Visit a gorgeous lab in Unigine’s Superposition benchmark test

Unigine, the team behind well-known benchmark software like Valley and Heaven, has released a new benchmark called Superposition. The Valley benchmark is going on four years old now, and it's time for something more modern. Superposition brings a bunch of new features while being able to more thoroughly stress modern cards in new and interesting ways that weren't common back in the ancient year of 2013.

Superposition is built using the Unigine 2 engine. The benchmark is available for both Windows and Linux, and is currently compatible with OpenGL 4.5 and DirectX 11. Unigine 2 currently doesn't support Vulkan or DirectX 12, so it would seem that neither does Superposition. According to the company, the test makes use of its unique "Screen-Space Ray-Tracing Global Illumination" technique for better light and shadow rendering.

The benchmark offers a variety of ways to punish video cards, including stress testing, presets for different feature levels, and resolutions up to 7680×4320 (8K). There's also a test designed specifically for VR readiness that's compatible with both HTC Vive and Oculus Rift.

That push for VR prompted Unigine to give this newest benchmark a bit of a story and an interactive mode. If you hadn't concluded this from watching the video above, Superposition uses a fictional physicist's office as the testbed. A loud bang inside the office leads you, a student, to investigate the now-abandoned lab and figure out what happened. The interactive mode offers some mini-games to play as you look around the meticulously-detailed office for clues. This mode is a first for Unigine's benchmarks, and might warrant checking it out just to see what the company cooked up.

The basic version of benchmark is free to download on Unigine's website and weighs in at about 1GB. The company apparently also offers two additional versions: an Advanced upgrade with VR support and a looped stress test for $19.95, and a full-blown Pro package with command-line execution and per-frame analysis for $995.

Comments closed
    • djayjp
    • 3 years ago

    Looks much better than Time Spy..but still not quite photorealistic.

      • JosiahBradley
      • 3 years ago

      I thought the original unreal tournament was photo realistic. Photos just keep getting better every year as I age.

    • jokinin
    • 3 years ago

    Runs fine with a GTX1060 @1080p and high detail. Extreme will bring almost any GPU to its knees. There is a post in the forums if you’re willing to share results.

    • blahsaysblah
    • 3 years ago

    Valley was their prettiest work, wish they would re-release/update for/with latest engine.

    Occasionally run it just to watch it.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 3 years ago

    Really good opportunity here for an eventual update that adds D3D 12 and Vulkan, for good comparison across all four APIs on the same application.

    • oldog
    • 3 years ago

    Hmm… “The Structure of Objects” by Kathrin Koslicki. Ontology in benchmarking?

    • JosiahBradley
    • 3 years ago

    Time to finally bring my cards to their knees. Going to OC until they explode. This thing looks beautiful!

    Edit: results breakdown,
    1080 medium: 8671
    1080 high: 6215
    1080 extreme: 2718

    4k was a beautiful cinematic slideshow at 20fps with medium texture (vram limited)

      • TwoEars
      • 3 years ago

      I got 15114 @1080p_High

      Nice demo.

    • confusedpenguin
    • 3 years ago

    Benchmark environments always look too clean and sterile. They should add some dust, scuff marks, and fingerprints to add to the realism.

      • krazyredboy
      • 3 years ago

      Along with the appropriate amount of Cheeto dust, on the keyboards?

        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago

        cat hair between the keys

    • Lordhawkwind
    • 3 years ago

    1080p or 4K you’re having a laugh. What’s happened to 1440p FFS. Complete and utter POS software.

      • synthtel2
      • 3 years ago

      Not only that, but “4K optimized” drops enough stuff back to 1080p that you get 1080p jaggies.

      • OptimumSlinky
      • 3 years ago

      Go to custom settings and you can set whatever resolution you’d like.

    • synthtel2
    • 3 years ago

    Oh, ray-traced GI is a thing? This explains why extreme is so extreme. Still, would throwing some SMAA in really have hurt?

    Now I’m really curious how core vs VRAM clocks affect extreme mode, and here Nvidia broke my OCs. D:<

    • Questar
    • 3 years ago

    Word is crossfire/sli is broken.

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      That’s a gentle hint that gamers should be spending their money elsewhere.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Word is crossfire/sli is broken,[/quote<] and always has been.

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 3 years ago

        Word is crossfire/sli is broken, and always has been dangerously cheesy.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, defiantly doesn’t work. Only game I still play that uses it is GTA V, and how old is that now? I’ve bought lots of newer titles like Titanfall 2, Planet Coaster, Forza Horizon etc – All single card only… I spot a trend happening here, and I don’t like it. 🙁

    • Dposcorp
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder if the lab was run by Aperture Science ?

      • synthtel2
      • 3 years ago

      It looks more like Black Mesa’s style, really (from decades before the events of HL1).

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 3 years ago

        HL3…still unconfirmed :'(

      • quarantined
      • 3 years ago

      PurPORTALly.

        • Redocbew
        • 3 years ago

        You win.

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          Perfect!

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