Poll: How much did you spend on your last CPU?

In the wake of AMD's Ryzen 7 launch, PC enthusiasts have been hotly debating the value proposition of CPUs that sell for $300 and up—sometimes a lot more up. Ryzen 7 chips range from $330 to $500, and Intel's Kaby Lake Core i7-7700K marks the threshold of the blue team's high-end offerings at about $350. Broadwell-E CPUs start at $425 and go all the way up to $1650.

We're betting that these high-end CPUs aren't where the majority of folks spend their central-processing dollars, though. The strong interest in Intel's Kaby Lake Pentiums and AMD's Ryzen 5 CPUs of late suggests that many builders are looking more at bang for their buck rather than the biggest bang possible. Where did your most recent CPU fall on the pricing spectrum? Tell us using the poll below and detail your choice in the comments.

Comments closed
    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    My rule of thumb is to spend about 50-100% more on GPU than CPU. i5 4670K $209; GTX 1070 $399. Been working great so far.

    • Mr Bill
    • 3 years ago

    Paid a bit over $200 for an AMD Phenom II X6 1100T BE a couple years ago to replace my X4 955 BE.

    • [SDG]Mantis
    • 3 years ago

    i7-2600K bought in 2011 for $315.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 3 years ago

    Nice bell curve 😀

    • SoundFX09
    • 3 years ago

    Spent $50 about 7 Months ago on an AMD Phenom II X4 945.
    For a CPU Released in 2009, It still is capable of handling Various Games at 1080p.

    Running alongside a GTX 750 ti, I can Max out E-Sports Games like Team Fortress 2, CS:GO, and Dota 2 at 1080p no problem. However, more demanding titles will have to be set at various settings to achieve 60 FPS performance.

    Streaming is possible, but you’ll have to be realistic with your expectations. At best, I can do 720p streaming to Twitch @ 60 FPS on OBS playing Games like Team Fortress 2 and CS:GO, while more demanding games will stay at 720p/30.

    Video Editing can be done, but just like Streaming, you’ll have to be realistic.
    2 Minutes DDR Videos that I make take about 10-20 Minutes depending on how much content I throw into the Video.

    Overall, For $50, I don’t regret my purchase. The Phenom II X4 945 still holds its ground and is a decent Budget Gaming CPU if You’re playing at 1080p or lower.

      • Geonerd
      • 3 years ago

      Go, go BUDGET BUILD!

    • Ifalna
    • 3 years ago

    Bought my 3570K on day 1, so I paid around 240ish incl. express shipping.

    Yup, impatience can be expensive. ^_^

    • sophisticles
    • 3 years ago

    The 7700K retails for $300 at Microcenter, you can’t go by NewEgg and Amazon prices, they are always much more expensive across the board compared to Microcenter.

    • Geonerd
    • 3 years ago

    $89 for the Mighty Tuban! A 1045T from Tiger Direct, a long time ago….

    I spent nearly $200 once, for a slot A Athlon at 1.0 GHz.

    EDIT
    WTF is with the down-vote? Jelly of my killer deal 😉 , or just snobbery?

    • Evan
    • 3 years ago

    I paid $1,089.93 for my Xeon W3680 back in mid-April of 2010, and it’s still working fine in what is now my second desktop (upgraded then from a Xeon W3520, the original CPU I bought for that system when I knew it would later support the not-yet-released W36xx CPUs). I know it wasn’t the best value, but it was the best x86 CPU available at the time and is still nothing to sneeze at seven years later: a six-core 3.33GHz Gulftown with 12MB of L3 and triple-channel ECC DDR3.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    So if one paid $400 for his CPU, does he vote $300-400 or $400-$500?

      • Peter.Parker
      • 3 years ago

      Yes

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I remember paying ~$235 for my 8350 back in December of ’12. My country’s a hellhole.

