ROG B250H and B250G are gaming mobos for the everyman

When you hear "Republic of Gamers", you probably start thinking of high-end parts like the Maximus motherboards and Strix graphics cards. If that's the case, the two new motherboards coming from Asus' ROG division may be a surprise. Check out the B250H Gaming and B250G Gaming. Both of these LGA 1151 mobos use Intel's B250 chipset and provide budget-priced platforms for high-performance gaming rigs.

These actually aren't ROG's first motherboards using the B250 chipset—the B250F Gaming holds that title. The two new offerings skip a few of the niceties on that model (like USB 3.1 ports) in exchange for a spiffy black-and-red color scheme and a lower price. You still get four DDR4 memory slots, six USB 3.0 ports, six 6 Gbps SATA ports, and a pair of PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 sockets. One of the M.2 sockets on each board also supports an Optane cache drive, while the other supports SATA M.2 drives.

Asus opted for Intel-powered Gigabit Ethernet on these boards, while audio comes by way of the ROG "SupremeFX" suite powered by Realtek's excellent ALC1220 codec. The only difference in the two boards is that the B250H Gaming is an ATX motherboard while the B250G fits a microATX form factor. The extra size wins the B250H an extra PCIe x16 slot (only x4 electrically) and an extra PCIe x1 slot. 

Of course, all overclocking is locked out on motherboards using Intel's B250 chipset, including memory overclocking. As a result, CPUs will be limited to their maximum turbo frequency, and memory speeds will be limited to 2400 MT/s. However, given the high clock rates on offer from Intel's latest CPUs, we reckon all but the most demanding gamers will be satisfied with the stock speeds.

We couldn't find the B250G Gaming or B250H Gaming at e-tail yet, but the Guru of 3D got word that Asus will be asking €129 (or $137) for the B250H Gaming and just €99 ($105) for the B250G.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    These are probably gonna be paired with a midrange Core i5. But you know what? Ever since I saw how those Ryzen 5 chips bulldoze the i5s and throw their carcasses down an excavator-dug pit, I dunno. Yeah sure Intel still leads the Ryzen 5s like a phenom in gaming but what if you turned geekazoid all of a sudden and decide to simulate subatomic particles on your computer using software that can spawn a billion threads?

    The only thing that ticks me off about the AM4 platform is how there are asterisks all over the place in regards to the expansion slots. Like how a PCIe X4 slot drops down to X2 if you populate one or two PCIe X1 slots that may be present. Yeah I know this also applies to Intel but with fewer PCIe lanes AM4 just feels a bit too ‘just enough’. I usually have a WiFi adapter on an X1 slot and a Sound Blaster on another X1 slot, so that X4 slot pretty much becomes an X2. No biggie​, but I get more lanes and far less constraints on my 990FX board.

    • south side sammy
    • 2 years ago

    look like something HP or dell would install on their machines.
    these boards ( most newer ) are all getting to be looking very sparse anymore. Maybe it’s time for a redesign. Either that, or electronic components are going to have to start growing in size again.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 2 years ago

    Well, that about does it for ROG.

    Asus, if every product is a ROG product, it’s going to be a hard sell for the more expensive ROG products.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Typical spend years and years to build a brand and the moment it is strong try to cash in on all that effort.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 2 years ago

    Another day, another motherboard with odd design choices.

    Why put a PCI-E 1x slot underneath the graphics card on a motherboard aimed at gamers?

    Also, DVI-D and HDMI 1.4 outputs? There should either be something worthy of the high price tag or they should aim for maximum compatibility for troubleshooting faulty cards. DVI-I and DisplayPort maybe, the former covers VGA, DVI and HDMI and the latter DP-only G-sync monitors.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      I assume you’re talking about the mATX board. The x1 slot right below the x16 slot is just there because it’s cheap to include and because it gives systems with no dGPU extra expansion slots.

