Asus readies a salvo of ROG peripherals and networking gear

At its Outshine the Competition event in Berlin, Asus revealed a few ROG-themed peripherals and accessories to go with its graphics cards and monitors. Among those accessories are the highly-customizable ROG Pugio mouse, the ROG Areion 10-Gigabit Ethernet adapter, and the ROG Rapture GT-AC5300 wireless router.

Like EpicGear's Morpha X mouse, the Pugio has socketed, replaceable switches for the main two buttons. Unlike EpicGear's rodent, though, the Pugio is ambidextrous, with special magnetic thumb buttons that can be swapped from one side to the other. The Pugio doesn't have the Morpha X's fancy swappable sensors, though. The sensor that Asus chose is an optical model with 7200-DPI resolution.

The ROG Areion has to be one of the more unusual recent products aimed at gamers. Harking back to the Killer NIC of yesteryear, the ROG Areion is a 10-Gigabit Ethernet adapter with a full-coverage heatsink and a PCI Express 3.0 x4 connection. Asus suggests that gamers who are tired of waiting on ever-larger game installs could benefit from the faster network speeds. The card is based on an Aquantic controller that also supports the intermediate 2.5-Gbps and 5-Gbps Ethernet standards.

Finally, the ROG Rapture GT-AC5300 appears to be the crown jewel of Asus' router offerings. This vaguely-arachnoid device sports a quad-core CPU and a gigabyte of RAM. It has a 4×4 antenna array with MU-MIMO functionality. The Rapture supports 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi as well as two simultaneous channels of 5 GHz Wi-Fi. The nine RJ-45 connections all support Gigabit speed, and there's link aggregation on tap. Naturally, given its ROG branding, the Rapture router allows users to carefully micro-manage network traffic prioritization.

Asus says the Areion network card will be available this month, but is tight-lipped on pricing and availability for the rest of the new stuff.

Comments closed
    • deruberhanyok
    • 3 years ago

    [i<] the Pugio is ambidextrous, with special magnetic thumb buttons that can be swapped from one side to the other[/i<] Okay, that's a neat trick. Well done Asus. [i<]the ROG Areion is a 10-Gigabit Ethernet adapter with a full-coverage heatsink and a PCI Express 3.0 x4 connection. Asus suggests that gamers who are tired of waiting on ever-larger game installs could benefit from the faster network speeds.[/i<] Ugh. Any of you guys think your gigabit internet connection at home is too slow? Er... any of you guys HAVE a gigabit internet connection? I saw them pull this with the... Skylake era ROG motherboards, too, I think? There was a model that was about $200 above all of the others, because it included a dual port 10gbe nic. I wondered who would buy those. Friends don't let friends buy gaming NICs. [i<]Finally, the ROG Rapture GT-AC5300 appears to be the crown jewel of Asus' router offerings. [/i<] This is NOT a router. It is a ROBOT SPIDER. When you are not looking it will KILL YOU and LAY ROBOT SPIDER EGGS IN YOUR CORPSE. Just nuke it from orbit now. Look at it, it even has an eye in the middle, like a boss from a Zelda game.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 3 years ago

    I just mentioned this on the other post about Asus monitors, but interesting enough to post here as well.
    [quote<] ASUS Launches VG245Q 'Console' Gaming Monitor: 1080p with FreeSync, $200 [/quote<] [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/11235/asus-launches-vg245q-console-gaming-monitor-fhd-freesync-displayport-sub200[/url<]

    • Anovoca
    • 3 years ago

    I feel like I will need to do a game of Sudoku to turn that router on.

    • Bauxite
    • 3 years ago

    If you [b<]really[/b<] care about LAN ping (lol) then you would have already bought some 40Gbps infiniband cards pulled from servers. (most will do 10/40Gbe also) Around a hundred bucks will get you two of them and a cable, with latency in the microseconds. They might even use less power as RJ45 based 10Gbe is pretty wasteful, which is why barely any datacenter switches have it.

    • geniekid
    • 3 years ago

    That router looks like an altar to some dark, ancient god with a hideous name.

    I mean, I’m sure you’d get incredible wireless performance…but at what cost?

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      Your soul…muhahahahhahahahahahhahahahahaha!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      Having to have a piece of Asus design on your shelf.

    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    The AsRock Ryzen Killer SLI motherboard has an Aquatic 5Gbps ethernet chip on board, in addition to a secondary 1Gbps.

    I’d rather Asus do that, instead of selling me an extra card.