    • Dent
    • 3 years ago

    My last purchase was an off lease HP ProDesk 600 G1 (i5-4570) with a nice 24″ Monitor and Windows 7 Pro for $320 Kiwi, so not a lot on the CPU really. Its not bad for messing about with ESXi.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 3 years ago

    340$ on a 4790k which OC’s to 4.8ghz. No mystical 5 but it’s so fast I can’t upgrade now.

    • meerkt
    • 3 years ago

    Do used CPUs count? It’s been many years since I’ve bought a new CPU.
    The last, still not installed, I was given for free. The one before cost, I think, less than $10. The one before that was more expensive. Maybe $12-15.

    • Prototyped
    • 3 years ago

    €333 or so shipped from Germany to the UK, including Value Added Tax of 19%, for a Xeon E3-1245v6. That comes to about USD 355 including tax and shipping, about $289 without tax or shipping, for a processor very similar to a Core i7-7700 non-K (3.7-4.1 GHz vs 3.6-4.2 GHz). I don’t overclock or game, so that’s perfectly fine.

    Why a Xeon? In an initialism, ECC. The price premium is pretty minimal these days (bought 2x 8GB DDR4-2400 CL17 single rank UDIMMs with Micron silicon for £135 shipped, incl 20% UK VAT; that’s USD 169, or without tax, $140), and the processor costs about the same as its non-ECC capable Core i7 near-equivalent. The C232 board I bought (yeah, I know, the IGP won’t work with it) was less than £35 more than the B235 equivalent.

    The main worry is that when the parts arrive, the system won’t POST. Unlike the 200 series chipsets for the consumer desktop processors, Intel decided not to launch any new chipsets for the Kaby Lake E3s. The boards that are in channel therefore may be too old to have Kaby Lake supporting firmware out of the box. And I do not have a Skylake processor to flash the board to work with Kaby Lake.

    I have called up a local store and confirmed that they can flash the board with their own equipment, so at least the risk can be mitigated.

    Either way it should be a substantial upgrade from my Phenom II X6 1055T 95W paired with a crappy MSI 760G board with overheating VRMs. Aside from the availability of SSE4.1/SSE4.2/AVX/AVX2, which provide a huge boost in HEVC encoding time (no QuickSync unfortunately due to the chipset choice — simply not worth the £40 to get a C236 board that supports the IGP), improvements during this decade such as USB 3 and NVMe will be much appreciated.

      • MOSFET
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Either way it should be a substantial upgrade from my Phenom II X6 1055T 95W paired with a crappy MSI 760G board with overheating VRMs.[/quote<] Wow...yes indeed, it should be substantial.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    $250 for the r7 1700 and $110 for Gskill 16gb 3200 cas16 single rank. i have no idea which motherboard to get since there’s a very goo chance that my ram is not supported.

    • rudimentary_lathe
    • 3 years ago

    Got a surprisingly good deal on a Xeon last year. In Freedom units it was in the $200-300 range, the most I’ve ever paid for a CPU by far (have mostly gone the bang/buck route with AMD in the past). In local units, it was considerably more :(.

    • chubbyhorse
    • 3 years ago

    I chose the 100-200 range, BUT that was the total cost of the CPU’s for my dual CPU system
    Obtained (2) E5-2670 Xeon’s for $130 for the pair.
    It’s overkill, yes, but I like seeing more logical processors than my last system had in GB of RAM.

    • jokinin
    • 3 years ago

    220€ (~ 235 US$) for an i5 3550 in july 2012.

    • ermo
    • 3 years ago

    The last CPU I bought was an FX-8350, which at the time retailed for just around $200. I paired it with a cheap ASRock 970 board which supports VT-d, because the unlocked intel CPUs at the time supported neither ECC nor VT-d.

    And for Linux use, the extra threads and the compiler optimizations available made it just as good at half the price in its intended role as my i7 3770k (which is still in use as my main Windows box).

