AOC C4008VU8 display serves up 10-bit color on a 40″ platter

Bigger might not always be better, but it's hard to say no to a giant display. Users who require a massive amount of real estate on top of their desks might want to take a look at AOC's latest mammoth monitor, the C4008VU8. This 40" curved display comes with professional credentials and a reasonable price tag.

The C4008VU8 has a 10-bit VA panel with an 1800R curvature. Most users prefer their large panels to be paired with high resolutions, as pixel density tends to suffer otherwise. They'll be happy to know that AOC opted for a 3840×2160 resolution for this display. The screen refreshes at 60 Hz and has a 5ms response time. Additionally, the C4008VU8's color reproduction should cover 85% of the NTSC gamut. Users with complementary hardware should have a reasonable expectation of getting professional-quality images and video from the monitor.

AOC added a wide range of inputs to the C4008VU8, including one VGA port, one HDMI 1.4 and two HDMI 2.0 ports, and two DisplayPort 1.2 connectors. There's also a four-port USB 3.0 hub with one fast-charging port.

Interested United States buyers don't need to wait for some unnamed date in the future to grab one of these displays. The C4008VU8 is already available on Newegg for roughly $850.

Comments closed
    • lycium
    • 2 years ago

    If it weren’t curved I’d buy one right now. Damnit 🙁

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    VA panel… what is that? How does it stack with TN, IPS, OLED… please help me see where this thing lands on the value spectrum.

    Because that size and resolution is something I really want and the sub 1,000 dollar price is really appealing.

    EDIT: as others have observed… the lack of syncing technology is a big set back. But I am a believer that until we get a universal standard that both GPU’s use its kinda a moot point. I like to use the same monitor for 10 years at a time… expecting today’s syncing standards to hold up on 10 years of GPU’s is a bit of a joke.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      VA panels have been around a long time… they were always sort of the “other” good option alongside IPS if you wanted to get away from TN panel hideous viewing angles.

      They don’t suffer from “IPS glow”, and typically have nearer 3000:1 static contrast ratio compared to IPS’s typical 1000:1, so much deeper, more pure black levels.
      The downside is that they’ve tended to lag behind on response times considerably, and they have a slight “dulling” effect with viewing angle that IPS doesn’t typically suffer from.

      For a long time they all-but died out. They’re seeing a massive resurgence lately, and it seems that manufacturers are managing to improve the response time issue… although they still don’t get close to a TN panel in that regard, and it seems won’t catch up to IPS in that regard either.
      I get the impression they’re seen as a good fit for curved screens as the curve presumably stops the slight hint of “dulling” at the extreme edges of the screen.

      Personally I love them… the IPS glow effect drives me nuts, and VA panels usually look stunningly rich compared to TN and IPS. Still definitely not the best choice as a gaming monitor, unless you play exclusively slow-paced games. Luckily I actually fall in that demographic most of the time. I’ve had a 144hz Asus G-Sync monitor for quite a while, but ultimately I’ve decided I actually prefer a 60hz VA panel for gaming, for all the lovely deep shadow detail.

      Obviously OLED is the super-tech that has the absolute best of all worlds… but the burn-in (“image retention”) issues still seem to be being dealt with, and obviously they’ve taking their sweet time making it to market in anything like an affordable package. Once there’s a few viable mass-market OLEDs out there, I suspect things will very rapidly move in that direction.

    • Shobai
    • 3 years ago

    What stock they had didn’t seem to last long…

    • ante9383
    • 3 years ago

    No Sync (G-Sync being my flavor), No Buy!

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    I was in love until I read that it was a 60Hz fixed-refresh.

    Even a paltry 48-60Hz freesync range would be enough to make me consider this, but nobody should be buying a fixed-refresh display in 2017 unless they’re just looking for anything in the bargain bin that can display a picture.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 3 years ago

      I think the main market for this is 2D photo work. Refresh rate is not all that important.

        • Acidicheartburn
        • 3 years ago

        Agreed. Nothing about this monitor makes me think it was ever intended to do a whole lot of gaming.

      • south side sammy
      • 3 years ago

      I would consider a “fixed” rate display. kind of insulting to have to either pick a free-sync or g-sync instead of a good monitor. it limits your options.
      60Hz, yeah, kinda slow. But who can power a display that big with that res to anything more? Lets face it.

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 3 years ago

    I like it. Very tempting.

    • remosito
    • 3 years ago

    No HDR and Freesync makes this a no-buy 🙁

      • Sargent Duck
      • 3 years ago

      Yep, it’s not like FreeSync costs anything to implement…

        • Acidicheartburn
        • 3 years ago

        On the chance that you’re not being sarcastic, FreeSync has no royalties like G-sync, but it does have R&D costs associated with implementing it into a device. As a professional development monitor trying to offer a lot of screen real estate and accurate color reproduction on a budget, it’s conceivable that they decided to forgo Variable Refresh technology in order to keep costs down, regardless of vendor-specific royalties or not.

    • GrimDanfango
    • 3 years ago

    Can somebody *please* make quoting only the “dynamic contrast ratio”, even in the supposed official spec sheet, a capital offense?

    Measuring the black level of a screen when it is essentially turned off is about as useful as measuring the black level of a dog that happened to be passing. That would obviously be a preferable scenario too, and make much more appealing marketing material.

      • Growler
      • 3 years ago

      It’s like, how much more black could this be? And the answer is none. None more black.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Have they started coating displays in vantablack yet? Then the answer is it could always be more black.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 years ago

          They really missed a trick not calling vantablack spinalblack.

        • morphine
        • 3 years ago

        Metallica: hold our beers.

          • psuedonymous
          • 3 years ago

          Disaster Area: Have you [i<]seen[/i<] our spaceship?

    • kcarlile
    • 3 years ago

    Make it an 8K and you’ve got something there. 🙂

      • Techtree101
      • 3 years ago

      Indeed, though 8K is a bit of a stretch for most cable connection, especially when pushing above 60hz, HDR, etc. DP 1.4 can do it at least.

      The issue with going beyond 32″ with even 4K is that by the time you get to this 40″, you are back to 109 DPI or so, which is typical for a 27″ monitor these days pre-4K. Not bad, but not great either.

        • kcarlile
        • 3 years ago

        That’s why I want an 8K. I want my retina desktop back. I was running a pair of 32″ 4Ks at retina, but they were killing both my neck and my laptop’s GPU. I now have a better GPU (and a way to use an eGPU), but there are no large 8Ks or even 5Ks out there.

          • Oem
          • 3 years ago

          I have a 40″ 4K and just measured my eye is 29″ away in my current sitting position; this website [url<]http://isthisretina.com/[/url<] claims this display becomes retina at 31" -- so pretty close, and obviously if I shifted myself or the monitor just a little bit it would qualify. Perhaps not everyone defines or perceives retina the same -- or are you just referring to your home setup where you don't yet have 40" @ 4k? It is possible now for a reasonable price to have a large, retina display. I do also look forward to affordable 8K tho, clearly 4K is at the ragged edge of retina for large displays.

        • blahsaysblah
        • 3 years ago

        DP1.4 can do 8K with mathematically lossy compression only. No port can do 4k@120Hz w/10 bit colors yet.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      If it was 8K, you probably wouldn’t like the price.

        • kcarlile
        • 3 years ago

        If it was 8K, I would replace my 4K 40″ at work with it.

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