    BTW, the router looks like some sort of malevolent cybernetic organism from a sci-fi series.

    • ludi
    • 3 years ago

    Antennas: the racing stripes of network gear.

    • hungarianhc
    • 3 years ago

    It’s funny… I’m sure that router has some great hardware in it, and it certainly looks cool. That being said, as an owner of many Asus routers in the past, firmware issues would come and go constantly. I switched to Ubiquiti for networking, and my speeds are better, and I haven’t rebooted any networking equipment in a year.

      • hansmuff
      • 3 years ago

      I have a RT-N66R and perhaps reboot that once a year because I have to move it or something. They still update the firmware and the wireless has been great for our phones and laptops. No complaints here. But I do wonder how much better all those antennas make the wireless really.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    “Asus suggests that gamers who are tired of waiting on ever-larger game installs could benefit from the faster network speeds. ”

    because. this will give you more bandwidth than what your modem can provide.

      • Whispre
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, that was my first thought too… when my internet connection becomes the bottleneck, I’ll be sure to look this thing up.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      You could aggregate multiple 1 Gbit ISPs. I actually live in an area where such a feat is possible.

        • lycium
        • 3 years ago

        Me too: Poland. Gigabit fibre is $15 per month here.

          • deruberhanyok
          • 3 years ago

          See folks, this is why a state-supported duopoly on internet connections in the US is a bad thing.

    • Grahambo
    • 3 years ago

    All I see looking at that router is Sauron’s crown.

      • juzz86
      • 3 years ago

      Or Kreia’s Temple 😉

    • slowriot
    • 3 years ago

    Neat a consumer 10GbE card. Don’t get at all why Asus thinks it should be marketed towards gamers but whatever I’m still mildly interested.

    Also find it a bit funny Asus doesn’t apparently sell you ROG branded router/switch that will be able to provide 10GbE speeds. Their one consumer device with 10GbE ports has some pretty poor reviews as well. I’m sure that monstrous ROG Rapture GT-AC5300 will be very, very expensive and yet it won’t let you take advantage of your fancy Asus ROG branded NIC.

      • TwoEars
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah – largely useless for gaming, that’s all about ping times and not transfer speeds. Still – would be nice if we could towards 10GbE as the new standard. Why not right.

        • ptsant
        • 3 years ago

        Cabling is a major show-stopper. You can buy the hardware today, but 10Gbps has some extremely tight requirements for the installation. If you didn’t plan really seriously about the future, you may have to redo a big part of your wiring ($$$) otherwise you won’t really see 10Gbps.

        Then again, if you enjoy home improvement this may be your thing…

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          Cat6 isn’t terribly hard to come by.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            The problem is “re-wiring” costs more than simple cabling unless you don’t mind laying down bare UTP across your place.

            It is one of the biggest reasons why SMB-types are so reluctant on moving to 10Gbps and beyond. Older UTP doesn’t cut it and re-wiring cost are too much to justify. You need CAT6a or better for UTP runs greater than 50m. That’s why IEEE created 802.11bz a.k.a 5Gbps Ethernet which can operate on existing CAT5e/CAT6 infrastructure with a fraction of the headaches.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            I would imagine most don’t need longer than 50m runs, but sure, the actual running of cables dwarfs the cost of the cables themselves. It’s still far better than optical if the power usage doesn’t concern you!

            I know I’ll be moving to 10G as soon as switches / NICs become cheap enough. If 5 Gbps actually started showing up via NICs and commodity switches I’d move to it first, but progress on that front seems incredibly slow.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            The 801.11bz spec was just finalized at the end of 2016. I would imagine that SMB-tier networking equipment will start supporting in 2H 2017 and later. Customer-tier stuff will probably start adopting it sometime in 2018.

        • Anovoca
        • 3 years ago

        There is that, but there is also the issue that most popular modern games lack exclusively LAN based play-ability. And since almost no one has that kind of internet connection speed, unless you are blessed with a fiber trunk in your backyard, you are still going to be bottle-necked by your connection to the hosting server.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      That 10 Gbit card has my interest as well. I’m curious about driver support as it would be a nice thing to throw in a NAS box or a Linux router.

      • Welch
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, if these came in separate product release announcements maybe it could be forgiven. But they decided to announce them at the same time. Seems like an interesting marketing idea.

      • ptsant
      • 3 years ago

      I am also wondering if it’s cheaper to get an Intel 10Gbps NIC instead of the Asus one. If the prices are comparable, a “pro” card is probably better value for stability and support down the road.

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