    I’m currently putting aside some money to build a Zen or Zen+ & Vega system once both have been optimized for their respective manufacturing processes. The 3770k will have to do until then, and with proper CrossFireX support coming up for ME: Andromeda, it will be more than adequate for my 2xHD7970s.

    EDIT: CrossFireX is supported in patch 1.05! \o/

    P.S. I must confess that I absolutely LOVE ME:A. The Frostbite engine environments look positively incredible IMHO.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      You’re not suffering from any of the issues that other people have pointed out? Broken facial animations, faulty scripting, wonky animation interpolation, extreme asset pop-in, uneven voice mastering, entirely missing voice lines, atrocious writing, or poor game-mechanics design?

        • ermo
        • 3 years ago

        First of all, I’m a MASSIVE ME series fan. So if the issue doesn’t make it impossible to play, I can live with it.

        – Animations: I haven’t seen a broken facial animation yet? Some of them look a little stiff and some of the eye-movements are off, but that’s the extent of it for me.

        – Faulty scripting: I’ve noticed a quest where I could pick up a quest item several times, even after the quest finished, but it wasn’t game breaking AFAICT?

        – Wonky animation interpolation: Male Ryder sometimes zig-zags when going down stairs, but that doesn’t bother me. I haven’t noticed anything else yet.

        – Extreme asset pop-in: Sure, low-res textures are streamed in initially and then the high-res textures land a second or two later. That said, I’ve played quite a lot of Skyrim with modded textures, so I’m used to dealing with a certain amount of pop-in. In other words, it doesn’t affect the gameplay to any great extent for me. YMMV.

        – Uneven voice mastering: I’ve noticed this, but it doesn’t break the game or the immersion for me.

        – Entirely missing voice lines: I’ve noticed an odd period of silence once or twice, but I think that’s about it?

        – Atrocious writing: Not qualified to judge, really. Although, granted, some of the romance-related stuff does seems fairly cringeworthy/cheesy…

        – Poor game-mechanics design: I wish I could have permanent access to a couple of powers and then swap out the rest via profiles. But as I’m someone who made a custom sentinel-based class reminiscent of the ME1 Vanguard class (with an infiltrator cloak as a Kasumi-granted extra bonus power) for my ME3 playthroughs and rebalanced enemy and ally weapons to do the same damage as the player (no cover == swiss cheese Shepard), I figure that it’s just a matter of time before I can mod what I don’t like. And I’m much more a cover-shooter guy, so all the jumping around seems fairly odd to me. Which just means I don’t do it.

        Nothing of the above has actively impeded me when it comes to enjoying playing. But again, maybe that’s just because I view the franchise through rose-tinted glasses. =)

    • travbrad
    • 3 years ago

    Technically $200-300 because of Microcenter but it was $300-400 everywhere else. 6700K.

    I used to go more for the cheaper mid-range “i5” class CPUs, but with how long CPUs last now I figured it was worth spending the extra $100 for Hyper Threading. $100 doesn’t amount to much on something that will likely last 5+ years if recent CPU advancements are any indication.

    • Peter.Parker
    • 3 years ago

    The last CPU I bought was a few years back, an FX-6300. On sale 110 CAD (+ tax).
    Still going nicely, but I’m thinking to upgrade it. That credit card is burning my wallet, got to use it soon.
    I did spend a little more on the GPU, I have now a GTX 960. Good enough for all the games I throw at it. That said, I’m not much of a gamer, the newest title I bought was GTA5. I’m using a FHD screen (in fact, it’s a Samsung TV), no crazy resolution for me, thank you.

    • floodo1
    • 3 years ago

    Nice, over 1/3 of respondents have high end CPUs (>$300) (-8

      • Den2
      • 3 years ago

      Wondering what you consider high end. When I got my CPU (i7-4790k back in 2012), it was <$300 thanks to microcenter. But many people getting the same CPU spent more than $300. Certainly not as high end as any of the 6-core+ CPUs Intel offered at the time.

