Radeon 17.3.1 drivers are ready to explore Ghost Recon: Wildlands

Ghost Recon: Wildlands is upon us. If you're planning to play it on your Radeon, make sure you grab the just-released Radeon driver 17.3.1 package. The new driver has specific optimizations for the military open-world co-op game, and AMD says it improves performance by as much as 6% on Radeon RX 480s. That may not sound like much, but remember that game performance is a tricky thing to measure. A 6% overall performance uplift could mean a significant improvement in the worst-case scenarios.

Ghost Recon: Wildlands

The new driver package also adds a CrossFire profile for Wildlands, although there's a bug that might cause it to crash on launch with three- or four-way CrossFire enabled. Also, task switching out of the game while running in CrossFire mode might cause flickering and require a game restart. We've been dubious on the benefits of multi-GPU systems for a while now, but it's still good to see that AMD is supporting them after that contentious stage show demoing two Radeon RX 480 cards running Ashes of the Singularity.

Other fixed issues includes flickering textures after task-switching out of Battlefield 1, mouse cursor corruption on RX 480 cards, and stuttering in applications running in borderless-window mode on a FreeSync display. That last fix has been a long time coming. Flickering in For Honor should be resolved, including on multi-GPU systems. CS:GO shouldn't stutter with Chill enabled anymore, and DOTA 2 shouldn't stutter with ReLive enabled now. Radeon R9 380 owners should be able to use Radeon WattMan without fear of having the whole machine hang, too.

Most of the known issues center around CrossFire and FreeSync. FreeSync and super-sampling in Sniper Elite 4 are known to cause problems or not work at all. Radeon Settings may crash when switching users with CrossFire enabled, and game profiles are sometimes being lost or reset after a reboot. Speaking of CrossFire, Shadow Warrior 2 won't run in multi-GPU mode because there's no profile for it. CS:GO and World of Warcraft could flicker the first time you run them after rebooting while using a FreeSync display. Task switching out and back into the games should clear that up, though.

There's a separate known issue list for Radeon ReLive altogether. You can check that out—as well as the rest of the fixed and known issues—by reading AMD's release notes. Or you can just go ahead and grab the latest driver from AMD's download site.

Comments closed
    • Robby.niemi
    • 3 years ago

    I have 2 r9 270x 4 gb in crossfire but i cant seem to get GRWL to play without crashing my driver is the 7.3.3 latest driver from amd. Any suggestions?

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 3 years ago

    Has there been a really thorough analysis of Chill? All the articles I can find are launch week stuff from December. Also, does anybody have better suggestions for the universal hotkeys for Chill and ReLive? 😛

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      I haven’t seen much since December either. I know the [url=http://www.amd.com/en-us/innovations/software-technologies/radeon-software/gaming/radeon-chill<]17 games whitelisted[/url<] are a limitation. As far as I'm aware, it will only work for whitelisted games, which is unfortunate. No DX12 support yet either. Reminds me of a pioneering program called Lucid Virtu from back in the Ivy Bridge days. Whitelist-only = fail. I personally think Frame Rate Target Control (FRTC) is a better avenue to pursue. If only because it seemingly doesn't require a whitelist. FRTC still offers the power/heat saving benefits of downclocking the GPU to not generate more frames than your monitor is capable of displaying.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 3 years ago

      I tried Relive once and while it was easy to use, didn’t support the highest compression mode available, nor VBR. OBS is superior for compression and features, but is lacking with ease of use. One of these programs needs to implement the improvements of the other.

    • Concupiscence
    • 3 years ago

    I know Ryzen reviews are still so new they’re sizzling, but has anyone looked at CPU scaling for AMD cards on the new architecture? From personal experience I’ll confirm that AMD’s driver overhead was a sticking point on the FX chips, and I was wondering if that’s finally a thing of the past with Ryzen.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 3 years ago

      Ryzen doesn’t have bulldozer’s deficiencies, so I’d say not a problem. Also, the 8370 seems to be finally pulling ahead of the i5 2500k with proper multi-core optimizations.
      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylvdSnEbL50[/url<] 1440p benchmarks are completely on par with Intel. From reading other reviews, it seems that a large amount of the 1080p disparity came from the Intel systems running faster DDR and [url=http://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-performance-negatively-affected-windows-10-scheduler-bug<]suboptimal windows support[/url<]. AMD apparently needs certain memory chips to use higher speeds, but you should be able to get 3600 running. Either way, anyone running 1440p will not notice a difference in framerate, and have more headroom with the extra cores. Once the bugs get ironed out, Ryzen should be the more future proof cpu.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Both my brother and I had flickering problems with the 17.2.1 drivers. We both had to roll back..

    I would’ve liked to see them improving their FRTC and Chill features, but it looks like they had a fair amount of bug fixes to take care of this time, so I’ll give Scott a pass.

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