Arctic Freezer 33 coolers are ready for Ryzen

Perhaps in a nod to increasing awareness of the possibility of melting polar ice caps as a result of global climate change, Arctic has released its Freezer 33 series of semi-passive CPU coolers. There are three models on offer, each sharing the same heatsink design with four direct-contact 6-mm copper heatpipes connected to an aluminum fin array sized to fit at least one 120-mm fan.

The Freezer 33 and the Plus model come with Arctic's F12 fans. The base model has a single fan, and the Plus version adds a second spinner. The Freezer 33 CO is designed for continuous operation and swaps out the standard fan for a premium unit with a Japanese ball bearing design. Arctic claims this bearing is up to five times more durable than other designs. 

Arctic claims the arrangment of the heatpipes within the fin stack delivers superior heat dissipation relative to the company's existing products, and should fit crowded motherboards easily. The fans supplied with all three cooler models carry on-board controllers that stop the fan from spinning entirely when the PWM duty cycle is below 40%. The company debuted this approach in its Freezer i32 Plus model. The built-in silent mode means that even users of motherboards without fine-grained PWM control can enjoy silence when CPU temperatures are low. 

All three models stand 5.9" (15 cm) tall and are 4.8" (12 cm) wide. The single-fan models are 3.75" (9.5 cm) wide, while the Freezer 33 Plus measures a thicker 4.0" (10 cm) on account of the its second fan. The Freezer 33 and the CO model weigh in at 22.6 oz. (641 g), while the Plus weighs 26.5 oz. (752 g).

Gerbils clinging to older processors should check the Freezer 33's specs before ordering. Only modern Intel desktop sockets with 1150 to 2011 pins and AMD AM4 are supported. Owners of Intel LGA 775 and AMD pre-Ryzen chips will have to look elsewhere.

All three Freezer 33 models are available for pre-order from Arctic now. The single-standard-fan Freezer 33 sells for $46, while the dual-standard-fan Freezer 33 Plus and the single-premium-fan Freezer 33 CO are offered at $50. Arctic expects deliveries to begin in early April. All three models are backed by a six-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • south side sammy
    • 3 years ago

    I think they have the pricing all wrong. We all know the AiO’s aren’t going to last 10 years ( and beyond the life of the product they cool ) like the freezer pro or 212. So the AiO’s should be priced at $29 ( for consistent replacement that won’t hurt our wallets) and the 212, etc., should be $50+.

    • Stochastic
    • 3 years ago

    Does anyone know whether a big CPU cooler shoot-out has been done recently? Are there any budget (sub $40) coolers that have toppled the Cooler Master 212 EVO?

      • south side sammy
      • 3 years ago

      arctic cooler freezer pros used to be the cat’s meow back in the earlier noughties. the only reason the 212 is so popular is everybody want to spend a s little as possible. doesn’t have anything to do with which one cools better. I think the name’s been around so long people got tired of seeing it too, wanted something else.
      I purchased a lot of those, but even moved on just to try something else even though they were good.

    • Shobai
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]All three models stand 5.9" (15 cm) tall and are 4.8" (12 cm) wide. The single-fan models are 3.75" (9.5 cm) wide, while the Freezer 33 Plus measures a thicker 4.0" (10 cm)[/quote<] That second 'wide' should probably be 'deep' instead.

    • gmskking
    • 3 years ago

    I wouldn’t put a air cooler on any Ryzen. Who still uses air coolers anyway?

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      Most people?

        • Redocbew
        • 3 years ago

        Pretty much. Watercooling might not be as scary as it used to be, but even with the AIOs around now it’s got a ways to go before it becomes commonplace.

          • Anovoca
          • 3 years ago

          That and a $70 air cooler will get you 3c hotter chip for half the noise of a $150 aio.

      • fxv300
      • 3 years ago

      Is there that much difference between AIO and something like the Noctua NH D15 ?
      The cryorig R1 ULTIMATE also competes well in reviews.
      I’ve been researching as I’m about to build a new rig.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Not really. All the water loop does is shift heat faster than a heatpipe.

        At the end of the day, you are still limited mostly by radiator size and how much fan noise you can tolerate. Up to about 240mm radiators you don’t really need watercooling because 4-6 good heatpipes are more than adequate to move the heat to the vanes of the heatsink. The two heatsinks you mentioned have similar heatsink volumes to the air volume of a 240 radiator but without the cost and noise of a pump too.

        Beyond 240mm, there’s just not enough space around the CPU socket to cram all that cooling volume in, so 280mm, 360mm and 420mm setups really do push cooling beyond what an air cooler can handle.

        I’ve played with a couple of 120mm AIOs and they’re a waste of time and money, IMO. At 240mm, AIOs can start to make sense for systems with cramped sockets or limited airflow in that area, but larger radiators take CPU cooling far beyond what even the best air coolers can do if you’re cranking up the voltage and frequency to the utter limit of what your CPU can handle. Just don’t expect your CPU to last more than 18 months if you need that sort of cooling!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      The Wraith Spire is OK with my 1700 up to 3.7Ghz, but I’m sure a Hyper T4 or this thing or similar would let me push it a bit more.

      • south side sammy
      • 3 years ago

      Funny, I’ve been replacing my AiO’s and going back to air. The pumps don’t seem to last long enough and the hoses, depending on what ones they are, all seem to get brittle near the radiators and a multitude of micro fissures pop up over a short span of time and start oozing liquid. Screw that!

        • Redocbew
        • 3 years ago

        I strayed away from watercooling before AIOs became commonly available, but I ended up doing the same thing. Any time I did an upgrade or had to do any kind of significant maintenance I had to drain, tinker, fill, bleed, and so on. It just got tiresome, and it’s expensive. Many of those custom builds that get posted around often contain the cost of a good aircooling setup just in the fittings.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        A big problem with cheaper AIOs is that they use aluminium radiators and copper CPU blocks. With 24/7 operation you’ll find that the CPU block is electroplated within 18 months and you have to RMA or throw it out.

        Worse, they become pretty ineffective long before they become clogged. I’ve seen a 12-month old Corsair H75 that cooled atrociously within a year because it was an alu radiator on a copper block.

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    Freezer? What a stupid name for a cooler, how am I gonna get all my FPS when there’s no ‘gaming’ in the name and no RGBs?

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      I’m not sure why they didn’t just name it Fr33zer.

        • Flying Fox
        • 3 years ago

        “Fr33z3R over 9000!!!” ?

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