EVGA SC17 1070 laptop orders up 4K and G-Sync to go

Just yesterday, we reported on an AOC monitor with 4K resolution and support for Nvidia's G-Sync. If cramming 3840×2160 pixels and Nvidia's variable refresh rate technology into a 27" panel isn't impressive enough for you, perhaps the pixel density in the 17" 4K G-Sync display in EVGA's SC17 1070 gaming laptop will be satisfactory. The mobile gaming station packs an Intel sixth-generation Core i7-6820HK CPU, a Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070, and 32 GB of system memory to go with that UHD panel.

Laptops in the 17" class are never compact, but the SC17 justifies its size by bringing a lot of hardware along for the ride. The system boots from a 256GB M.2 NVMe SSD, but also carries a 2.5" HDD for 1TB of additional storage. The keyboard is a full-sized affair with a number pad and white LED backlighting. If the built-in 4K display isn't enough, the machine has an HDMI 2.0 jack and a pair of mini DisplayPort connectors. The Gigabit Ethernet and 802.11ac Wi-Fi controllers are both Intel units. The laptop packs a pair of USB 3.0 ports and a USB 3.1 Type-C port.

EVGA is quite proud of the tweaking features built into the SC17 1070, claiming that the machine has a "full BIOS" implementation with overclocking capabilities. When those overclocking experiments go awry, a hardware CMOS clear button should make it easy for the user to put things back to factory settings. The manufacturer says the SC17 1070 is bloatware-free, a claim that saddens me that it has to be mentioned at all.

The EVGA SC17 1070 is available now in the company's online store for $2550. For the time being, that price also includes an EVGA Torq X10 gaming mouse and a backpack that hopefully can swallow up the machine's 16.1" x 11.6" x 1.1" (41 cm x 30 cm x 2.7 cm) dimensions and 9 lb (4.1 kg) bulk.

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    • mkk
    • 3 years ago

    Now I dislike gaming laptops in general, but yeah a 1440p screen at around 100Hz or more would have made great practical sense here. 4K is just a checkbox feature.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    This is where I post my standard rant against 4K screens in gaming laptops:
    -Dramatically shortens an already-strained battery life? Check.
    -Kills the primary purpose of the machine, by pairing a 1070 with a resolution that a 1070 cannot ever hope to run? Check.
    -Ruins usability in any application or game with a hardcoded UI size? Check.
    -Inflates the price tag until this product is no longer competitive with its peers? Check.

    Just because Apple loves to cram high-resolution displays in everything doesn’t mean that your windows gaming company needs to do the same to be “premium” hardware. Apple doesn’t expect people to play games on their machines. Just give us 1080P or 1440P as an option, please.

    It’s amusing that TechReport pushes the 4K screen as a boon rather than a bust on this product.

      • vshade
      • 3 years ago

      With High enough DPI it’s really hard to notice that you are playing games in non-native resolution, although windows applications running badly in scaled mode is true and apple can get away with it cause it had a better scaling solution to boot(better for handling third party apps)

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 3 years ago

        Disagree on personal opinion experience.

        But I also can pick the sub-pixels out 4.5″ 720p displays (Pentile AMOled and Regular LED) and in some 1080p devices 5-6″ when using them.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      1440p would probably be better matched with the 1070 in a laptop for most demanding usage.

      And no suffer as much from Windows Terribly inconsistent scaling

      • EzioAs
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<] -Kills the primary purpose of the machine, by pairing a 1070 with a resolution that a 1070 cannot ever hope to run?[/quote<] That's just plain wrong.

        • Kretschmer
        • 3 years ago

        [url<]https://techreport.com/review/30413/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1070-graphics-card-reviewed/7[/url<] The DESKTOP 1070 struggles to hit 60 FPS @ 1440P in many games, and you expect the laptop version to push +125% the pixels at an acceptable frame rate? I guess if you're happy with 30FPS, then it would be a good fit..

          • EzioAs
          • 3 years ago

          Reviewers usually benches video cards with pretty demanding AAA games and they usually set the image quality to close to max settings. Thus, what usually shows are close to a worst case scenario for the GPU. In other words, if you drop the settings down for a little bit and/or you don’t always play demanding games, for the most part you’re going to get good balance between framerate and image quality even at 4k.

          However, what really bothers me is your point that clearly says the 1070 can’t ever hope to run 3840×2160, which like I said earlier, is just plain wrong.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            On some older games, sure. My 1070 can push 4K (via DSR) in Diablo 3 and StarCraft 2 with all the settings cranked to the max. It can’t do that in GTA5 acceptably, though. I either have to drop detail or drop the resolution, and I’d rather run it at 1440p with max details than 4K with console quality levels.

            • Kretschmer
            • 3 years ago

            It was poor wording, but I don’t think any reader interpreted my words as implying that games just wouldn’t boot with a GTX 1070 in the room. Fact is the GTX 1070 will struggle to run today’s graphically demanding games at high-quality settings at 4K. Better?

            • EzioAs
            • 3 years ago

            Yes 🙂

          • renz496
          • 3 years ago

          you raised some valid point but isn’t that why EVGA put Gsync on that laptop to deal with the game smoothness at low frame rate?

