Corsair K63 tenkeyless keyboard will save you space and money

If your time at the computer is spent primarily for entertainment rather than work, you might not need all the 104 keys provided by a full-size keyboard. If you're a gamer, though, you probably still want a sleek, feature-packed mechanical keyboard. If that's the case, then Corsair has your back with its K63 mechanical gaming keyboard.

The K63 sports many of the bells and whistles found on other Corsair keyboards, but in a compact form factor for those looking for a bit more desk space. Beneath the keycaps, you'll find Cherry MX Red mechanical keyswitches with red LED lighting throughout. Like other Corsair keyboards, the K63 can be programmed in all sorts of different ways using Corsair's CUE software, including setting up per-key lighting and different lighting patterns (just so long as you like the color red), and almost-limitless number of macros and key reprogramming options.

Many tenkeyless boards like Logitech's recent G Pro take the notion of cutting the fat off the board to an extreme, dropping media keys and other niceties, but Corsair seems to be aiming the K63 at a more middle-of-the-road crowd. The K63 has dedicated media playback and volume controls butttons and a couple extra buttons for toggling the lighting and disabling the Windows key to keep it from interrupting gaming sessions.

Corsair is selling the board at its online store for a pretty-affordable $79.99.

Comments closed
    • Generic
    • 3 years ago

    Go ahead and lop off the remaining three columns of keys if your creating a compact dedicated gaming board.

    Arrow keys? What, am I playing OGL Doom over here!?

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    why didnt they just offer it as a separate attachment? its a number pad, nothing more.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I see the headline and immediately read ‘K6-3’.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Tenkeyless is great for gaming. I can keep my arms closer together (better for ergonomics) *and* can pan left without running into the numpad.

    Sucks when I have to enter numbers, though.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      More manufacturers need to start moving these keys to the left hand side rather than omitting them entirely.

    • TheEmrys
    • 3 years ago

    What is this abomination?

    I live and die by a good 10-key. Spreadsheets and games, but I couldn’t live without them. I won’t even buy a laptop that lacks a 10-key.

      • Meadows
      • 3 years ago

      Which is why you should not have commented on this news piece in the first place.

    • Phr3dly
    • 3 years ago

    What you must mean is “if your time at the computer is not spent primarily doing accounting, you might not need all 104 keys…”

    I don’t know anybody who uses the numpad and I sit on a floor full of programmers, in a building full of programmers, on a campus filled with programmers, in a company filled with programmers. I’d be curious what percentage of computer users, whether professional or not, use the numpad. I used mine a lot more at home for balancing my checkbook than I ever did for work.

    Going ten-key-less was the best thing I’ve done for my ergonomics.

      • superjawes
      • 3 years ago

      Engineer here. A numpad is incredibly useful when entering part numbers, prices, PO numbers, work orders…I enter a lot of different numbers.

      I would probably be better off with a tenkeyless + separate number pad for ergo, but I would rather deal with a “full” keyboard to keep my numpad.

        • Major-Failure
        • 3 years ago

        + passwords, IBANs, and phone numbers.

        Personally, I rarely if ever use the regular number keys to enter numbers. Maybe when typing a long text, but other than that, nope. At any rate, extra keys is always better because you have more buttons to assign shortcuts to in software you’re using.

        Also, 80 bucks for this? I’ll pass 🙂

        • Generic
        • 3 years ago

        +1 for engineering work

        As a mechanical designer (drafter) who lives in Excel, CAD, and ERP software; I would literally refuse to do my job without a 10 key, and it’s easy access to math operators.

        I’d rather the number row be the symbols row by default now that I think about it.

      • Stochastic
      • 3 years ago

      I never got in the habit of using the numpad, even when having to do data entry. I probably *should* learn to use the numpad quickly as I’m sure in the long run it would save me time, but on the flipside having a more compact keyboard would be nice.

      • slowriot
      • 3 years ago

      Tenkeyless for life. Why do you need a numpad when there’s already an entire row dedicated to numbers?

        • Meadows
        • 3 years ago

        Because that row is slow to use and you can’t use it without looking. Neither of which is true for the numpad.

          • slowriot
          • 3 years ago

          It’s not faster to remove your right hand from the home row in order to enter numbers. If you could develop the muscle memory for the numpad the row should be even easier. Considering you already use it to handle symbols.

      • Meadows
      • 3 years ago

      I use it very regularly and I don’t even work as a programmer.

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 3 years ago

      I have a 60% keyboard at home and I bring a TKL to work. I’m actually on the verge of getting rid of the 60% because I miss having the dedicated F-keys and Home/End/PgUp/PgDn, and keeping three keyboard layouts in my head (Mac laptop, TKL, and 60%) is just a bit too much.

      Best decision getting rid of the numpad, though. I did miss it when I have to enter numbers, but it doesn’t really slow me down that much.

      • TwistedKestrel
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve spent a few years in the past doing data entry, and TKL keyboards feel REALLY weird to me. It’s like my right hand is missing three fingers or something. In my normal daily life, I still barely ever use the numpad (can still punch in numerical data lickety split!) but locating my right hand at the end of a TKL keyboard instead of right of center just feels like I’m using the keyboard wrong.

      • Cannonaire
      • 3 years ago

      I used to use the numpad a lot at work mostly entering PO numbers. I ended up using it with either hand because of how I needed to hold things sometimes. Even though I don’t do anything like that anymore, I still use my numpad for most typing that is entirely numbers.

      I would love to have a tenkeyless and a separate numpad, which I would put on the left side of my keyboard. If only Corsair made a tenkeyless with Cherry MX Silent switches…

      • Captain Ned
      • 3 years ago

      Joined the financial industry in 1986. Spent 10 years as a banker, and now 20+ years as a regulator. I will stick you if you try to take away my 10-keypad (also, as others know here, I’m a hardcore IBM Model M user). Hell, I’ve even got a real 10-key in a bottom drawer for those occasions when you really need to show the tape for an audit trail.

      Worst thing that ever happened to real 10-keys was the double-zero button. Bad, sick, & wrong, and the usual cause of “WTF” when pressing the Total button.

      • kmieciu
      • 3 years ago

      ADOM. Crawl. Angband. Numpad is essential for all my roguelikes. Even my laptop have numpad.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Programmers[/quote<] Well there's your problem. When I was in Real Engineering I used the numpad regularly. Since switching to software fulltime I have little use for it anymore.

      • rwburnham
      • 3 years ago

      I work as a graphic designer and I use the numpad on my iMac’s keyboard all the time. It just feels better for typing in dimensions. At home on my secondary PC I use the numpad to balance my checkbook. On my main PC, which is mainly for games, I rarely use the numpad so I could see myself getting a keyboard like this. Desktop space is valuable.

      • Goty
      • 3 years ago

      Put me in the “programmer who likes his/her numpad” group.

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