Biostar X370GTN is the first Ryzen Mini-ITX motherboard

Just like it was the first to race out of the gate with Ryzen-ready AM4 motherboards, Biostar is again first to market with a Socket AM4 board in mini-ITX form factor. The X370GTN just showed up on the company's website, and as its name implies, it uses the X370 chipset. Despite its small size, the X370GTN is a fairly full-featured motherboard, with a USB 3.1 Type-C port, a back-mounted PCIe x4 M.2 socket, and two DDR4 DIMMs supporting transfer rates up to 3200 MT/s.

Biostar's choice of the X370 chipset is a little unusual for such a small mobo. AMD previously announced that the X300 and A300 chipsets would be intended for small-form-factor machines. This particular board doesn't take advantage of all of the benefits of X370, like PCIe lane bifurcation (for multi-GPU configurations) and extra SATA ports.

Even still, you get two USB 3.1 ports, four USB 3.0 connectors, four SATA 6Gbps ports, and a full-size PCIe x16 slot in addition to the aforementioned M.2 socket. The board includes HDMI 1.4 and DVI-D connectors, although as with other Ryzen boards, you'll have to step down to a Bristol Ridge APU to make use of them. Realtek supplies both LAN and audio chips for this board. Finally, Biostar furnishes the X370GTN with Vivid LED DJ support along with a pair of 5050 LED lightstrip headers.

Since Biostar quietly added the X370GTN's product page to its site, we don't yet know how much it will cost nor when it will be available. Given the limited availability of Ryzen motherboards, you may want to consider snapping this up if you see it in stock.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Just curious. A lot of these AM4 boards feature support for Bristol Ridge but a quick Google search doesn’t seem to pull up any results for vendors peddling those APUs. I understand demand must be pretty low and AMD would be right to focus on Ryzen at this time, and anyone who’s looking to build a cheap APU box can easily get an A8-7600 and get essentially the same thing (just a ‘good enough’ box for grandma. Still, Bristol Ridge channel availability was supposed to come late last year, but it seems AMD is quietly putting it to pasture.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      I get your point dude, but the fact that it might be “good enough” for “grandma” does not make it good. Anyone buying or building a PC right now should avoid what AMD calls an APU until they get around to creating one based on Ryzen. We’ll just have to wait and see how performance and power usage shake out when that happens. If you’re such a fanboy for them I don’t know why you’re even talking about it.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 3 years ago

        I would have liked to see the last version of Dozer put through some benchmarks. If you can go by the wattage ratings, they made good progress on performance per watt without changing process tech, and the GPU was clocked significantly higher than before. It also has DDR4 RAM, but I gathered that they sort of hacked it on, rather than re-engineered to allow more throughput (which would be handy for an APU). Also since it uses the AM4 platform, the chipsets are fresh.

        I would not be afraid of such an APU if I happened to be in the market for a machine which would not have dedicated graphics. Well, then again I like good Linux support and it seems that Intel graphics are supported best of all…

          • Redocbew
          • 3 years ago

          That’s exactly my point. Performance isn’t the only sticking point, so the fact that something might be able to play farmville just as well as any other CPU around doesn’t automagically balance the scales.

    • Amien
    • 3 years ago

    Why X370? My understanding is that the only thing the top chipset really offers is support for multi-GPUs. What’s the point if its that small and has only 1 slot?

      • willg
      • 3 years ago

      I was thinking the same thing. AMD also has the X300 ‘chipset’ for SFF. Which appears to be a very small bootstrap for the processor basically and contains no other I/O. So relies entirely on the I/O of the SoC but it keeps the overclocking and crossfire/SLI support of the X370. I Iike the idea of the reduced cost, size and complexity potential of an ITX board utilising this chipset. However, I can’t seem to find a definitive answer to the question what I/O does the Ryzen SoC support natively in regards to USB version and generation

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Hope this helps.

        [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/11170/the-amd-zen-and-ryzen-7-review-a-deep-dive-on-1800x-1700x-and-1700/13[/url<]

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      I’m GUESSING they just want this board to look good on the spec sheet.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 3 years ago

      Maybe X300 isn’t available in sufficient quantities yet?