        • travbrad
        • 3 years ago

        There’s a lot of different definitions of “high-end” for CPUs. Intel has their “mainstream” budget (pentium and i3), mid-range (i5), and high-end (i7) stuff. Then also i7s with more cores on a better platform (higher-end?). Then Xeon configs that blow any of that stuff out of the water (ultra-end?).

        Something that further complicates things is that lightly-threaded performance (relevent to gaming) tops out with the i5 or i7 “mainstream” parts, even though the higher end stuff (including Ryzen 8 cores) has a lot more performance potential if all of the threads are used.

      • tacitust
      • 3 years ago

      Not sure why that’s “nice”. Does buying a high end CPU reflect some intrinsic value in the purchaser that I am missing (i3-6100 CPU owner, myself).

      A more interesting stat (though admittedly nearly impossible to collect) would be how many readers ended up spending more on a CPU (i.e. buying a higher-end CPU) than they actually needed.

        • floodo1
        • 3 years ago

        It’s nice because it means there are a lot of enthusiasts around here (-8

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Two things:

      1) TR skews more towards enthusiasts who will spend more than the market at large.

      2) This is not “nice”. There has been virtually no shift in performance per dollar over the last two to three years, anyhow. Ryzen changes that for certain workloads. We’re on the cusp of something really nice at the low end, but AMD isn’t releasing those CPUs until the second half of the year.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]This is not "nice". There has been virtually no shift in performance per dollar over the last two to three years, anyhow. [/quote<] On the plus side, I see no reason to upgrade my 4670K and I have friends who are still happily gaming on their 2500K. This gives me more money to spend on GPU, monitor, SSDs etc.

          • Grahambo
          • 3 years ago

          I completely agree. I’m still running a 3570K at 4.1GHz and just picked up an OC’d 1070. Couldn’t be happier with the results. As much as I love that new system smell, I just can’t bring myself to pull the trigger on a whole new CPU/Mobo/RAM, when the old stuff still runs so well.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 3 years ago

    Inspired by the 99th percentile frame time benchmarks here and not wanting to upgrade to DDR4 RAM, I decided to go with the Intel Core i7-5775C and overclocked it to 4.2 GHz. I would have gone with the Intel Core i5-5675C, but at the time of purchase there wasn’t much of a difference in price. This is still the best gaming CPU money can buy when overclocked. It beats all the benches I read for the most CPU intensive games.

    For some reason it does even better when I turn off HT, so I just keep it off. If I could do it again I’d get an i5-5675C and saved a few dollars, but maybe HT will come in handy later. Definitely recommended for anyone who wants to OC and whose main concern is gaming. Saved some money by getting a second-hand motherboard. $360 and it’ll be another 5+ years before I upgrade CPU+Mobo+RAM. I’ll wait for DDR5 at a minimum.

    • quarantined
    • 3 years ago

    $317 for a 2600K in January 2011 and still going strong at 4.5GHz. Best purchase ever.

      • NeelyCam
      • 3 years ago

      Same boat, but I didn’t OC, so I could put it in a tiny, quiet case. Still no real reason to upgrade.

    • Star Brood
    • 3 years ago

    I inherited my dad’s old 2x Xeon 5050 + 9800 gt system and spent $13.00 on a new set of 5160’s that literally tripled my performance.

    Rockin’ a $180.00 2GB 7850 that came with 3 great games which all run smoothly.

    Only bottleneck based on what I use it for are the HDD’s which are in some weird 2X RAID-0 setup which have touch and go performance, though not sure how/if this system would benefit from an SSD with only SATA 1.0.

      • Liron
      • 3 years ago

      I’m in a similar boat, so how do we vote? I got $1500 CPUs, but I got them for $230 each on eBay a couple of years ago, where now they are easily available for $108 each. And should we vote for the cost of each CPU or of both of them together?

        • Star Brood
        • 3 years ago

        The idea is to assess how much one is /was willing to spend, I’d say.

