of Wade Boggs or if there's a technical reason behind the number 26, but given that most gamers only have ten fingers, 26-KRO probably isn't a limitation in any way. The Romer-G switches have the same rated actuation force as Cherry MX Blues, but the travel is reduced to 3.0 mm from the Blue's 4.0 mm.

The keyboard's feet allow the G Pro to sit at 0°, 4°, or 8° from the desk surface, which is one more option than most keyboards. The cable is a 6' (1.8 m) detachable number, terminated with standard Type-A and microUSB ends. The connection on the microUSB end is stabilized with a three-pronged tip.

The Logitech G Pro tenkeyless mechanical keyboard is available now from Logitech for $130. The company backs the keyboard with a two-year warranty. Logitech says each switch should last 70 million key strokes on average.

Comments closed
    • RdVi
    • 3 years ago

    This is actually right up my alley! I have a wireless numpad (otherwise no way i would go without the 10-key) but need a gaming keyboard that I can move out of the way easily for my typing keyboard.

    The microUSB cable connector is odd though. The RRP is definitely too rich for my blood also, but if it comes on sale I’ll probably pick one up.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Am I old fashioned for not wanting all these extra softwares for my peripherals (keyboard, mouse, GPU, etc. A lot of them for lighting control, but some for actual functionality) running in the background all the time? My mindset probably stems from back in the days of single core CPUs where the more background processes/programs you had running significantly affected your PC’s performance.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      No, not old fashioned.

      All this janky fluff added to peripherals just does something in a proprietary and awkward way that the host PC it is connected to could do much better. I don’t actually understand it, but then again, I don’t actually understand the RGBLED craze that’s plaguing the industry right now. I think it’s just called [i<]having taste[/i<]... 😉

        • slowriot
        • 3 years ago

        It’s a large market. It may be a large market comprised primarily of teenagers but that’s a large market.

        The constant crapping on RGB stuff bothers me 1000x more than the products themselves. Do you have trouble finding a plain keyboard? I don’t. Any keycap style you could possibly want is also available these days. Any key switch, etc. It’s all out there, more choice for all kinds than ever. But yet… always on TR it’s the same. Article: “RGB Keyboard X is now available” and the comments section “I don’t know what is it that makes me a super special snowflake but I don’t like this stuff.” Ok Mr. I Have Taste. No need to constantly remind us all.

      • TwistedKestrel
      • 3 years ago

      Well… you don’t have to use them. I’m assuming this still works as a regular HID keyboard

        • slowriot
        • 3 years ago

        It does.

        • Khali
        • 3 years ago

        Ah but there is the issue. People don’t want to pay for something they are never going to use.

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      And people wonder why 16gb RAM has become a minimum spec for current applications.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Awwww, they’ve used a micro USB socket and then had to reinforce it with a bulky, proprietary plastic clip because micro USB-A is fragile and unsuitable.

    Why not just use a regular USB-A in the first place? Especially since the likely requirement is for a regular USB-A at the other end too….

      • alloyD
      • 3 years ago

      Better yet, if you need stability: USB-B. That’s actually what you’re supposed to use for the device end in the large form factor. USB-A to USB-B cables are really common. I’m not sure I’ve seen A-A laying around anywhere.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Yep, I guess that would be even better!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      It is a gaming peripheral – it’ll fall apart in three to five years so they can sell you the next big thing.

      I’ve just replaced a Logitech G600 after the left mouse button became worn out and intermittent 4 million clicks into it’s supposed 20 million click lifespan.

      • BoilerGamer
      • 3 years ago

      >Awwww, they’ve used a micro USB socket and then had to reinforce it with a bulky, proprietary plastic clip because micro USB-A is fragile and unsuitable.

      That same cable is the charging cable for Logitech’s wireless gaming mouse(G403/G900,etc), what you suggested would work for a Keyboard, but there isn’t enough space for it on a Mouse.

      Thus they made it this way, only one cable need to be manufactured instead one for Keyboard and one for mouse.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Uh, you can’t use the keyboard cable to charge your mouse, otherwise your keyboard would stop working!

        It’s not a wireless keyboard is it? (or have I misread the article!?)

        Anyway, just charge your mouse with the phone charger that’s on your desk already….

          • BoilerGamer
          • 3 years ago

          The point is that Logitech only need to manufacture one version of the charging cable their for keyboard and mouse instead of 2(One micro USB and One USB-A), whether you use the same cable to charge keyboard and mouse is completely beside the point.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    Seems to compete with the TR-recommended Logitech G410? I have that model due a great deal on AMZN and like it a lot.

      • Vaughn
      • 3 years ago

      This looks like the 810 keyboard without the media keys and no num pad.

      I paid $99 for the 810 during christmas!

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Ah, but does your 810 have the word PRO on the side?
        NO! it just has a boring G810 on the side. How lame.

        If you buy this one you will be a PRO, not a loser;
        Suck it up, throw your G810 in the trash and fork out another $130.

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