            • Kretschmer
            • 3 years ago

            GSync helps, but 35 FPS will still be 35 FPS.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Definitely a bust.

      We know from TR’s recent 1080Ti review that even the [i<]desktop[/i<] 1080 isn't quite enough for a smooth 4K experience. When I get high-dpi laptops at work, the first thing I do it change the resolution back to something aproaching sensible DPI. All the content the laptop is likely to be used with will function better at the 900p-1200p resolutions that result in a sensible sub-150ppi. So many everyday, critical applications are [i<]still[/i<] not capable of dpi scaling properly. Microsoft can try all they want to make the OS scale better, but the rest of the world has a long ways to go still.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      otoh no sane person buys a gaming laptop so the product is perfect match for prospective buyers. It may not be a true gaming machine but it is a bragging one. For a month;)

        • brucek2
        • 3 years ago

        What is it that a traveling sane gamer would purchase instead?

        These machines are a little larger and heavier than ideal, and have no battery life, but they are still a lot more practical than dragging around a monitor, keyboard and SFF desktop.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    That’s a half-decent looking laptop.

    It’s just a shame that it costs 50% more than similar options from Gigabyte, MSI, and Asus.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      If you can show me these mythical $1600-1700 4K adaptive-sync laptops with overclockable i7 CPUs please do.

      Cutting to 1080p and non-overclockable CPU I can see it.

        • brucek2
        • 3 years ago

        Which is interesting – if it’s really a 50% premium for those two items, I’d be very interested to know what the overclockable headroom really is (given heat throttling) and how many if any games will be playable at 4K resolution vs at 1080p anyway. My guess is there’s basically no way this adds up favorably unless you have a specific application that works much better for you at 4K vs 1080p and that advantage holds up even on just a 17″ screen.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 3 years ago

          Heat throttling is a nonissue for this laptop. And quiet a few other newer gaming laptops.

          I do think 4K is a waste. And I certainly think the premium is not worth it.

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            Not sure why you’re getting downvoted, 4K is absolutely a waste for a 1070.

            Maybe it can push 45fps in some 2013 games, but that was four years ago!

            • brucek2
            • 3 years ago

            Let me rephrase. What would you expect the practical achievable overclocks to be on this model, and how does that performance compare to the laptops not costing 50% more?

            As a rough guess would maybe 10% performance for 50% cost sound like the right ballpark?

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 3 years ago

            To me it would be peak performance.
            They all Have a mode for 3.8Ghz already.

            4-4.5Ghz should be possible. $750-1000 premium over similar desktop setup for the ability to be easily portable.

            For me, if I needed that much performance, the premium would be easy to justify.

            Anyone buying a laptop to sit at home as a desktop should buy a desktop and the largest UPS possible. Still come out ahead on money!

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Puh-lease, the “overclockable” is just a marketing con you’ve fallen afoul of.

        Nobody is overclocking anything when both the CPU and a GTX 1070 have to share a couple of 50mm low-profile fans. I’d be absolutely staggered if at least one of the CPU or GPU didn’t throttle at stock speeds!

        As for G-Sync in a laptop? Just google “G-Sync Laptop”. Over here in the EU there is plenty of [i<]more powerful, higher-spec[/i<] choice at under €1500 (thanks to sales, discounts etc) but if you want specific examples, the HP omen 17, Acer Predator range and MSI Stealth range ALL have G-Sync options at €1500 or lower list prices, and don't forget about the fact that the rest of the world includes tax. For the EU that's another 20% over the values we're talking about in USD here!

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 3 years ago

          I think you have missed that in the last year or two has been the rise of gaming laptops keeping hardware pretty cool.
          This is a review of the older EVGA laptop before display bump:
          [url<]http://www.notebookcheck.net/EVGA-SC17-GTX-1070-Notebook-Review.184533.0.html[/url<] <70C for real world. Performance just under reference desktop 1070. If you want to turn it up and hit 80C+ when plugged in at home, seems fine. CPU suffers more, but it does have a build in working 3.8Ghz mode. With fan boost under "gaming load" of uningine unreal valley, both GPU and CPU kept under 70C. Would I ever spend the extra money on it? No. Do I understand why people would, yes. And for the configuration we are looking at, the cost is fine.

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            Thanks for the review link.

            I’d never call 53dB “quiet” but I know plenty of people who wouldn’t care about that noise, and it’s actually reasonable cooling considering how thin it is. I guess the cooling system quality is what makes it so heavy for a thin laptop.

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 3 years ago

            You are very welcome 🙂

            I feel like some website, here or elsewhere should investigate what finally had gaming laptop makers start to care about keeping cool. Good thing, be interested to know if it was funded at least in part by Nvidia.

            I have a laptop which hits around 50dB. Never a problem in games as have headphones. Few times I have used external speakers after I got used to the sound I blocked it out.

            Consistency is key here. Had to deal with a laptop which jumped from nothing to ~40 to ~45 than back down. Every other minute

            Sounds like the default fan on this EVGA has similar issues, in normal gaming modulating from 43 to 48 dB.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, while we can argue regarding the need for a gaming laptop, this one does not look odd at least.

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