      • davidbowser
      • 3 years ago

      Yep. I just ordered a refurb dual x5570 workstation with 24GB RAM for $450. The prices for that type of stuff is SOOO cheap right now that I had to triple check that it wasn’t a typo or mistake.

      I ended up voting for the last custom build CPU I bought, which was $199.

        • MOSFET
        • 3 years ago

        Couldn’t find / wasn’t interested in Westmeres?

          • davidbowser
          • 3 years ago

          Marriage of convenience. I spent a few hours trying to find/match parts (mobo, CPU steppings, ECC RAM, etc.), and reached the “F-this” stage. In an ideal scenario, I would go for the performance/Watt but I didn’t want to spend days and days on something that was a < $500 decision.

          It was like $300 +shipping to get parts and build (time) vs. $450 for a HP z800 workstation.

      • MOSFET
      • 3 years ago

      That’s an interesting system in 2017, like the Gulftown x6 3.33 mentioned somewhere in here. My old-timey server champ is an Opteron 6328 in a 1U 2010 Supermicro/AMD A+ platform. Currently on FreeNAS duty – it’s just too slow for VMs these days.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 3 years ago

    i5 4670k for $250 Canadian 3 years ago — so based on the exchange rate calling that $100 – $200 (converts to $186 USD).

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 years ago

      ?? Reporting my CPU results in a downvote? Sheesh, tough room…

    • Kougar
    • 3 years ago

    Last chip was a 4790K. I came close to going with a six-core HEDT chip but at the time didn’t see enough value for the increase in total platform cost, particularly with the an aging X99 platform.

    My next processor upgrade won’t be for a few more years, but I can tell you it at minimum it will be an 8+ core chip. I’m willing to spend around $500 if the cores, clocks, platform, and performance warrants it.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    7700K; no regrets

      • Jigar
      • 3 years ago

      Man it would have been fun if you had made a spelling mistake.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 3 years ago

    I broke even when I sold my Q9550 and bought a 2500k for around $200 back in 2011. So I voted for cheese. Best zero dollars I ever spent…

    • willmore
    • 3 years ago

    <$10

    It was an Orange Pi Zero board for $7.99 plus shipping. Not sure how much the actual CPU part of it costs.

    • spartacus
    • 3 years ago

    Bought i7-6950x along with 128GB of RAM. Hoping it to serve me for at least 5 years. Had an i5-4690K before. I’ve been looking into Ryzen builds, and despite them being very cost effective the RAM limitations were not something I was ready to deal with.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    $619.99 CDN + tax for an 1800X.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Spec out a new build on PCpartpicker for 1200
      Realize you forgot to hit the canada flag
      It’s now 1600, 15% tax brings it to 1800

      Close tab and cry self to sleep

      The Canadian Dream

        • End User
        • 3 years ago

        The loony was almost at par around 2012. It was a glorious, if all to brief, time.

    • Topinio
    • 3 years ago

    I might have voted in the wrong box, poll unclear if tax should be included. I went for the $300-$400 bucket, but…

    I paid £234.53 + VAT, so £281.44; the dollar that day, 6 days before the Brexit vote, was at 1.4282221535, so it’s $401.96 or $334.96, depending if you were wanting what I actually spent or something to compare against US pricing …

    • Leader952
    • 3 years ago

    $57.50 for a Xeon E3-1225 V2

    I bought a Dell T1650 that came with a Xeon E3-1280 V2, Quadro K600, 16 GB (2x 8GB) PC3-12800U memory and a 1TB hard drive for $275 last December.

    I sold the Xeon E3-1280 V2, Quadro K600 and 16 GB (2x 8GB) PC3-12800U memory on eBay and taking into account all fees (eBay/PayPal/Shipping) resulted in an actual price of -$18.16.

    That is right I got the base T1650 for a negative price.

    Adding the Xeon E3-1225 V2 for $57.50 and 8GB (4x 2GB) PC3-12800E memory at $29.90 brings the total system actual price to $69.24.