        • Redocbew
        • 3 years ago

        As far as we can tell, it’s not available in any quantity. It makes sense to have A300 around for cheapo, bargain basement systems and to let Bristol Ridge live out the rest of its days. I don’t understand why X300 exists at all.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah it’s a little silly. There’s been plenty of mini-ITX boards using chipsets that would otherwise be capable of supporting more than one PCIe slot, but a B350 mini-ITX board could easily be functionally identical to this one without sacrificing many features to fit the form factor.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 3 years ago

      If you’re concerned that the X370 chipset is wasted on a mini-ITX motherboard, you might prefer the BioStar [url=http://www.biostar.com.tw/app/en/mb/introduction.php?S_ID=878<]B350GTN[/url<], instead. [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=118885&start=150#p1341603[/url<]

        • Amien
        • 3 years ago

        Thank you! I’m sure it’s cheaper, which was my main concern.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 3 years ago

        Ah, the sensible option. The motherboard shrinks to minimalist platform on which to mount a monster 8 core CPU. I would have no purpose for so many cores, bit there is something appealing about it.

      • Boon
      • 3 years ago

      They’re using the extra pcie lanes for the usb 3.1 gen2 ports. Neither the B350 nor the x300 have the bandwidth.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        X370 and B350 chipsets have two USB 3.1 ports natively. See [url=https://techreport.com/news/31228/amd-shows-off-ryzen-ready-chipsets-and-motherboards-at-ces<]here[/url<].

    • G8torbyte
    • 3 years ago

    Remember Abit? I read somewhere a few years ago that when Abit reorganized and stopped making motherboards that some of the engineers went on to form Biostar.
    I fondly remember building an AMD socket 939 system on an Abit AN8-32X:

    [url<]https://techreport.com/review/9681/abit-an8-32x-motherboard/2[/url<]

      • deruberhanyok
      • 3 years ago

      I still have an abit motherboard box for misc parts. I can’t bring myself to toss it out.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      I feel like Abit and Biostar occupy opposite ends of the spectrum though.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        Aw, I dunno. Like Abit, Biostar motherboards tend to be flakey-but-interesting.

          • ozzuneoj
          • 3 years ago

          My thoughts exactly. Also I have 3 or 4 old Abit boxes, is awesome seeing the logos for lots of old hardware review sites from ~2000.

          • slowriot
          • 3 years ago

          I welcome it. Motherboard companies don’t have the level of freedom to do truly crazy stuff anymore.

          I had an ASRock Core 2 Duo motherboard that supported DDR or DDR2 and also PCIe Gen1 or AGP. I used all of those options over a couple years too! Surprisingly stable as well.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Some Abit folks probably ended up at Biostar but they couldn’t have formed Biostar because Biostar was founded in 1986. Asus was 1989, for comparison. 🙂

    • Star Brood
    • 3 years ago

    Will the Zen APUs utilize the same socket? Cause this could be the start of the first IGP-based HTPC that can actually game if so.

      • Goty
      • 3 years ago

      Yes, they will use the same socket (otherwise it would be a little strange for the mobo manufacturers to include display outputs on these boards, no?)

        • Star Brood
        • 3 years ago

        Thanks, very rational as well. What a time to be in the market!

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        Well, not really. After all, there are already Bristol Ridge APUs for Socket AM4.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 3 years ago

      You could actually do this with Iris Pro. There were the two Broadwell parts that were released (i5-5675c and i7-5775c) if you were lucky enough to find one / crazy enough to spend the exorbitant asking price, and also the Skull Canyon NUC (NUC6i7KYK). 1080p with medium-ish detail settings works pretty well as long as you’re not trying to play the latest and greatest.

      some benchmarks here: [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/10343/the-intel-skull-canyon-nuc6i7kyk-minipc-review/4[/url<] annoyingly, a lot of the 1080p scores are also at "extreme" quality settings, whatever that means, but a few towards the bottom of the page show decent performance at 1080p. That said, I'm hoping that the combination of new onboard GPU and faster memory speeds make that level of IGP performance more affordable. Really curious to see how they stack up to Iris with the onboard memory. I don't think we'll see them quite approach console level but it should be a good increase from the previous generation. (if AMD were to drop even just a single stack of HBM on there for the IGP it would be a real game changer for APU performance. But as much as I'd love to see that, I don't think it will happen with the first generation parts.)

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