      You can convert DVI to VGA with common cheap adapters that most people probably have lying around. Also, most budget monitors are at best going to have HDMI and NOT display port. HDMI allows you to pass audio, whereas a DVI-HDMI adapter will not. Furthermore, you won’t be able to run DP-only GSync from your IGP, so that’s really not even a talking point.

      I think you can do 4k/30Hz from HDMI1.4? I know Kaby Lake IGP can do 4k/60Hz but likely only over DP. I think it’s safe to say that most people buying a mobo like this aren’t going to (a) own a 4k monitor, or (b) drive a 4k monitor off the IGP.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]I think you can do 4k/30Hz from HDMI1.4? I know Kaby Lake IGP can do 4k/60Hz but likely only over DP. I think it's safe to say that most people buying a mobo like this aren't going to (a) own a 4k monitor, or (b) drive a 4k monitor off the IGP.[/quote<] Bear in mind that Asus are asking the high price of £125 for it. This is very much aimed at a luxury buyer, not a value for money one. Anyone even considering spending this much on a motherboard would have to be mad not to own a good screen. A comparably priced pre-built system such as an Optiplex 5040 has two 3840x2160@60hz capable displayport outputs and an additional HDMI output. It's not a high end feature. It just feels like a bit of poor design on what's supposed to be a premium product under Asus' flagship branding. I don't understand the rationale for including two similar low end outputs. Diversity or quality would have made more sense to me.

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          I know your’e only using the Optiplex 5040 as an example, so I won’t grind too much on that, but an OEM box like the Optiplex is meant for office use driving multiple monitors with non-graphics-intensive workloads and really aren’t intended to ever use a dGPU.
          Non-OEM mobos like the ones above are more likely to end up in custom builds where statistics show most users will be running a dGPU on anything but the most budget of budget builds. Hence the variety of onboard display connections are less critical than on an OEM machine. Like I said, their choice of onboard display connections looks to be on par for their market as well as their competitor’s offerings.

          Also, manufacturers like Asus offer so many varieties of boards that if the IO on one board doesn’t suit your exact needs, they’ll likely have another in the same price range that does.

          [Add] Oh, and Asus is already typically the most expensive of the big 4. Then you stack their ROG naming on there, and yes, those prices are high for what you’re really getting.

      • Goty
      • 2 years ago

      I actually appreciate the slot placement there. All of my GPU’s end up single-slot anyhow (yay, watercooling!), and mounting extra expansion cards immediately under the GPU helps maintain a clean look.

        • Redocbew
        • 2 years ago

        You’ve got a card worth watercooling that doesn’t have a dual slot port cluster?

          • Goty
          • 2 years ago

          Currently my RX480, so yes.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Founder’s Editions are popular for watercooling. GTX 1080 Ti FE has a single-slot port cluster.

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Nifty. Must have missed that when I read the review.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      on the mATX board, the two options for that slot under the graphics card are:

      1) a PCI-E 1x slot.
      2) the m.2 slot.

      Given the two options, the current layout is a no-brainer and the alternative would cook the M.2 drive which is stupid.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 2 years ago

        Cutting your number of usable 1x expansion slots in half from two to one isn’t stupid?

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          Depends on what x1 drives you expect to use. Safe to say most people will only populate the x1 slot with a WiFi card. Even then, you can get USB WiFi adapters these days…. A second x1 slot is most commonly unused (see arguments about why everyone still thinks they need full ATX boards when all those extra expansion slots go unused anyway)

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, I’ve been grumbling about how they keep putting slots underneath the primary X16 slot for centuries now. Who the heck buys an i5 or i7 and plugs in a single slot graphics card anyway? The mATX board here probably could’ve shifted those two X1 slots one slot position down. There’s still room there, as you can see.

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        Agreed. I really wonder who’s putting two M.2 SSDs in their systems anyway.

    • Growler
    • 2 years ago

    Gaming. Pshaw. If they were really gaming motherboards, they’d be festooned with LEDs. These boards demonstrate a complete lack of festooning.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This