    I installed Windows 10 Pro for FREE using the attached Windows 7 COA.

    Nice inexpensive system.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Some Dell workstations off ebay are a steal. 6 IVB cores for like 200 bucks, which is a much better base you’ll get for a gaming rig than almost anything near the price.

        • kvndoom
        • 3 years ago

        Off-lease computers are the shiz! I bought Ms. Doom an HP 1st-gen i5 laptop with 4GB RAM and 15.6″ screen for $180 from Newegg last month. Came with Windows 7 and I got Office through work for 10 bucks. I fell so in love with it while setting it up that I bought another for myself.

    • PGleo86
    • 3 years ago

    My last was my 4790k for just over $300 on Black Friday 2015. It’s running very well still, and I don’t feel any need to upgrade; I guess that’s what you want in a $300 CPU!

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    FX-8350, $170 at Microcenter back in 2014. They had a deal where you could get an Asus M5A97 R2.0 (one of the better mid-range AM3+ boards on the market back then) for 50 bucks if you bought an FX CPU with it.

    Edit: Heh, didn’t realize it had been that long since I bought a CPU.

    • not@home
    • 3 years ago

    I purchased an Intel 6700K last month for $300 to replace my Core 2 Duo E8400 from 1976. Well, at least that is how old that CPU seemed. I went with the 6700K because it was the fastest CPU that is still supported on Win 7. I should be good for another 41 years. Err, I mean 12?

    • Anovoca
    • 3 years ago

    My last CPU purchase was an outlier as I was building a server to host all my blurays. Your conclusion about pentiums and ryzen 5 will however be accurate when it comes to my future builds. Most of my builds going forward will be MITX or MicroATX with highly efficient Ryzen or pentium chips

    • astrotech66
    • 3 years ago

    $399 for a Ryzen 7 1700X

    • The Wanderer
    • 3 years ago

    Core i7 990x Extreme; list price $1000 (or pennies below that), actual purchase price $1050 (ditto).

    I haven’t regretted the purchase (it’s lasted me quite a while, for one thing), but I probably wouldn’t go for that price range again. Then again, I probably *would* go for the $400-$700 price range, if the product available in that price range were a suitable upgrade.

    • toastie
    • 3 years ago

    I’m not including the Celeron and Pentium CPUS I picked up for some low power systems I build, but the last CPU I bought for a desktop system was a 3770K for $225 in April 2013. Microcenter occasionally has some very good deals.

    • colinstu12
    • 3 years ago

    I think some of these prices should’ve been broken up. there’s a big difference between a $100 cpu and a $200 cpu. For example a $101 cpu will be closer in performance to a $99 cpu and a $199 cpu will be closer to a $201 cpu, etc.

    I think it should’ve been:
    0-90
    90-150
    150-200
    200-250
    250-300
    300-400
    400-650
    650+

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      How much did your CPU cost? Let’s just put add that number to the poll.

        • colinstu12
        • 3 years ago

        I added my vote already.

      • colinstu12
      • 3 years ago

      WTF are with the downvotes??

        • tipoo
        • 3 years ago

        Welcome to the Tech Report where the downvotes are cosmetic and the reasons are vain 😛

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          I downvote people that complain about getting downvoted 🙂

        • willmore
        • 3 years ago

        Because you proposed something silly and you seem to think it’s brilliant?

          • colinstu12
          • 3 years ago

          why is it silly?

          and where did I say it was brilliant?
          I’m suggesting it would be a good idea… it would lead to more accurate results. granularity is a good thing.

          might as well bin all the results of all the reviews into four categories and call it a day I guess.

            • willmore
            • 3 years ago

            Start at the beginning. What is the purpose of this poll? Did you read the article before the poll?

            • colinstu12
            • 3 years ago

            Yes I did…and I don’t see how that changes anything.

            What’s your magical logical reasoning for the broad price segments?

