Ryzen motherboard availability check: come and get them

So it's been another three weeks and change since we looked into Ryzen motherboard availability, and the situation was tricky. There were previous reports that a few manufacturers would be getting more stock into stores soon. Well, at least over at Newegg, that appears to be the case. No less than a total of sixteen Socket AM4 motherboards are currently in stock at the 'egg. They're going in and out of stock as we write, though, so grab them while they're hot.

MSI has the most variety on offer. Six boards from the company are in stock, from the range-topping X370 XPower Gaming Titanium and its dual M.2 sockets down to the relatively humble B350M Gaming Pro. The B350M Mortar Arctic is probably our value pick from this set thanks to four DIMM slots, USB Type-C connector, and $95 price tag—not to mention that slick white color scheme. The full list of MSI's boards on offer includes:

The next-biggest purveyor of Ryzen-ready motherboards at Newegg is Gigabyte, who has five boards in stock. The top-end Aorus AX370-Gaming K7 offers dual ALC1220 audio codecs, a quartet of USB 3.1 connectors, and both U.2 and M.2 sockets for $210. Down at the other end of the range, Gigabyte offers the GA-AB350M-D23H with 4 DIMM sockets and Gigabyte's Dual BIOS for just $90. Gigabyte's boards on offer include:

Biostar has three Socket AM4 boards in stock right now at Newegg, and two of them are on sale. The X370GT5 looks like it could suit a certain kind of builder just fine with its wide array of legacy I/O—it's $20 off right now, bringing it to $130. Meanwhile, the B350GT5 isn't far behind in terms of functionality, and it's down to $105. Those sale prices end tomorrow, so move quick if you want one. Here's the list of Biostar Ryzen boards at Newegg:

 

Asus has a whole bunch of listings on Newegg, but most of them are sold out. Only two boards are available from the boys with the hard-to-pronounce name. The Prime X370-Pro is a full-featured board with eight SATA ports, a trio of PCIe x16 slots, and an Intel Ethernet controller. Newegg asks $160 for that board. On the other side of the coin, the Prime B350M-A/CSM is a Micro-ATX motherboard from Asus' Corporate Stable Model line that offers just the basics for $90.

Asus isn't the only company with sold-out listings. ASRock doesn't have any boards in stock with Newegg itself as of this writing. You can still pick up one of its boards on the Newegg Marketplace, though. The Marketplace has more motherboards from the other companies, too. However, many of them are selling well over Newegg's own prices. Caveat emptor.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I think a re-review of Ryzen should be in order once BIOS and drivers are sorted out. Maybe after 6 months being on the market? I understand Ryzen was kinda rushed to market and board makers didn’t have time to polish their boards. Lisa Su did say before that Ryzen will have a hard launch and I think it was a little too hard.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve done informal testing of a lot of new firmware and software updates as they’ve arrived and the differences (if any) have been within 1-2% of our original results. Running our benchmarks on Ryzen with the Windows 10 Creators Update has shown the same thing: little or no change in performance.

      The idea that there is some huge Ryzen performance increase waiting to be unlocked (outside of possible software optimizations) is basically false hope at this point.

    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    Just to remind you that the AM4 platform was launched quite some time ago for the Bulldozer-based APUs [url<]https://techreport.com/review/30619/amd-unwraps-its-seventh-generation-desktop-apus-and-am4-platform[/url<] So, it shouldn't have been a complete surprise for the MB engineers. Now, I understand the fact that Ryzen is a new CPU and that, apparently, the launch was a bit hastier than usual. Nevertheless, my feeling is that the manufacturers really did underestimate demand.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Looking at this from a Taiwanese guy point of view, I think they simply didn’t want to have a repeat of the Bulldozer AM3+ scenario where they released their AM3+ offerings with no Bulldozer CPUs to put in them, and then when Bulldozer finally came out no one wanted it. That was probably tough on them, and any new AMD platform rollout would understandably be deemed quite risky because AMD may not meet deadlines or performance expectations.

    • homerdog
    • 3 years ago

    Have they sorted out the issue where you can’t run faster than 2133 memory if all 4 of the slots are populated? I remember having a similar thing happen with my old S939 rig, when I added 2 more sticks I had to lower my memory speed to make it stable.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      The official AMD recommendation is 2133MHz, however several manufacturers can manage better than that. Your luck will vary depending on the exact MB model and especially the quality of the RAM sticks (single-sided Samsung B seem to be the best). I believe the Asus Crosshair VI is the only one that can reliably hit 2666 when all 4 slots are populated, but I could be mistaken.

      I wouldn’t expect 3000 or more on all 4 slots without extreme tweaking and/or a lot of luck.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    we need more options. the intel 200 series platform has almost 500 boards to choose from.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 3 years ago

      These lineups won’t be complete until Asus has 40 motherboards based on the X370 chipset alone.

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      500 channels and still nothing to watch.

      ……

      Oh, we’re talking about motherboards.

      ……

      I stand by my former statement.

    • Boon
    • 3 years ago

    My ASRock x370 gaming k4 literally just arrived on my door step 5 minutes ago, lol. I took a chance and bought it from an e-tailer on eBay. It turns out, the order was fulfilled by SuperBiiz.com.

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 3 years ago

    Hoping an MSI B350 PC MATE makes its way into a reviewer’s hands soon… seems like a Tomahawk, without all the “gamer” crap

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 3 years ago

    For folks that need fewer than 7 slots, I’ve been keeping up with the sensibly sized AM4 boards here:
    [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=118885&start=150#p1341603[/url<]

      • tay
      • 3 years ago

      hehe nice. I like the Asus & Biostora & ASRock locating the m.2 slot above the gfx slot rather than under buried by the cooler.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 3 years ago

    Any idea why the boards are so hard to get in stock? Is there an issue with the chips or is Ryzen demand that much higher than expected?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Demand is much higher than expected all the way around. Rumors are that AMD also jumped the gun a little bit with the release and board vendors weren’t ready with firmware and such, which is why we’re seeing significant changes in performance with BIOS updates.

        • DancinJack
        • 3 years ago

        jumped the gun a little

        Understatement of the year!

          • MOSFET
          • 3 years ago

          Understatement = true. However…I read the plea from the unnamed mobo manufacturer, too, and while it’s just Engrish enough to be believeable, I don’t. I do believe that everyone on Earth involved in any way with Ryzen and its associated market knew fully one year ago when it would launch, to within a month.

        • Shobai
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]which is why we're seeing significant changes in performance with BIOS updates.[/quote<] I'm a little late to the party, but how do you reconcile this with what Jeff says about seeing little to no performance improvement?

      • blastdoor
      • 3 years ago

      Just a guess, but…

      Perhaps experience has taught the motherboard makers that the greater risk with AMD is that the CPU will ship later rather than earlier, and that it will disappoint more than impress. So motherboard makers don’t want to get stuck with a warehouse full of unsellable inventory.

      As a result, perhaps the motherboard makers are reacting to demand rather than anticipating demand. In other words, if the customers come, they will build it. But they’re not going to build it and hope that the customers come.

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