Eurocom Sky X9E3 stretches the meaning of ‘laptop’

Eurocom has offered plenty of machines with lots of powerful hardware inside laptop-shaped packages before. Now, the company's Sky X9E3 laptop really stretches the definition of what can be classified as a mobile device, packing a Intel Kaby Lake Core i7-7700K desktop processor, a pair of Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics cards in SLI, and support for up to five internal storage devices.

Buyers can choose from three Intel seventh-generation Core i5 or Core i7 desktop processors. The CPU gets data from up to 64 GB of memory ensconced in four DDR4 SODIMM slots. Three NVMe M.2 drives and two 2.5" SATA drives can come along for the short ride from wall outlet to wall outlet. The big bruiser has a pair of Killer E2400 Gigabit Ethernet jacks along with three antennas for Wi-Fi connectivity.

Eurocom lets buyers choose between Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards, available singly or in SLI pairs. The graphics card (or cards) splatters pretty pictures on one of four different 17.3" displays, ranging from a rather pedestrian 1920×1080 unit with a 60 Hz refresh rate all the way to a 4K display with G-Sync. Interestingly, there's a middle-ground option at 2560×1440 with 120Hz refresh. If the onboard display doesn't pack enough pixels, the Sky X9E3 can connect to up to four external monitors via a pair of DisplayPort connectors, one HDMI jack, and one HDMI or USB 3.1 port.

There are three methods for powering the machine: a single 330W power brick, a pair of 330W units with an additional converter box to tie them together, and a massive 780W charger that weighs 3 lbs (1.3 kg) all by itself. The laptop comes with an eight-cell 89 Wh battery, though given the desktop-class hardware and the specifications of the power bricks, the battery life probably isn't competing with Microsoft's Surface Book Pro.

The Sky X9E3 is available now with prices starting around $2300 with a Core i5 processor, GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card, 16 GB of DDR4 memory, and a 1 TB hard drive. Buyers might also need to spring for a new laptop bag to hold the machine's bulky dimensions of 17.1" x 12.3" x 1.9" (or 43 cm x 31 cm x 4.7 cm) and and 12.1 lb (5.5 kg) weight. Eurocom didn't say if that figure includes the aforementioned giant power brick.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    To answer the question that you’re all asking: With dual 1080s, a 120Hz screen, OS, and 1TB SATA SSD you’ll pay a hefty $5,128.

    This looks silly, but I’ve seen people show up to LAN parties with full tower cases strapped to their backs, so there’s definitely a niche for “technically portable” systems. This is actually much smaller than I would expect for cooling SLI 1080s, and I’d be curious to see if this unit can really handle the thermals.

    • crabjokeman
    • 3 years ago

    No GTX 1080 Ti option? That makes it a little short on the epeen factor.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    There are other manufacturers that seem to be producing nicer high-end whitebooks for laptop resellers now. Clevo is no longer the only game in town and I’m tired of their aesthetic and just-adequate build quality.

    Can anyone identify the OEM for this?
    [url<]https://www.pcspecialist.co.uk/notebooks/proteusIV-15/[/url<]

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      I have friends who evangelize for Clevo based on speed per dollar but end up dealing with form factor, build quality, throttling, etc. Sometimes it’s worth it to pay a premium for mobile hardware that just plain works.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Nah, Clevo are good in this regard; It’s not as if HP, Acer, Dell, Alienware, Gigabyte, Asus, MSI don’t have models that throttle and have flimsy plastics too. You get what you pay for from any vendor.

        I’m mostly tired of the dated chinese aesthetics and their overuse of plastics. They’re good plastics but I want more aluminium, magnesium or carbon fibre.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      I’d like to know who’s doing some of those as well. For some of the other models there they are clearly Clevo/Sager, such as
      [url<]https://www.pcspecialist.co.uk/notebooks/vortexVI-17/[/url<]

      • ludi
      • 3 years ago

      Quanta or Compal or possible alternates, although assuming their websites are updated regularly (big ‘if’) I don’t see a match. Asus and Wistron also do ODM releases. Foxconn might even have a few channel offerings that aren’t necessarily publicized, too.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Ah yes, it’s a Quanta NL8K FHD.
        The Quanta website is as useless as you assumed it was.

        I’m sorely tempted you know, my experience with previous Quantas has been as good as Clevo, but only from a screen/keyboard/chassis quality. I have never had one with a dGPU that required cooling before.

    • Major-Failure
    • 3 years ago

    Does it come with earplugs?

    I bet you’d need them running this thing at 100% load.

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 3 years ago

      But man!! It floats when it’s at 100%!

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      It doesn’t sound like you’re….a fan.

        • southrncomfortjm
        • 3 years ago

        Oh dear. You are now in a time out.

    • AMDisDEC
    • 3 years ago

    I love the reliable 2000hr MTBF!

    • iBend
    • 3 years ago

    6.8Kg with powerbrick?
    My PC is slightly more heavier than that (exclude screen obviously)

      • sreams
      • 3 years ago

      More Heavier

      Great name for a metal band.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        Nahh, more like an alt-rock or grunge band imo. I think the metal band would be “Most Heaviest”. Which is actually a fantastic name for a metal band. Shame I don’t have any gear anymore.