            • SoM
            • 3 years ago

            these are just ballpark numbers, why bother getting into single dollars

            it’s just a poll to brag how much cash you threw, this isn’t a $$$/performance poll

            • DPete27
            • 3 years ago

            Clearly the poll is representing what it was meant to. Most “above average consumers” aren’t buying R7-1800X or equivalent/higher priced Intel CPUs. In fact, the $400 price point of the R7-1700X is probably the highest priced consumer chip that AMD needs to worry about. On that same note though, the profit margins for the higher priced chips are greater (the i7-6950X doesn’t cost anywhere near $1,600 to produce) so you don’t need to sell nearly as many to make the same profit from that market as you do in the highly competitive consumer space.

          • NovusBogus
          • 3 years ago

          Dude has a point, though. $100-200 combines budget i3s and sweet-spot i5s which are two very different sets of customers.

        • Eggrenade
        • 3 years ago

        The downvotes are primarily because there’s no cheese option.

    • Bomber
    • 3 years ago

    299 for 5820k on release week at Microcenter.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      That honesty was a pretty decent investment.

      I maintain that Haswell-E was an unusually good investment for non-gamers in 2013.

      You could spend $300ish for an unlocked 6-core cpu and get a platform that supports ddr4 plus other relatively modern amenities.

      Doesn’t sound like a big deal now, but this is almost four years ago.

      [list<] [*<]The HEDT space has only gotten Broadwell-E since then, which is a tiny upgrade on the cpu side and the same exact platform. Four years and that's all we get. [/*<][*<]Up until literally a month ago, it was impossible to upgrade to anything with more than 4 cores that had a materially better perf/price than the 5820K and its 2013-esque pricing. Ryzen only just arrived and Coffeelake will bring 6 cores for $200-300ish, but that's 6+ months away. [/*<] [/list<] So 2013's underrated Haswell-E is only just now beginning to look even a little old. And it's 2017. It's not often you get a deal like that, especially from Intel.

        • Bomber
        • 3 years ago

        Best upgrade ever. Was about $100 more to go to 5820k over a 4770k due to DDR4 costs, and couldn’t be happier. I’ve added a few odds and ends as I’ve gone along but at 4.5ghz I haven’t lacked for power for anything. Like the x58 folks, in a couple years if it starts to feel “old” I’ll eBay an off lease Xeon 8+ core processor and keep going for a bit longer.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    My last purchase was more than any other CPU I’ve purchased in my life. So my answer is skewed slightly. I’d normally fall in that 100-200 range, but my 6600K was $240 and this time it’s $300+.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      That’s what you’re forced to do when a market stagnates. The only way you can “upgrade” is to spend more than you did last time.

        • NovusBogus
        • 3 years ago

        The flip side of that is that it won’t go obsolete in a few months like the previous ones did.

      • davidbowser
      • 3 years ago

      Right there with you. I had to look up the *before last* one and it was $199.99.

      I think my 3450S Ivy Bridge still makes a good bang-for-buck result compared to everything from Intel, which is why I have not bothered to upgrade yet.

    • The Egg
    • 3 years ago

    Having a nearby Microcenter skews the results slightly though, as nearly all i5’s can be gotten for $199 or less

      • toastie
      • 3 years ago

      You say that like it is a bad thing. I’m waiting to see what they’ll do when the R5s come out.

        • The Egg
        • 3 years ago

        Only bad as far as analyzing data, as most i5’s are in the next price bracket from anyone else.

      • unclesharkey
      • 3 years ago

      I got an 8320 E from Microcenter in November of last year for $79.00.

        • unclesharkey
        • 3 years ago

        You can currently get an 8350 with the Wraith cooler for $129.99 at Microcenter.

    • drfish
    • 3 years ago

    FWIW a [url=https://smile.amazon.com/Station-Stainless-Steel-Cheese-Making/dp/B0153TK6YM/<]quality CheesePU[/url<] is going to ring in at around $150.

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      That closer to an abacus than a CPU.

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