    • DavidC1
    • 3 years ago

    Since even the ultrabooks have crappy battery life when gaming and doesn’t really quality as a mobile device, at least with these devices you get the performance after paying several grand on it.

    You know what would be cool?

    Take an SFF standard,
    -Make it wide enough to integrate keyboard and TouchPad
    -Keep the upgradability
    -Have a slot for small battery, maybe 30 mins just for hauling between rooms

    You get the upgradability of a desktop and mobility of a laptop without paying DTR prices. It’s a perfect LAN party setup. DTRs are used in exactly the way I described anyway. Things like NUCs are almost there but you still need plug in too many cords before moving it. We know no manufacturers are going to make truly customisable laptops anyway.

      • Thrashdog
      • 3 years ago

      A Thin Mini-ITX case sized to match a 24 inch screen on a fold-down VESA mount wouldn’t be the worst thing ever. With the recent proliferation of small-run custom cases, it might even be a real possibility.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    Of all the Clevo / Sager/ Origin/ Eurocom vendors I’ve looked at, Eurocom always had a ridiculously huge mark up vs. the others. For example, a 64GB 2400MHz RAM option at Eurocom is $892 while a similar option at Origin PC is $518. I would do sample build comparisons and just laugh at the total that came up at Eurocom.

    EDIT: Added “RAM”

      • ExpatZ
      • 2 years ago

      Which is why you buy the base model with a super cheap second drive to get the mount kit and the SLI GPU setup.
      The GPU cards costs are on par with everyone else and the rest are bog standard parts that can be sourced elsewhere on the cheap.
      Still runs £4000 with the 780W brick but saves over £1500 on a fully loaded system once all the options have been installed.

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    What I would love to see in a laptop is a Xeon D. If they can fit a desktop Core i5/i7 into that chassis, why not that server chip with more cores, more PCIe lanes and similar thermal constraints? As a bonus, it has two on-die 10 Gbit controllers and everything would be connected to the main chip instead of having much of the IO handing off of the chipset. Going with the Xeon D also permits higher capacity registered SO-DIMMs so there is a capacity advantage there too.

      • DavidC1
      • 3 years ago

      They can’t market it as a gaming device though. That would limit TAM quite a bit.

    • Thrashdog
    • 3 years ago

    I used to work for a design firm that bought DTR “laptops” like this for their graphics people, because at some point in the dark ages of history somebody declared that all users needed to have laptops in case they needed to work from home. They cost two or three times as much as an equally-capable desktop would have cost, broke more often, and were harder to repair. After all that I don’t think any of them ever left the desks they were set on.

    That department paid a pretty hefty “stupid tax” on IT, but they were specialists in their field and pulled in ridiculous fees as a result, so they could afford some extra overhead.

      • kuraegomon
      • 3 years ago

      They could probably have bought desktop workstations _and_ sensible laptops for significantly less, and then let users VNC/RDP from their laptops into their workstations via VPN. Assuming employees weren’t actually travelling, that would have worked out fine from a latency standpoint.

        • Thrashdog
        • 3 years ago

        I pitched VDI to the senior sysadmin a few times, but I could never get him to bite. He was a bit older, and had come into the position from the design side of the firm, so he had a natural wariness of complicated solutions like VDI or RDP gateways. Heck, after I left he rolled back all of the Group Policy settings I’d implemented for my branch office so the he could re-implement them in a way that made sense to him, through a logon script. Not even joking.

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      working from home means hardly working. thats why.

      but i get why they did it. if it breaks, then they still have their jobs because its an open ticket, and that shows they are doing something.

        • ChicagoDave
        • 3 years ago

        I work from home (one day a week), as do all of my co-workers and tons of clients and friends.

        Maybe [b<]you[/b<] hardly work at home, but I certainly get more done at home than in the cube. The same could be said about everyone I know, many of whom work at home full time. Benefits include: no one stopping by to chat, no overheard conversations or loud talkers, no commute, food 15 seconds away, bathroom 15 seconds away, coffee that tastes good 15 seconds away and essentially free. Just on the commute alone I gain 2 hours of working time. Plus since I can turn off at any point I tend to work a bit later, whereas at the office I'm out the door within 2-3 minutes of 5:00.

      • ExpatZ
      • 2 years ago

      I do DevOps and OpenStack design so this is actually a small solution for me to take on my contracts. Of course I have no need for the SLI but I am opting for it anyway because who doesn’t want to play Fallout 4 while being stuck in a hotel room for weeks at a time?

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    Still smaller and lighter than the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_Portable<]Mac Portable.[/url<]

    • NTMBK
    • 3 years ago

    Looks about as portable as the thing from Halt And Catch Fire.

      • eofpi
      • 3 years ago

      And the Cardiff Giant is less likely to land you in the burn ward if you actually use it on your lap.

    • Derfer
    • 3 years ago

    “a pair of Killer E2400”

    So I take it this isn’t meant to be a mobile workstation.

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    More like lapcrusher.

    • bthylafh
    • 3 years ago

    I’ll be in my bunk.

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